Vocabulary Words in the Foreword

absoluta n. (1). Space potency, as referred to on Uversa, a pre-reality, the free space presence of the Unqualified Absolute, responsive only to the personal grasp of the Universal Father. (469/30). ABSOLUTA 469: space potency is spoken of as ABSOLUTA.

Absolute n. 1. The Deity Absolute, the Unqualified Absolute, and the Universal Absolute, as viewed together from an infinity standpoint. (13/17-15/31, 484/23, 1261/1-1263/45). 2. The second highest level of reality, one which is beginningless, endless, timeless, and spaceless, changeless -- unqualifiedly eternal, truly "existential, but experiential as well. The ascending levels of reality are: finite (supreme), absonite (ultimate), absolute, and infinite. (2/38, 1261/1-1263/45). 3. God the Absolute, the third member of the second level of the Trinity of Trinities, the personality consequence of the final function of the Trinity Absolute. Absolute is the realization-attainment goal of all superabsonite beings. (16/31, 1172/1). 4. An idealistic doctrine which conceives of the whole of reality as one interconnected organic unity, spiritual in its nature. (1106/29, 1261/36). 5. The concept of Brahman and Brahman-Narayana in early Brahamic philosophy. (1030/16,22, 1031/27). 6. The concept of Buddha Eternal in Buddhist philosophy. (1040/15).

absolute adj. Of or pertaining to the Absolute, def. 2. (2/38).

absolute actuals The Eternal Son, the Paradise Isle, and the Conjoint Actor. Collectively, the A are known as the Triodity of Actuality. (1151/12).

absolute attitude of Deity That viewpoint on an issue which is most nearly expressed by the collective judgment of up to seven Divine Counselors, and which is then promulgated by a Universal Censor. (217/30).

Absolute Center = Universal Father. (92/2, 1147/46).

absolute cosmos The primal unqualified reality of infinity and eternity--limitless, boundless, never-beginning, and never-ending. (1261/27).

Absolute Deity 1. The being who will appear upon the unification of the second experiential Trinity, which consists of God the Supreme, God the Ultimate, and the unrevealed Consummator of Universe Destiny. (16/25). 2. = God, as used by the Chinese teacher Lao-tse. (1034/4).

absolute gravity = Paradise gravity. (125/42, 465/13, 470/23).

absolute-gravity circuits (4). Four circuits which irresistibly grasp all forms of force-energy, namely: the personality gravity of the Universal Father, the spirit gravity of the Eternal Son, the mind gravity of the Conjoint Actor, and the cosmic gravity of the Isle of Paradise. Absolute-gravity circuits are presence circuits which, like God, are independent of time and space. (131/40, 132/14, 237/17, 470/14).

absolute inevitability The threefold personalization of Deity as the Universal Father, the Eternal Son, and the Infinite Spirit. Elsewhere, the inescapable inevitability is stated to be the Trinity. (108/18, 185/8).

absolute integration A description of the cosmos infinite in the unimaginably distant future, when all potentials have been actualized, and in which the limitless possibilities of the three Absolutes have been experientially realized. (1167/44sec).

Absolute Intelligence = Infinite Spirit. (92/22).

absolute level A plane of reality which is beginningless, endless, timeless, and spaceless. See Absolute, def. 2. (2/38).

Absolute Mind A functional designation for the Infinite Spirit, describing his endowment of all universe intellect. (99/5, 639/21).

absolute mind The mind of the Infinite Spirit, inseparable from his personality. (102/1sec).

absolute of Absolutes = Universal Father, the personal cause of the Absolutes. (1148/4).

Absolute of energy = God; arguably, = Paradise. (1127/11).

Absolute Person = Eternal Son. (644/46).

Absolute Son = Eternal Son. (81/21).

Absolute Spirit Personality = Eternal Son. (79/4sec, 84/40).

Absolute Trinity The second experiential Trinity, in the unification of which God the Absolute appears, and which consists of God the Supreme, God the Ultimate, and the unrevealed Consummator of Universe Destiny. (13/21, 16/21, 1171/14).

absoluteness n. The state of being absolute. (1237/23).

Absolutes n.pl. 1. Functional differentiations of the I AM into personal, impersonal, coordinational, potential and actual segments. The Absolutes are: Universal Father, Eternal Son, Infinite Spirit, Isle of Paradise, Deity Absolute, Unqualified Absolute, and Universal Absolute. The Absolutes eternalize the basic foundations for all universe reality. (13/17-15/31, 56/20, 1146/14-1151/36, 1153/451157/10,1434/12). 2. The level of reality connoted by the eternity presence of the seven existential Absolutes. (1163/3).

Absolutes of Infinity = Absolutes, def. 1. (640/5).

