Definitions of Authorship

arranged arrange verb arranged, arranging, arranges verb, transitive 1. To put into a specific order or relation; dispose: arrange shoes in a neat row. 2. To plan or prepare for: arrange a picnic. 3. To bring about an agreement concerning; settle: "It has been arranged for him by his family to marry a girl of his own class" (Edmund Wilson). 4. Music. To reset (a composition) for other instruments or voices or for another style of performance. verb, intransitive 1. To come to an agreement. 2. To make preparations; plan: arrange for a big wedding. [Middle English arengen, from Old French arengier : a-, to (from Latin ad-). See AD + rengier, to put in a line (from reng, line).] - arrang'er noun Synonyms: arrange, marshal, order, organize, sort, systematize. The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to distribute or dispose persons or things properly or methodically": arranging figures in numerical sequence; marshal all the relevant facts for the presentation; tried to order my chaotic life; organizing and coordinating fund-raising efforts; sorted the sweaters according to color; systematizing a vast assortment of rules into a cohesive whole.


assembled assemble verb assembled, assembling, assembles verb, transitive 1. To bring or call together into a group or whole: assembled the jury. 2. To fit together the parts or pieces of: assemble a machine; assemble data. verb, intransitive To gather together; congregate. [Middle English assemblen, from Old French assembler, from Vulgar Latin assimulâre : Latin ad-, ad- + Latin simul, together.]


assigned assign verb, transitive assigned, assigning, assigns 1. To set apart for a particular purpose; designate. 2. To select for a duty or office; appoint. 3. To give out as a task; allot. 4. To ascribe; attribute. 5. Law. To transfer (property, rights, or interests) from one to another. 6. To place (a person or a military unit) under a specific command. [Middle English assignen, from Old French assigner, from Latin assignâre : ad-, ad+ signâre, to mark (from signum, sign).] Synonyms: assign, allot, apportion, allocate. These verbs mean to set aside or give out in portions or shares. Both assign, which applies to an authoritative act, and allot refer to arbitrary distribution, but neither implies equality or fairness of division: The hardest work was assigned to the strongest laborers. We allot a half hour a day for recreation. To apportion is to divide according to prescribed rules and implies fair distribution: "The first duty of a legislator is to apportion penalties" (Walter Savage Landor). Allocate usually means to set something apart from a larger quantity, as of money, for a specific purpose or for a particular person or group: A portion of the budget was allocated for the education of each student.


authored author noun 1. a. The original writer of a literary work. b. One who practices writing as a profession. 2. An originator or creator: the author of a new theory. 3. Author. God. verb, transitive authored, authoring, authors To assume responsibility for the content of (a published or an unpublished text). [Middle English auctour, from Old French autor, from Latin auctor, creator, from auctus, past participle of augêre, to create.] - author'ial adjective Usage Note: The verb author, which had been out of use for a long period, has been rejuvenated in recent years with the sense "to assume responsibility for the content of a published text." As such it is not quite synonymous with the verb write; one can write, but not author, a love letter or an unpublished manuscript, and the writer who ghostwrites a book for a celebrity cannot be said to have "authored" the creation. The sentence He has authored a dozen books on the subject was unacceptable to 74 percent of the Usage Panel, probably because it implies that the fact of having a book published is worthy of special lexical distinction, a notion that sits poorly with conventional literary sensibilities, and which seems to smack of press agentry. The sentence The Senator authored a bill limiting uses of desert lands in California was similarly rejected by 64 percent of the Panel, though here the usage is common journalistic practice, and is perhaps justified by the observation that we do not expect that legislators will actually write the bills to which they attach their names. The verb coauthor is well established in reference to scientific and scholarly publications, where it serves a useful purpose, since the people listed as authors of such works routinely include research collaborators who have played no part in the actual writing of the text, but who are nonetheless entitled to credit for the published results.