Absolutes of potentiality Deity Absolute, Unqualified Absolute, and Universal Absolute. The association of these Absolutes of potentiality is the Triodity of Potentiality. (55/46, 1151/23).

absolutizer n. (1). That which makes absolute. The absolutizer of the qualified is the Deity Absolute, the destiny inceptor. (1156/31).
ABSOLUTIZER 1156: qualifier of the absolute and the absolutizer of the qualified the destiny inceptor.

absolutism n. (4). See personality absolutism. (86/36, 98/110, 108/4, 111/29).

absolutum n. (2). The literal substance of Paradise, a homogeneous organization of space potency not found elsewhere. Absolutum consists in Stationary systems of reality, neither dead nor alive, and is the original non-spiritual expression of the First Source and Center. (120/9, 1149/33).

absonite n. (77). 1. A level of reality intervening between the absolute and the finite, levels of supertime and transcended space where God functions as Ultimate. The absonite level of reality is characterized by things and beings without beginnings or endings, and by the transcendence of time and space. (2/32, 7/20, 12/43, 350/24354/34, 1165/41-1167/10, 1260/30). 2. = absoniter. (351/14).

absonite adj. Of or pertaining to the absonite, def. 1. (640/40).
ABSONITE-SUPERPERSONAL 4: realization of the synthesized absonite-superpersonal, time-space-transcended,

absonite administrators Beings who will become active at the superuniverse level upon its settlement in light and life. The then exalted Unqualified Supervisors of the Supreme will come into direct contact with the absonite administrators. (636/25).

absonite architects = Architects of the Master Universe. (1165/42).

absonite regime of the master universe overcontrollers Probably, the government of the Architects of the Master Universe on the absonite level. (262/15).

absoniters n. (1). A being who is eventuated on the absonite level. Absoniters are not created, they simply are. (2/33). ABSONITERS 2: the transcendence of time and space. Absoniters are not created; they are eventuated

absonitize v.i. (3). To come into being in the absonite. An absoniter is absonitized in the absonite in a sense similar to mortals being personalized in the finite. (334/27, 347/5, 352/10). ABSONITIZE 352: but that this being failed to absonitize, experiencing personality seizure by the Universal

absonity n. (9). 1. A state of being related to the absonite as finity is to the finite. (16/2, 242/27, 332/45, 343/38, 352/12,14). 2. Wisdom on the absonite level. (14/23, 1281/33). 3. A transcendental spirit bestowable by God the Ultimate. (401/30).

actual, actualized, actualizes, actualizing ac-tu-al (akchoo-l) adj. 1. Existing and not merely potential or possible. See Synonyms at real1. 2. Being, existing, or acting at the present moment; current. 3. Based on fact: an actual account of the accident. [Middle English, from Old French, active, from Late Latin actualis, from agere, act-, to drive, do. ac-tu-al-ize (akchoo--liz) v. ac-tu-al-ized, ac-tu-al-iz-ing, ac-tu-al-iz-es. v. tr. 1. To realize in action or make real: "More flexible life patterns could . . . nurture and renew our spirits through opportunities to actualize personal dreams" (Fred Best) . 2. To describe or portray realistically. v. intr. To become actual. --ac'tu-al-i-za'tion (--li-zashn) . n.

admonishes ad-mon-ish (ad-monish) v. tr. ad-mon-ished, ad-mon-ish-ing, ad-mon-ish-es. 1. To reprove gently but earnestly. 2. To counsel (another) against something to be avoided; caution. 3. To remind of something forgotten or disregarded, as an obligation or a responsibility. [Middle English amonishen, admonishen, alteration of amonesten, from Old French amonester, admonester, from Vulgar Latin *admonestare, from Latin admonere : ad-, ad- + monere, to warn. See men-1. ] --ad-mon'ish-er n. --ad-mon'ish-ing-ly adv. --ad-mon'ish-ment n. SYNONYM: admonish, reprove, rebuke, reprimand, reproach These verbs refer to adverse criticism intended as a corrective or caution. Admonish implies the giving of advice or a warning so that a fault can be rectified or a danger avoided: "A gallows erected on an eminence admonished the offenders of the fate that awaited them" (William Hickling Prescott) . Reprove usually suggests gentle criticism and constructive intent: With a quick look the teacher reproved the child for whispering in class. Rebuke and reprimand both refer to sharp, often angry criticism; of the two reprimand more frequently implies formal or official censure: "Some of the most heated criticism . . . has come from the Justice Department, which rarely rebukes other agencies in public" (Howard Kurtz) . "A committee at [the university] asked its president to reprimand a scientist who tested gene-altered bacteria on trees" (New York Times) . Reproach usually refers to regretful or unhappy criticism arising from a sense of disappointment: "Even if I had done wrong you should not have reproached me in public--people wash their dirty linen at home" (Napoleon Bonaparte) . To notify of imminent danger or risk. v. warn, admonish, alarm, alert, caution, forewarn, tip off. To subject to criticism or accusation. v. criticize, reprimand, chide, rebuke, reproach, scold, censure, reprove, admonish, call down, dress down, bawl out, chew out (informal) , upbraid, berate, denounce, tell off, lambaste, rap, take apart, condemn, skin alive, rake over the coals. Antonyms: commend, compliment, praise, applaud.

antecedent an-te-ce-dent (anti-sednt) adj. Going before; preceding. n. 1. One that precedes another. 2. A preceding occurrence, cause, or event. See Synonyms at cause. antecedents. The important events and occurrences in one's early life. 3. antecedents. One's ancestors. 4. Grammar. The word, phrase, or clause to which a pronoun refers. 5. Mathematics. The first term of a ratio. 6. Logic. The conditional member of a hypothetical proposition. --an'te-ce'dent-ly adv. Something that produces a result : cause, antecedent, determinant, occasion, reason, source, root. Existing or coming before in time, place, rank, or sequence. adj. previous, antecedent, anterior, earlier, early, former, historic, precedent, preceding, prior. Antonyms: following, subsequent, later.

appellations ap-pel-la-tion (ap-lashn) n. 1. A name, title, or designation. See Synonyms at name. 2. The act of naming. [Middle English appelacion, from Old French appelation, from Latin appellatio, appellation-, from appellatus, past participle of appellare, to entreat. The word or words by which one is called or identified : name, appellation, appellative, cognomen, denomination, designation, handle (slang) , moniker (informal) , nickname, tag, epithet. A single unit of meaning formed by a sound or sounds : word, appellation, designation, expression, idiom, name, term, locution, utterance.

appropriation ap-pro-pri-a-tion (-propre-ashn) n. 1. The act of appropriating. 2. Something appropriated, especially public funds set aside for a specific purpose. A legislative act authorizing the expenditure of a designated amount of public funds for a specific purpose. A sum of money granted for a definite purpose : grant, allowance, appropriation, award, contribution, donation, endowment, financial aid, scholarship, stipend, subsidy, subvention, grant-in-aid. A ready taking up of something : espousal, adoption, embracing, appropriation, promotion. Antonyms: rejection, renouncement. The act of taking quick and forcible possession : confiscation, annexation, appropriation, capture, commandeering, expropriation, impounding, seizure, sequestration, usurpation.

associable as-so-ci-a-ble (-soshe--bl, -sh-bl) adj. That can be associated: words associable with politics. --as-so'ci-a-bil'i-ty or as-so'ci-a-ble-ness n.

assumptions as-sump-tion (-sumpshn) n. 1. The act of taking to or upon oneself: assumption of an obligation. 2. The act of taking over: assumption of command. 3. The act of taking for granted: assumption of a false theory. 4. Something taken for granted or accepted as true without proof; a supposition: a valid assumption. 5. Presumption; arrogance. 6. Logic. A minor premise. 7. Assumption Theology. The bodily taking up of the Virgin Mary into heaven after her death. A Christian feast celebrating this event. August 15, the day on which this feast is observed. [Middle English assumpcion, from Latin assumptio, assumption-, adoption, from assumptus, past participle of assumere, to adopt. See ASSUME. ] Something taken to be true without proof : presupposition, assumption, postulate, postulation, premise, presumption, supposition, thesis, theory, hypothesis, speculation, conjecture. Something taken as true for the sake of argument or investigation : hypothesis, supposition, assumption, premise, theory, thesis. A judgment arrived at by guessing : conjecture, assumption, expectation, guess, postulation, presumption, supposition, speculation, suspicion, theory, hypothesis, inference, surmise. Antonyms: fact, surety, certainty.

aught (ot) pron. Anything whatever: "Neither of his parents had aught but praise for him" (Louis Auchincloss) . adv. Archaic. In any respect; at all. [Middle English, from Old English auht. See aiw-. ]

capacity ca-pac-i-ty (k-pasi-te) n. pl. ca-pac-i-ties. 1. The ability to receive, hold, or absorb. A measure of this ability; volume. 2. The maximum amount that can be contained: a trunk filled to capacity. 3. Ability to perform or produce; capability. The maximum or optimum amount that can be produced: factories operating below capacity. 4. The power to learn or retain knowledge; mental ability. 5. Innate potential for growth, development, or accomplishment; faculty. See Synonyms at ability. 6. The quality of being suitable for or receptive to specified treatment: the capacity of elastic to be stretched. 7. The position in which one functions; role: in your capacity as sales manager. 8. Legal qualification or authority: the capacity to make an arrest. 9. Electricity. Capacitance. adj. Filling a space with the most it can hold: a capacity crowd at the concert. [Middle English capacite, from Old French, from Latin capacitas, from capax, capac-, spacious. See CAPACIOUS. ] The power to perform a task : capability, capacity, ability, competence, facility, faculty, knack, means, might, mind, potential, skill, wherewithal. Antonyms: inadequacy, incompetence, ineptitude, inability.

circumscribed cir-cum-scribe (surkm-skrib) v. tr. cir-cum-scribed, cir-cum-scrib-ing, cir-cum-scribes. 1. To draw a line around; encircle. 2. To limit narrowly; restrict. 3. To determine the limits of; define. See Synonyms at limit. 4. To enclose (a polygon or polyhedron) within a configuration of lines, curves, or surfaces so that every vertex of the enclosed object is incident on the enclosing configuration. To erect (such a configuration) around a polygon or polyhedron: circumscribe a circle around a square. [Middle English circumscriben, from Latin circumscribere : circum-, circum- + scribere, to write. See skribh-. ] --cir'cum-scrib'a-ble adj. --cir'cum-scrib'er n. To establish the limits of. v. delimit, fix, bound, circumscribe, define, mark out, mark off, stake out, delineate, demarcate, limit, outline, measure, pace off, set, specify, determine, frame, regulate, restrict.

comprehensible, comprehension com-pre-hen-si-ble (kompri-hens-bl) adj. Readily comprehended or understood; intelligible. [Latin comprehensibilis, from comprehensus, past participle of comprehendere, to comprehend.] --com'pre-hen'si-bil'i-ty or com'pre-hen'si-ble-ness n. --com'pre-hen'si-bly adv. Marked by or involving inference. adj. inferential, indirect, inductive, inferable, understandable, comprehensible. Describing written or oral communication that is easily understood. adj. intelligible, clear, understandable, crystal clear, comprehensible, direct, limpid, perspicuous, plain, unambiguous. Antonyms: unintelligible, unclear, incomprehensible, ambiguous, indecipherable. Capable of being read. adj. readable, legible, comprehensible, understandable. Antonyms: unreadable, incomprehensible, illegible.