authority noun plural authorities Abbr. auth. 1. a. The power to enforce laws, exact obedience, command, determine, or judge. b. One that is invested with this power, especially a government or government officials: land titles issued by the civil authority. 2. Power assigned to another; authorization: Deputies were given authority to make arrests. 3. A public agency or corporation with administrative powers in a specified field: a city transit authority. 4. a. An accepted source of expert information or advice: a noted authority on birds; a reference book often cited as an authority. b. A quotation or citation from such a source: biblical authorities for a moral argument. 5. Justification; grounds: On what authority do you make such a claim? 6. A conclusive statement or decision that may be taken as a guide or precedent. 7. Power to influence or persuade resulting from knowledge or experience: political observers who acquire authority with age. 8. Confidence derived from experience or practice; firm self-assurance: played the sonata with authority. [Middle English auctorite, from Old French autorite, from Latin auctoritâs, auctoritât-, from auctor, creator.]


authorized authorize verb, transitive authorized, authorizing, authorizes 1. To grant authority or power to. 2. To give permission for; sanction: the city agency that authorizes construction projects. 3. To be sufficient grounds for; justify. [Middle English auctorisen, from Old French autoriser, from Medieval Latin auctorizâre, from Latin auctor, author.] Synonyms: authorize, accredit, commission, empower, license. The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to give someone the authority to act": authorized her partner to negotiate in her behalf; a representative who was accredited by his government; commissioned the real-estate agent to purchase the house for us; was empowered to make decisions during the president's absence; a pharmacist licensed to practice in two states.


chosen chosen verb Past participle of CHOOSE. adjective 1. Selected from or preferred above others: the chosen few. 2. Having been selected by God; elect. noun plural chosen 1. One of the elect. 2. The elect considered as a group. choose verb chose chosen choosing, chooses verb, transitive 1. To select from a number of possible alternatives; decide on and pick out. 2. a. To prefer above others: chooses the supermarket over the neighborhood grocery store. b. To determine or decide: chose to fly rather than drive. verb, intransitive To make a choice; make a selection: was used to doing as she chose. [Middle English chesen, from Old English cêosan.] Synonyms: choose, select, elect, pick. These verbs mean to make a choice from a number of possibilities. Choose implies the use of judgment in taking one of several persons, things, or courses of action: "We do not choose survival as a value; it chooses us" (B.F. Skinner). Select stresses fastidiousness in choosing from a wide variety: Four skiers will be selected to represent each country. Elect strongly suggests deliberation in making a selection, usually between alternatives: I elected not to go. Pick, like select, indicates care in choosing: "Not only do I knock 'em out, I pick the round" (Muhammad Ali).


collected collect verb collected, collecting, collects verb, transitive 1. To bring together in a group or mass; gather. 2. To accumulate as a hobby or for study. 3. To call for and obtain payment of: collect taxes. 4. To recover control of: collect one's emotions. 5. To call for (someone); pick up: collected the children and drove home. verb, intransitive [Latin trânscrìbere : trâns-, trans- + scrìbere, to write.] 1. To come together in a group or mass; gather. Synonyms: gather, collect, assemble, congregate, accumulate, amass. These verbs mean to bring or come together in a group or mass. Gather is the most general term and therefore the most widely applicable: The tour guide gathered the visitors in the hotel lobby. A group of students gathered in front of the administration building to demand divestiture. I gathered sticks as kindling for the fire. Clouds gather before a thunderstorm. Collect is often interchangeable with gather: A proctor will collect (or gather) the examination papers at the end of the hour. Tears collected (or gathered) in her eyes. Frequently, however, collect refers to the careful selection of like or related things that become part of an organized whole: collects antiques; collected stamps. Assemble in all of its senses implies that the persons or things involved have a definite and usually close relationship. With respect to persons the term suggests convening out of common interest or purpose: Assembling an able staff was more difficult than raising the funds to finance the venture. The new legislature will assemble in January. With respect to things assemble implies gathering and fitting together components, as of a structure or machine: The curator is devoting time and energy to assembling an interesting exhibit of Stone Age artifacts. Congregate refers chiefly to the coming together of a large number of persons or animals: After the lecture the physicians congregated in the library to compare notes. Accumulate applies to the increase of like or related things over an extended period: They gradually accumulated enough capital to be financially secure after retirement. Old newspapers and magazines are accumulating in the basement. Amass refers to the collection or accumulation of things, especially valuable things, to form an imposing quantity: families who amassed great fortunes in the days before income tax. [Middle English collecten, from Latin colligere, collêct- : com-, com- + legere, to gather.]