conceptual, conceptualize con-cep-tu-al (kn-sepchoo-l) adj. Of, consisting of, or relating to concepts or conception: conceptual discussions that antedated development of the new product. [Medieval Latin conceptualis, from Late Latin conceptus, a thought.] --con-cep'tu-al-ly adv. con-cep-tu-al-ize (kn-sepchoo--liz) v. con-cep-tu-al-ized, con-cep-tu-al-iz-ing, con-cep-tu-al-iz-es. v. tr. To form a concept or concepts of, and especially to interpret in a conceptual way: "Efforts to conceptualize the history and structure of the universe were already running into trouble because . . . the universe was not as uniform as had been assumed" (John Noble Wilford) . v. intr. To form concepts. --con-cep'tu-al-i-za'tion (-sepchoo--li-zashn) . n. --con-cep'tu-al-iz'er n. To form mental images of. v. visualize, conceptualize, fantasize, conceive, conjure up, envisage, envision, image, imagine, dream up, picture, see, vision.

concession con-ces-sion (kn-seshn) n. 1. The act of conceding. 2. Something, such as a point previously claimed in argument, that is later conceded. An acknowledgment or admission. 3. A grant of a tract of land made by a government or other controlling authority in return for stipulated services or a promise that the land will be used for a specific purpose. 4. The privilege of maintaining a subsidiary business within certain premises. The space allotted for such a business. The business itself: had an ice-cream concession in the subway station. [Middle English, from Latin concessio, concession-, from concessus, past participle of concedere, to concede.] --con-ces'sion-al adj. --con-ces'sion-ar'y (-sesh-nere) . adj. The act of admitting to something : admission, acknowledgment, concession, confession, disclosure, divulgence, owning, revelation. Antonyms: denial, disavowal, negation, rejection. The act of submitting to another : surrender, acquiescence, capitulation, cession, ceding, concession, giving in, resignation, submission, yielding. Antonyms: resistance, rebellion, defiance. An accommodation made in light of extenuating circumstances : concession, allowance, consideration, abatement, compromise.

configuration, configure con-fig-ure (kn-figyr) v. tr. con-fig-ured, con-fig-ur-ing, con-fig-ures. To design, arrange, set up, or shape with a view to specific applications or uses: an internal security vehicle that was configured for rough terrain. [Middle English configuren, from Old French configurer, from Latin configurare : com-, com- + figurare, to form (from figura, shape. See dheigh-. ) . ] To put into a proper order, relationship, or sequence. v. arrange, array, order, organize, systematize, rank, class, classify, categorize, group, sort, codify, place, position, type, catalogue, alphabetize, graduate, index, size, grade, space, collate, configure, file, interfile, reorganize, reorder. Antonyms: disorder, disorganize, disarrange, jumble, disarray. con-fig-u-ra-tion (kn-figy-rashn) n. 1. Arrangement of parts or elements. The form, as of a figure, determined by the arrangement of its parts or elements. See Synonyms at form. 2. Psychology. Gestalt. 3. Chemistry. The structural arrangement of atoms in a compound or molecule. --con-fig'u-ra'tion-al-ly adv. --con-fig'u-ra'tive or con-fig'u-ra'tion-al adj. The external appearance or structure of an object : shape, cast, configuration, figure, form, conformation, contour, outline, silhouette, profile. Physical makeup or structure : build, constitution, physique, configuration, formation, construction, composition, texture.

conspire con-spire (kn-spir) v. con-spired, con-spir-ing, con-spires. v. intr. 1. To plan together secretly to commit an illegal or wrongful act or accomplish a legal purpose through illegal action. 2. To join or act together; combine: factors that conspired to delay the project. v. tr. To plan or plot secretly. [Middle English conspiren, from Old French, from Latin conspirare : com-, com- + spirare, to breathe. ] --con-spir'er n. --con-spir'ing-ly adv. To form a plan for. v. plot, design, scheme, devise, draw up, conspire, intrigue, plan. To work out a plan to do something illegal or immoral. v. scheme, cabal, collude, connive, conspire, intrigue, machinate, mastermind, plot, contrive.

context con-text (kontekst) n. 1. The part of a text or statement that surrounds a particular word or passage and determines its meaning. 2. The circumstances in which an event occurs; a setting. [Middle English, composition, from Latin contextus, from past participle of contexere, to join together : com-, com- + texere, to weave.] The surrounding conditions and circumstances : environment, ambiance, aura, atmosphere, backdrop, background, climate, frame of reference, medium, milieu, setting, sphere, surroundings, world, context.

convergent con-verge (kn-vurj) v. con-verged, con-verg-ing, con-verg-es.v. intr. 1. To tend toward or approach an intersecting point: lines that converge. To come together from different directions; meet: The avenues converge at a central square. 2. To tend toward or achieve union or a common conclusion or result: In time, our views and our efforts converged. 3. Mathematics. To approach a limit.v. tr. To cause to converge. [Late Latin convergere, to incline together : Latin com-, com- + Latin vergere, to incline.] con-ver-gence (kn-vurjns) n. 1. The act, condition, quality, or fact of converging. 2. Mathematics. The property or manner of approaching a limit, such as a point, line, surface, or value. 3. The point of converging; a meeting place: a town at the convergence of two rivers. 4. Physiology. The coordinated turning of the eyes inward to focus on an object at close range. 5. Biology. The adaptive evolution of superficially similar structures, such as the wings of birds and insects, in unrelated species subjected to similar environments. In this sense, also calledconvergent evolution. --con-ver'gent adj. The act or fact of coming together : junction, combination, concourse, confluence, conjunction, connection, convergence, intersection, joining, juncture, linking, meeting, union.Antonyms: separation, division.