commissioned commission noun 1. a. The act of granting certain powers or the authority to carry out a particular task or duty. b. The authority so granted. c. The matter or task so authorized: Investigation of fraud was their commission. d. A document conferring such authorization. 2. a. Abbr. Com., com., comm.. A group of people officially authorized to perform certain duties or functions: The Federal Trade Commission investigates false advertising. b. Often Commission.Aruling council within the Mafia that adjudicates family disputes and regulates family activities. 3. The act of committing or perpetrating: the commission of a crime. 4. A fee or percentage allowed to a sales representative or an agent for services rendered. 5. a. Abbr. Com., com., comm. An official document issued by a government, conferring on the recipient the rank of a commissioned officer in the armed forces. b. The rank and powers so conferred. [Middle English commissioun, from Latin commissio, commission-, from commissus, past participle of committere, to entrust.] Synonyms: authorize, accredit, commission, empower, license. The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to give someone the authority to act": authorized her partner to negotiate in her behalf; a representative who was accredited by his government; commissioned the real-estate agent to purchase the house for us; was empowered to make decisions during the president's absence; a pharmacist licensed to practice in two states.


compiled compile verb, transitive compiled, compiling, compiles 1. To gather into a single book. 2. To put together or compose from materials gathered from several sources: compile an encyclopedia. 3. Computer Science. To translate (a program) into machine language. [Middle English compilen, from Old French compiler, probably from Latin compìlâre, to plunder : com-, com- + pìla, heap (of stones), pillar.]


composed compose verb composed, composing, composes Abbr. comp. verb, transitive 1. To make up the constituent parts of; constitute or form: an exhibit composed of French paintings; the many ethnic groups that compose our nation. 2. To make or create by putting together parts or elements. 3. To create or produce (a literary or musical piece). 4. To make (oneself) calm or tranquil: Compose yourself and deal with the problems logically. 5. To settle or adjust; reconcile: They managed to compose their differences. 6. To arrange aesthetically or artistically. 7. Printing. To arrange or set (type or matter to be printed). verb, intransitive 1. To create a literary or a musical piece. 2. Printing. To set type. [Middle English composen, from Old French composer, alteration (influenced by poser, to put, place COMPONENT: adjective Being or functioning as a constituent or an ingredient. [From Latin componêns, component-, present participle of componere, to put together : com-, com- + ponere, to put.]


coordinated coordinate noun 1. One that is equal in importance, rank, or degree. 2. coordinates. A set of articles, as of clothing or luggage, designed to match or complement one other, as in style or color. 3. Mathematics. Any of a set of two or more numbers used to determine the position of a point, line, curve, or plane in a space of a given dimension with respect to a system of lines or other fixed reference. adjective 1. Of equal importance, rank, or degree: coordinate offices of a business. 2. Of or involving coordination. 3. Of or based on a system of coordinates. verb coordinated, coordinating, coordinates verb, transitive 1. To place in the same order, class, or rank. 2. To harmonize in a common action or effort: coordinating the moving parts of a machine; coordinate the colors of a design. verb, intransitive 1. To be coordinate: The generators coordinate so that one is always running. 2. To work together harmoniously: a nursing staff that coordinates smoothly. 3. To form a pleasing combination; match: shoes that coordinate with the rest of the outfit. [CO- + ORDINATE.] coordination noun 1. a. The act of coordinating. b. The state of being coordinate; harmonious adjustment or interaction. 2. Physiology. Harmonious functioning of muscles or groups of muscles in the execution of movements. [French, from Medieval Latin coordinâtio, coordinâtion- : co-, co- + Latin ordinâtio, arrangement (from ordinâtus, past participle of ordinâre, to arrange in order, from ordo, order).]


created create verb, transitive created, creating, creates 1. To cause to exist; bring into being. 2. To give rise to; produce: That remark created a stir. 3. To invest with an office or title; appoint. 4. To produce through artistic or imaginative effort: create a poem; create a role. [Middle English createn, from Latin creâre, creât-.]


delivered deliver verb delivered, delivering, delivers verb, transitive 1. To bring or transport to the proper place or recipient; distribute: deliver groceries; deliver the mail. 2. To surrender (someone or something) to another; hand over: delivered the criminal to the police. 3. To secure (something promised or desired), as for a candidate or political party: campaign workers who delivered the ward for the mayor. 4. To throw or hurl: The pitcher delivered the ball. 5. To strike (a blow). 6. To express in words; declare or utter: deliver a lecture. 7. a. To give birth to: She delivered a baby boy this morning. b. To assist (a woman) in giving birth: The doctor delivered her of twins. c. To assist or aid in the birth of: The midwife delivered the baby. 8. To give forth or produce: The oil well delivered only 50 barrels a day. 9. To set free, as from misery, peril, or evil: deliver a captive from slavery. [Middle English deliveren, from Old French delivrer, from Late Latin dêlìberâre : Latin dê-, de- + lìberâre, to free (from lìber, free).]


depicted depict verb, transitive depicted, depicting, depicts 1. To represent in a picture or sculpture. 2. To represent in words; describe. [Middle English depicten, from Latin dêpingere, dêpict- : dê-, de- + pingere, to picture.] Synonyms: represent, delineate, depict, limn, picture, portray. The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to render or present a realistic image or likeness of": a statue representing a king; cave paintings that delineate horses and hunters; a cartoon depicting a sea monster; the personality of a great leader limned in words; a country landscape pictured in soft colors; a book portraying life in the Middle Ages.


dictated dictate verb dictated, dictating, dictates verb, transitive 1. To say or read aloud to be recorded or written by another: dictate a letter. 2. a. To prescribe with authority; impose: dictated the rules of the game. b. To control or command: "Foreign leaders were . . . dictated by their own circumstances, bound by the universal imperatives of politics" (Doris Kearns Goodwin). verb, intransitive 1. To say or read aloud material to be recorded or written by another: dictated for an hour before leaving for the day. 2. To issue orders or commands. [Latin dictâre, dictât-, frequentative of dìcere, to say.] Synonyms: dictate, decree, impose, ordain, prescribe. The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to set forth expressly and authoritatively": victors dictating the terms of surrender; confiscation of alien property decreed by the legislature; impose obedience; a separation seemingly ordained by fate; taxes prescribed by law.


formulated formulate verb, transitive formulated, formulating, formulates 1. a. To state as or reduce to a formula. b. To express in systematic terms or concepts. c. To devise or invent: formulate strategy. 2. To prepare according to a specified formula.


indited indite verb, transitive indited, inditing, indites 1. To write; compose. 2. To set down in writing. 3. Obsolete. To dictate. [Middle English enditen, from Old French enditer, from Vulgar Latin *indictâre : Latin in-, toward. IN- + Latin dictâre, to compose, to say habitually, frequentative of dìcere, to say.] - indite'ment noun - indit'er noun


made meaningful meaningful adjective 1. Having meaning, function, or purpose. 2. Fraught with meaning; significant: A meaningful glance.


mandated mandate noun 1. An authoritative command or instruction. 2.Acommand or an authorization given by a political electorate to its representative. 3. a. A commission from the League of Nations authorizing a member nation to administer a territory. b. A region under such administration. 4. Law. a. An order issued by a superior court or an official to a lower court. b. A contract by which one party agrees to perform services for another without payment. verb, transitive mandated, mandating, mandates 1. To assign (a colony or territory) to a specified nation under a mandate. 2. To make mandatory, as by law; decree or require: mandated desegregation of public schools. [Latin mandâtum, from neuter past participle of mandâre, to order.]


materialized by superhumans. materialize verb materialized, materializing, materializes verb, transitive 1. To cause to become real or actual: By building the house, we materialized a dream. 2. To cause to become materialistic: "Inequality has the natural and necessary effect . . . of materializing our upper class, vulgarizing our middle class, and brutalizing our lower class" (Matthew Arnold). verb, intransitive 1. To assume material or effective form: Their support on the eastern flank did not materialize. 2. To take physical form or shape. 3. To appear, especially suddenly. Synonyms: appear, emerge, issue, loom, materialize, show. The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to come into view": a ship appearing on the horizon; a star that emerged from behind a cloud; a diver issuing from the water; a peak that loomed through the mist; a flash of lightning that seemed to materialize from nowhere; a ruffle showing at the edge of the sleeve. Usage Note: In its original senses materialize is used intransitively to mean "to assume material form," as in Marley's ghost materialized before Scrooge's eyes, or transitively to mean "to cause to assume material form," as in Disney materialized his dream in a plot of orchard land in Orange County. But these uses are probably less common nowadays than two extended senses of the intransitive sense of the verb. In the first the meaning is roughly "to appear suddenly," as in No sooner had we set the menu down than a waiter materialized at our table. Some critics have labeled this use incorrect, but the criticism may suggest an overliteralism; used in this way, the verb has the sense "to appear as if by magic." Materialize also means "to take effective shape, come into existence," particularly as applied to things or events that have been foreseen or anticipated: The promised subsidies never materialized. It was thought the community would oppose the measure, but no new objections materialized. This usage has been criticized, but it is well established in reputable writing and follows a familiar pattern of metaphoric extension. The same logic that allows us to say The plans did not materialize allows us to use equivalent and unobjectionable paraphrases with expressions such as take form and take shape.