cosmic, cosmically cos-mic (kozmik) also cos-mi-cal (-mi-kl) adj. 1. Of or relating to the universe, especially as distinct from Earth. 2. Infinitely or inconceivably extended; vast: "a coming together of heads of government to take up the cosmic business of nations" (Meg Greenfield) . [Greek kosmikos, from kosmos, universe.] --cos'mi-cal-ly adv. Of or relating to the universe. adj.cosmic, galactic, universal, extraterrestrial.

definitive de-fin-i-tive (di-fini-tiv) adj. 1. Precisely defined or explicit. 2. Supplying or being a final settlement or decision; conclusive. See Synonyms at decisive. 3. Authoritative and complete: a definitive biography. See Usage Note at definite. 4. Biology. Fully formed or developed, as an organ or structure.n. Grammar. A word that defines or limits, such as the definite article or a demonstrative pronoun.--de-fin'i-tive-ly adv. --de-fin'i-tive-ness n. Serving to end debate or uncertainty. adj.decisive, conclusive, definitive, final, peremptory.Antonyms: inconclusive, indefinite, open-ended. Definitely and specifically stated; unambiguous. adj.express, categorical, clear, definite, definitive, exact, explicit, precise, specific, strict, unequivocal.Antonyms: ambiguous, unclear, equivocal, misleading, indefinite.

denote de-note (di-not) v. tr. de-not-ed, de-not-ing, de-notes. 1. To mark; indicate: a frown that denoted increasing impatience. 2. To serve as a symbol or name for the meaning of; signify: A flashing yellow light denotes caution. 3. To signify directly; refer to specifically. [French denoter, from Latin denotare : de-, de- + notare, to mark.] --de-not'a-ble adj. --de-no'tive adj. USAGE NOTES: Denote means "to mark" or "to signify directly"; connote means "to suggest or convey to the mind what is not explicit." In speaking of words or expressions, denote describes the relation between the expression and the thing it conventionally names, whereas connote describes the relation between the word and the images or associations it evokes. Thus, the word Christmas denotes the holiday celebrated on December 25 and connotes turkey, mistletoe, and chestnuts roasting on an open fire. To state in detail. v. specify, itemize, define, indicate, designate, enumerate, name, stipulate, cite, adduce, denote, describe, detail, particularize. To lead to by logical reference. v. imply, suggest, point to, hint at, indicate, presuppose, presume, evidence, denote. To give a name or title to. v. designate, baptize, trademark, brand, call, christen, denominate, denote, dub, entitle, label, name, nickname, stamp, tag, term, title. To have or convey a particular idea. v. mean, connote, denote, import, intend, signify, add up to, spell, stand for, suggest. To act as a symbol of. v. signify, denote, mean, symbolize.

depletion de-ple-tion (di-pleshn) n. 1. The act or process of depleting. 2. The state of being depleted; exhaustion. 3. The gradual use or consumption of a resource, especially a natural resource. de-plete (di-plet) v. tr. de-plet-ed, de-plet-ing, de-pletes. To decrease the fullness of; use up or empty out. [Latin deplere, deplet-, to empty : de-, de- + plere, to fill.] --de-plet'a-ble adj. SYNONYM: deplete, drain, exhaust, impoverish, enervate These verbs all mean to weaken severely by removing something essential. Deplete refers to using up gradually and only hints at harmful consequences: I always replenish my food supply before it is depleted. Drain suggests reduction by gradual drawing off and is stronger in implying harm: War often drains a nation's economy. Exhaust stresses reduction to a point of no further usefulness: "The resources of civilization are not yet exhausted" (William Ewart Gladstone) . Impoverish refers to severe reduction of resources or qualities essential to adequate functioning: "His death has eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure" (Samuel Johnson) . Enervate refers to weakening or destruction of vitality or strength: Idleness enervates the will to succeed.

derived de-rive (di-riv) v. de-rived, de-riv-ing, de-rives.v. tr. 1. To obtain or receive from a source. 2. To arrive at by reasoning; deduce or infer: derive a conclusion from facts. 3. To trace the origin or development of (a word) . 4. Chemistry. To produce or obtain (a compound) from another substance by chemical reaction. v. intr. To issue from a source; originate. [Middle English deriven, to be derived from, from Old French deriver, from Latin derivare, to derive, draw off : de-, de- + rivus, stream. See rei-.] --de-riv'a-ble adj. --de-riv'er n.

descension de-scent (di-sent) n. 1. The act or an instance of descending. 2. A way down. 3. A downward incline or passage; a slope. 4. Hereditary derivation; lineage: a person of African descent. One generation of a specific lineage. 5. The fact or process of coming down or being derived from a source: a paper tracing the descent of the novel from old picaresque tales. Development in form or structure during transmission from an original source. 6. Law. Transference of property by inheritance. 7. A lowering or decline, as in status or level: Her career went into a rapid descent after the charges of misconduct. 8. A sudden visit or attack; an onslaught. [Middle English, from Old French, from descendre, to descend.]