narrated narrate verb narrated, narrating, narrates verb, transitive a. To tell (a story, for example) in speech or writing. b. To give an account of (events, for example). verb, intransitive 1. To give an account or a description. 2. To supply a running commentary for a movie or performance. [Latin narrâre, narrât-, from gnârus, knowing.]


organized organize verb organized, organizing, organizes verb, transitive 1. To put together into an orderly, functional, structured whole. 2. a. To arrange in a coherent form; systematize: organized her thoughts before speaking. b. To arrange in a desired pattern or structure: "The painting is organized about a young reaper enjoying his noonday rest" (William Carlos Williams). 3. To arrange systematically for harmonious or united action: organize a strike. Synonyms: arrange, marshal, order, organize, sort, systematize. The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to distribute or dispose persons or things properly or methodically": arranging figures in numerical sequence; marshal all the relevant facts for the presentation; tried to order my chaotic life; organizing and coordinating fund-raising efforts; sorted the sweaters according to color; systematizing a vast assortment of rules into a cohesive whole. [Middle English organisen, from Old French organiser, from Medieval Latin organizâre, from Latin organum, tool, instrument.]


portrayed portray verb, transitive portrayed, portraying, portrays 1. To depict or represent pictorially; make a picture of. 2. To depict or describe in words. 3. To represent dramatically, as on the stage. [Middle English portraien, from Old French portraire : por-, forth (from Latin pro-, forth). See PRO-1 + traire, to draw (from Latin trahere, to drag).] Synonyms: represent, delineate, depict, limn, picture, portray. The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to render or present a realistic image or likeness of": a statue representing a king; cave paintings that delineate horses and hunters; a cartoon depicting a sea monster; the personality of a great leader limned in words; a country landscape pictured in soft colors; a book portraying life in the Middle Ages.


presented present verb, transitive presented, presenting, presents 1. a. To introduce, especially with formal ceremony. b. To introduce (a young woman) to society with conventional ceremony. 2. To bring before the public: present a play. 3. a. To make a gift or an award of. b. To make a gift to. 4. To offer for observation, examination, or consideration; show or display. [Middle English presenten, from Old French presenter, from Latin presentâre, to show, from praesêns, praesent-, present participle of praeesse, to be in front of.] Synonyms: offer, proffer, tender, present. These verbs are compared as they mean to put before another for acceptance or rejection. Offer is the basic general term in this group: the hostess offered us a cup of coffee. Many department stores offer television sets. I offered him some money for his help. "She offered no response" (Arnold Bennett). Proffer implies voluntary action motivated especially by courtesy or generosity: "Mr. van der Luyden . . . proffered to Newland low-voiced congratulations" (Edith Wharton). To tender is to offer formally; it may connote polite observance of amenities: She tendered her respects. The chief of staff is expected to tender his resignation this week. Present suggests formality and often a measure of ceremony: The impresario will present an expanded series of concerts next season. The ambassador presented her credentials to the monarch. "A footman entered, and presented . . . some mail on a silver tray" (Winston Churchill).