designated, designation des-ig-nate (dezig-nat) v. tr. des-ig-nat-ed, des-ig-nat-ing, des-ig-nates. 1. To indicate or specify; point out. 2. To give a name or title to; characterize. 3. To select and set aside for a duty, an office, or a purpose. See Synonyms at allocate. See Synonyms at appoint.adj. (-nit) . Appointed but not yet installed in office: the commissioner designate. [Latin designare, designat- : de-, de- + signare, to mark (from signum, sign.] --des'ig-na'tive or des'ig-na-to'ry (-n-tore, -tore) . adj. --des'ig-na'tor n. To state in detail. v. specify, itemize, define, indicate, designate, enumerate, name, stipulate, cite, adduce, denote, describe, detail, particularize. To describe with a word or term. v.label, title, name, term, dub, christen, call, designate, peg, tag. To intend or set aside for a specific purpose. v. earmark, consecrate, dedicate, destine, devote, mark, allocate, allot, apportion, appropriate, designate, assign. To authorize and send (a person) as one's representative. v. delegate, name, designate, appoint as one's representative. To give a name or title to. v. designate, baptize, trademark, brand, call, christen, denominate, denote, dub, entitle, label, name, nickname, stamp, tag, term, title. To set off by or as if by a mark indicating ownership or manufacture. v. brand, trademark, designate, docket, earmark, hallmark, imprint, label, mark, stamp, tab, tag. To make a choice. v. choose, appoint, ballot, cast, cull, decide, designate, determine, elect, endorse, hand-pick, name, opt, nominate, pick, select, settle upon, take, vote. To place in or assign to a position or place. v.appoint, consign, station, position, post, install, instate, invest, seat, designate, ensconce, enthrone, establish, locate, house, quarter, headquarter, base, billet, domicile, garrison. des-ig-na-tion (dezig-nashn) n. 1. The act of designating; a marking or pointing out. 2. Nomination or appointment. 3. A distinguishing name or title. The word or words by which one is called or identified : name, appellation, appellative, cognomen, denomination, designation, handle (slang) , moniker (informal) , nickname, tag, epithet. A single unit of meaning formed by a sound or sounds : word, appellation, designation, expression, idiom, name, term, locution, utterance. The act of selecting for an office or position : appointment, electing, assignment, designation, naming, choosing, nomination, selection.

devoid de-void (di-void) adj. Completely lacking; destitute or empty: a novel devoid of wit and inventiveness. [Middle English, past participle of devoiden, to remove, eliminate, from Old French desvoidier : des-, de- + voidier, to empty (from voide, empty.)] Containing no matter. adj. null, devoid, vacant, depleted, empty, void, hollow, bare.

differential, differentially, differentials, differentiation dif-fer-en-tial (dif-renshl) adj. 1. Of, relating to, or showing a difference. 2. Constituting or making a difference; distinctive. 3. Dependent on or making use of a specific difference or distinction. 4. Mathematics. Of or relating to differentiation. 5. Involving differences in speed or direction of motion.n. 1. Mathematics. An infinitesimal increment in a variable. The product of the derivative of a function containing one variable multiplied by the increment of the independent variable. 2. Differential gear. 3. A difference in wage rate or in price. --dif'fer-en'tial-ly adv. dif-fer-en-ti-ate (dif-renshe-at) v. dif-fer-en-ti-at-ed, dif-fer-en-ti-at-ing, dif-fer-en-ti-ates. v. tr. 1. To constitute the distinction between: subspecies that are differentiated by the markings on their wings. 2. To perceive or show the difference in or between; discriminate. 3. To make different by alteration or modification. 4. Mathematics. To calculate the derivative or differential of (a function) .v. intr. 1. To become distinct or specialized; acquire a different character. 2. To make distinctions; discriminate. 3. Biology. To undergo a progressive, developmental change to a more specialized form or function. Used especially of embryonic cells or tissues. --dif'fer-en'ti-a'tion n. To recognize as being different. v. differentiate, contradistinguish, contrast, discriminate, distinguish, pick out, tell apart. To make noticeable or different. v. individualize, particularize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, mark, qualify, set apart, set off, personalize, single out, type. To compare so as to reveal differences. v.contrast, compare, contradistinguish, judge, juxtapose, oppose, differentiate, distinguish. To change or alter in structure, character, or substance. v.transform, metamorphose, mutate, transfigure, transmute, permute, modify, adjust, adapt, convert, remake, reshape, customize, differentiate, diversify, refashion, reform, remodel, restyle, variegate, vary.

divergent di-ver-gent (di-vurjnt, di-) adj. 1. Drawing apart from a common point; diverging. 2. Departing from convention. 3. Differing from another: a divergent opinion. 4. Mathematics. Failing to approach a limit; not convergent.--di-ver'gent-ly adv. Not having relevance to the topic at hand. adj.irrelevant, sidetracked, digressive, divergent, extraneous, immaterial, inconsequential, nongermane, peripheral, tangential, unrelated.Antonyms: relevant, germane, important. Marked by or given to digression. adj.digressive, discursive, divergent, excursive, tangential, roundabout.Antonyms: to the point, pointed.

diversification di-ver-si-fy (di-vurs-fi, di-) v. di-ver-si-fied, di-ver-si-fy-ing, di-ver-si-fies.v. tr. 1. To give variety to; vary: diversify a menu. To extend (business activities) into disparate fields. 2. To distribute (investments) among different companies or securities in order to limit losses in the event of a fall in a particular market or industry.v. intr. To spread out activities or investments, especially in business. [Middle English diversifien, from Old French diversifier, from Medieval Latin diversificare : Latin diversus. Latin -ficare, -fy.] --di-ver'si-fi-ca'tion (-fi-kashn). n. To change or alter in structure, character, or substance. v.transform, metamorphose, mutate, transfigure, transmute, permute, modify, adjust, adapt, convert, remake, reshape, customize, differentiate, diversify, refashion, reform, remodel, restyle, variegate, vary.