presented by authority of the Ancients of Days present verb, transitive presented, presenting, presents 1. a. To introduce, especially with formal ceremony. b. To introduce (a young woman) to society with conventional ceremony. 2. To bring before the public: present a play. 3. a. To make a gift or an award of. b. To make a gift to. 4. To offer for observation, examination, or consideration; show or display. Synonyms: offer, proffer, tender, present. These verbs are compared as they mean to put before another for acceptance or rejection. Offer is the basic general term in this group: the hostess offered us a cup of coffee. Many department stores offer television sets. I offered him some money for his help. "She offered no response" (Arnold Bennett). Proffer implies voluntary action motivated especially by courtesy or generosity: "Mr. van der Luyden . . . proffered to Newland low-voiced congratulations" (Edith Wharton). To tender is to offer formally; it may connote polite observance of amenities: She tendered her respects. The chief of staff is expected to tender his resignation this week. Present suggests formality and often a measure of ceremony: The impresario will present an expanded series of concerts next season. The ambassador presented her credentials to the monarch. "A footman entered, and presented . . . some mail on a silver tray" (Winston Churchill). [Middle English presenten, from Old French presenter, from Latin presentâre, to show, from praesêns, praesent-, present participle of praeesse, to be in front of.]


requested by request verb, transitive requested, requesting, requests 1. To express a desire for; ask for. 2. To ask (a person) to do something. noun 1. The act of asking. 2. Something asked for. by request In response to an expressed desire: We are offering these scarves for sale again by request. [From Middle English requeste, the act of requesting, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin (rês) requaesìta, (thing) requested, from Latin, feminine past participle of requìrere, to ask for.]


revealed religion noun A religion founded primarily on the revelations of God to humankind.


revealed reveal verb, transitive revealed, revealing, reveals 1. a. To make known (something concealed or secret): revealed a confidence. b. To bring to view; show. 2. To make known by supernatural or divine means: "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven" (Romans 1:18). [Middle English revelen, from Old French reveler, from Latin revêlâre : re-, re- + vêlâre, to cover (from vêlum, veil).] Synonyms: reveal, expose, disclose, divulge, betray. These verbs signify to make known what has been or ought to be kept from the knowledge of others. Reveal suggests uncovering what has been concealed: "He was glad it was to him she had revealed her secret" (Edith Wharton). To expose is to lay bare to public scrutiny: In a slip of the tongue the schemer exposed his true motivation. Disclose means to make known as if by removing a cover: The journalist refused to disclose the source of her information. Divulge often implies the improper revelation of something private or secret: "And whatsoever I shall see or hear in the course of my profession . . . if it be what should not be published abroad, I will never divulge, holding such things to be holy secrets" (Hippocratic Oath). To betray is to make known in a breach of trust or confidence: "A servant . . . betrayed their presence . . . to the Germans" (William Styron). The term can also mean to reveal against one's desire or will: Her comment betrayed annoyance.


revelation revelation noun 1. a. The act of revealing or disclosing. b. Something revealed, especially a dramatic disclosure of something not previously known or realized. 2. Theology. A manifestation of divine will or truth. 3. Revelation Abbr. Rev., Rv. Bible. [Middle English revelacion, from Old French revelation, from Latin revêlâtio, revêlâtion-, from revêlâtus, past participle of revêlâre, to reveal.] reveal verb, transitive revealed, revealing, reveals 1. a. To make known (something concealed or secret): revealed a confidence. b. To bring to view; show. 2. To make known by supernatural or divine means: "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven" (Romans 1:18). [Middle English revelen, from Old French reveler, from Latin revêlâre : re-, re- + vêlâre, to cover (from vêlum, veil).] - reveal'able adjective - reveal'er noun - reveal'ment noun Synonyms: reveal, expose, disclose, divulge, betray. These verbs signify to make known what has been or ought to be kept from the knowledge of others. Reveal suggests uncovering what has been concealed: "He was glad it was to him she had revealed her secret" (Edith Wharton). To expose is to lay bare to public scrutiny: In a slip of the tongue the schemer exposed his true motivation. Disclose means to make known as if by removing a cover: The journalist refused to disclose the source of her information. Divulge often implies the improper revelation of something private or secret: "And whatsoever I shall see or hear in the course of my profession . . . if it be what should not be published abroad, I will never divulge, holding such things to be holy secrets" (Hippocratic Oath). To betray is to make known in a breach of trust or confidence: "A servant . . . betrayed their presence . . . to the Germans" (William Styron). The term can also mean to reveal against one's desire or will: Her comment betrayed annoyance.