dynamic dy-nam-ic (di-namik) adj. also dy-nam-i-cal (-i-kl) . 1. Of or relating to energy or to objects in motion. Of or relating to the study of dynamics. 2. Characterized by continuous change, activity, or progress: a dynamic market. 3. Marked by intensity and vigor; forceful. See Synonyms at active. 4. Of or relating to variation of intensity, as in musical sound. n. 1. An interactive system or process, especially one involving competing or conflicting forces: "the story of a malign dynamic between white prejudice and black autonomy" (Edmund S. Morgan) . 2. A force, especially political, social, or psychological: the main dynamic behind the revolution. [French dynamique, ultimately from Greek dunamikos, powerful, from dunamis, power, from dunasthai, to be able.] --dy-nam'i-cal-ly adv. Full of spirit and energy. adj.lively, alive, animated, dynamic, energetic, high-spirited, jaunty, perky, sprightly, vibrant, vigorous, vivacious, zestful, zesty, spirited. Antonyms: lethargic, tired, sluggish. Capable of moving or of being moved. adj. mobile, active, dynamic, kinetic, motile, motive, moving, propulsive, unfixed, unstationary. Antonyms: immobile, unmoving, stationary, fixed. Having the power to persuade or convince. adj. persuasive, cogent, convincing, suasive, influential, compelling, forceful, dynamic, charismatic, winning. Antonyms: unpersuasive, unconvincing.

statics stat-ic (statik) adj. 1. Having no motion; being at rest; quiescent. Fixed; stationary. 2. Physics. Of or relating to bodies at rest or forces that balance each other. 3. Electricity. Of, relating to, or producing stationary charges; electrostatic. 4. Of, relating to, or produced by random radio noise.n. 1. Random noise, such as crackling in a receiver or specks on a television screen, produced by atmospheric disturbance of the signal. 2. Informal. Back talk. Interference; obstruction. Angry or heated criticism. [New Latin staticus, relating to weight, from Greek statikos, causing to stand, from statos, standing.] --stat'i-cal adj. --stat'i-cal-ly adv. Not subject to change or variation. adj.constant, invariable, continuous, fixed, reliable, stable, static, steady, unchangeable, unchanging, unvarying.Antonyms: inconstant, changeable, varying, unfixed. Not moving or flowing. adj.stagnant, stagnating, stale, inert, sluggish, static, dead.Antonyms: flowing.

emanation em-a-na-tion (em-nashn) n. 1. The act or an instance of emanating. 2. Something that issues from a source; an emission. Chemistry. Any of several radioactive gases that are isotopes of radon and are products of radioactive decay. --em'a-na'tion-al adj. A smoky or vaporous substance given off : emission, emanation, exhaust, effluvium, miasma, discharge, fumes, pollutant, impurity, waste. A gradual flow or loss from an enclosed area : leak, dribble, drip, emanation, escape, extravasation (technical), leakage, ooze, seepage, trickle, discharge, drain. The act of sending out : emission, discharge, emanation, excretion, effluent, effusion, generation, release, secretion.

embraced em-brace (em-bras) v. em-braced, em-brac-ing, em-brac-es.v. tr. 1. To clasp or hold close with the arms, usually as an expression of affection. 2. To surround; enclose: We allowed the warm water to embrace us. To twine around: a trellis that was embraced by vines. 3. To include as part of something broader. 4. To take up willingly or eagerly: embrace a social cause. 5. To avail oneself of: "I only regret, in my chilled age, certain occasions and possibilities I didn't embrace" (Henry James) .v. intr. To join in an embrace. n. 1. An act of holding close with the arms, usually as an expression of affection; a hug. 2. An enclosure or encirclement: caught in the jungle's embrace. 3. Eager acceptance: your embrace of Catholicism. [Middle English embracen, from Old French embracer : en-, in. + brace, the two arms.] --em-brace'a-ble adj. --em-brace'ment n. An act or means of holding something : grip, clasp, clinch, clutch, embrace, grasp, handle, hold, hug, squeeze, handgrip. To put one's arms around affectionately. v. embrace, clasp, clinch, enfold, press, cradle, cuddle, hold, hug, squeeze, grasp. To touch in order to express love or affection. v. caress, cuddle, fondle, pet, stroke, hold close, embrace, hug, pat. Antonyms: hit, beat, slap, thrash. To take (something given or offered) willingly. v. accept, embrace, jump at, leap at, receive, welcome, adopt. Antonyms: refuse, reject, decline, spurn. To join forces with. v. ally, embrace, team up, throw in with, join up with. To have as integral parts. v. comprise, consist of, contain, embody, embrace, encompass, have, include, incorporate, involve, subsume, take in. To take as one's own something originated by another. v. adopt, embrace, espouse, take on, take up.