selected select verb selected, selecting, selects verb, transitive To take as a choice from among several; pick out. verb, intransitive To make a choice or selection. Synonyms: choose, select, elect, pick. These verbs mean to make a choice from a number of possibilities. Choose implies the use of judgment in taking one of several persons, things, or courses of action: "We do not choose survival as a value; it chooses us" (B.F. Skinner). Select stresses fastidiousness in choosing from a wide variety: Four skiers will be selected to represent each country. Elect strongly suggests deliberation in making a selection, usually between alternatives: I elected not to go. Pick, like select, indicates care in choosing: "Not only do I knock 'em out, I pick the round" (Muhammad Ali). [Latin sêligere, sêlêct- : sê-, apart + legere, to choose.]


sponsored sponsor noun 1. One who assumes responsibility for another person or a group during a period of instruction, apprenticeship, or probation. 2. One who vouches for the suitability of a candidate for admission. 3. A legislator who proposes and urges adoption of a bill. 4. One who presents a candidate for baptism or confirmation; a godparent. 5. One that finances a project or an event carried out by another person or group, especially a business enterprise that pays for radio or television programming in return for advertising time. verb, transitive sponsored, sponsoring, sponsors To act as a sponsor for. [Late Latin sponsor, sponsor in baptism, from Latin, surety, from sponsus, past participle of spondêre, to pledge.]


transcribed transcribe verb, transitive transcribed, transcribing, transcribes 1. To make a full written or typewritten copy of (dictated material, for example). 2. Computer Science. To transfer (information) from one recording and storing system to another. 3. Music. To adapt or arrange (a composition) for a voice or an instrument other than the original. 4. To record, usually on tape, for broadcast at a later date. 5. Linguistics. To represent (speech sounds) by phonetic symbols. 6. To translate or transliterate. [Latin trânscrìbere : trâns-, trans- + scrìbere, to write.] transliterate verb, transitive To represent (letters or words) in the corresponding characters of another alphabet. [TRANS- + Latin littera, lìtera, letter + -ATE.]


translated translate verb translated, translating, translates verb, transitive 1. To render in another language. 2. a. To put into simpler terms; explain or interpret. b. To express in different words; paraphrase. 3. a. To change from one form, function, or state to another; convert or transform: translate ideas into reality. b. To express in another medium. 4. To transfer from one place or condition to another. 5. To forward or retransmit (a telegraphic message). 6. a. Ecclesiastical. To transfer (a bishop) to another see. b. Theology. To convey to heaven without death. 7. Physics. To subject (a body) to translation. 8. Biology. To subject (messenger RNA) to translation. 9. Archaic. To enrapture. [Middle English translaten, from Old French translater, from Latin trânslâtus, past participle of trânsferre, to transfer : trâns-, trans- + lâtus, brought.]


transmitted transmit (tràns-mît', trànz-) verb transmitted, transmitting, transmits verb, transitive 1. To send from one person, thing, or place to another; convey. 2. To cause to spread; pass on: transmit an infection. 3. To impart or convey to others by heredity or inheritance; hand down. 4. To pass along (news or information); communicate. 5. a. Electronics. To send (a signal), as by wire or radio. b. Physics. To cause (a disturbance) to propagate through a medium. 6. To convey (force or energy) from one part of a mechanism to another. [Middle English transmitten, from Latin trânsmittere : trâns-, trans- + mittere, to send.]


unified unify verb, transitive & intransitive unified unifying, unifies To make into or become a unit; consolidate. [French unifier, from Old French, from Late Latin únificâre : Latin úni-, uni- + Latin -ficâre, -fy.]


written write verb wrote written) also writ writing, writes verb, transitive 1. a. To form (letters, words, or symbols) on a surface such as paper with an instrument such as a pen. b. To spell: How do you write your name? 2. To form (letters or words) in cursive style. 3. To compose and set down, especially in literary or musical form: write a poem; write a prelude. 4. To draw up in legal form; draft: write a will. 5. To fill in or cover with writing: write a check; wrote five pages in an hour. 6. To express in writing; set down: write one's thoughts. 7. To communicate by correspondence: wrote that she was planning to visit. 8. To underwrite, as an insurance policy. 9. To depict clearly; mark: "Utter dejection was written on every face" (Winston S. Churchill). 10. To ordain or prophesy: It was written that the empire would fall. 11. Computer Science. To record (data) on a storage device. verb, intransitive 1. To trace or form letters, words, or symbols on paper or another surface. 2. To produce written material, such as articles or books. 3. To compose a letter; communicate by mail. [Middle English writen, from Old English wrìtan.]