emergent energy e-mer-gent (i-murjnt) adj. 1. Coming into view, existence, or notice: emergent spring shoots; an emergent political leader. Emerging: emergent nations. 2. Rising above a surrounding medium, especially a fluid. 3. Demanding prompt action; urgent. 4. Occurring as a consequence; resultant. n. One that is coming into view or existence: "The giant redwoods ... outstrip the emergents of the rain forest, which rarely reach two hundred feet" (Catherine Caulfield). en-er-gy (enr-je) n.pl. en-er-gies. 1. The capacity for work or vigorous activity; vigor; power. See Synonyms at strength. 2. Exertion of vigor or power: a project requiring a great deal of time and energy. Vitality and intensity of expression: a speech delivered with energy and emotion. 3. Usable heat or power: Each year Americans consume a high percentage of the world's energy. A source of usable power, such as petroleum or coal. 4. Physics. The capacity of a physical system to do work.n. attributive. Often used to modify another noun: energy conservation; energy efficiency; an energy czar. [French energie, from Late Latin energia, from Greek energeia, from energos, active : en-, in, at. + ergon, work.]

encompassing, encompassment en-com-pass (en-kumps) v. tr. en-com-passed, en-com-pass-ing, en-com-pass-es. 1. To form a circle or ring around; surround. See Synonyms at surround. 2. To enclose; envelop. 3. To constitute or include: a survey that encompassed a wide range of participants. 4. To accomplish; achieve. --en-com'pass-ment n. To have as integral parts. v. comprise, consist of, contain, embody, embrace, encompass, have, include, incorporate, involve, subsume, take in. To encircle with or as if with a band. v. band, begird, belt, cincture, encompass, engird, gird, girdle, ring.

endeavor en-deav-or (en-devr) n. 1. A conscientious or concerted effort toward an end; an earnest attempt. 2. Purposeful or industrious activity; enterprise. Effort. v. en-deav-ored, en-deav-or-ing, en-deav-ors.v. tr. To attempt (fulfillment of a responsibility or an obligation, for example) by employment or expenditure of effort: endeavored to improve the quality of life in the inner city.v. intr. To work with a set or specified goal or purpose. [Middle English endevour, from endeveren, to make an effort, from (putten) in dever, (to put oneself) in duty, make it one's duty : in, in. See IN + dever, duty (from Old French deveir, devoir, duty.] --en-deav'or-er n. A venture that requires extensive planning and work : enterprise, project, undertaking, venture, endeavor, operation, effort. The use of one's energy to do something : effort, endeavor, labor, elbow grease, exertion, pains, striving, struggle, toil, travail, trouble, work. An earnest try : effort, endeavor, assay, attempt, essay, struggle, trial, undertaking, venture. To dare to broach or begin. v.dare, endeavor, attempt, chance, risk, stake, take on, try, undertake, hazard, brave, confront, venture, take a chance on, take chances on, essay, face, gamble on, wager, make bold. To make an attempt to do or make. v. strive, endeavor, labor, attempt, buckle down, bust a gut (slang) , essay, give it a shot (informal) , give it one's all, go all out, have a go at, knuckle down, tackle, take a crack at, try, undertake, venture, work, make an effort.

endowment en-dow-ment (en-doumnt) n. 1. The act of endowing. 2. Funds or property donated to an institution, an individual, or a group as a source of income. 3. A natural gift, ability, or quality. A gift to a charity or cause : contribution, alms, benefaction, beneficence, charity, donation, bestowal, offering, grant, endowment. A sum of money granted for a definite purpose : grant, allowance, appropriation, award, contribution, donation, endowment, financial aid, scholarship, stipend, subsidy, subvention, grant-in-aid. Special capability required to do something : aptitude, ability, genius, gift, knack, makings, stuff, talent, faculty, flair, facility, endowment, cleverness.

enshrouded en-shroud (en-shroud) v. tr. en-shroud-ed, en-shroud-ing, en-shrouds. To cover with or as if with a shroud: Clouds enshrouded the summit. To shelter from light. v. screen, cover, enshroud, mask, protect, shade, shield, shroud, veil. Antonyms: expose. To enclose or encase with or as if with a covering. v. enfold, envelop, wrap, enwrap, swaddle, swathe, enswathe, enshroud, shroud, invest, veil, encircle, cover, sheathe, surround, cloak, hug, smother. Antonyms: unwrap, expose, uncover, lay bare.

envisage en-vis-age (en-vizij) v. tr. en-vis-aged, en-vis-ag-ing, en-vis-ag-es. 1. To conceive an image or a picture of, especially as a future possibility: envisaged a world at peace. 2. To consider or regard in a certain way. [French envisager : Old French en-, in. + Old French visage, face.] To form mental images of. v. visualize, conceptualize, fantasize, conceive, conjure up, envisage, envision, image, imagine, dream up, picture, see, vision. To have in mind as a goal or purpose. v. intend, aim, contemplate, design, aspire, envisage, envision, expect, foresee, mean, plan, project, purpose, propose, resolve, scheme.

equipoising e-qui-poise (ekw-poiz, ekw-) n. 1. Equality in distribution, as of weight, relationship, or emotional forces; equilibrium. 2. A counterpoise; a counterbalance. A condition of stability created by the opposition of equal forces : equilibrium, balance, counterpoise, equipoise, stasis, equiponderance.

equivalate e-quiv-a-lent (i-kwiv-lnt) adj. 1. Equal, as in value, force, or meaning. Having similar or identical effects. 2. Being essentially equal, all things considered: a wish that was equivalent to a command. 3. Mathematics. Capable of being put into a one-to-one relationship. Used of two sets. Having virtually identical or corresponding parts. 4. Chemistry. Having the same ability to combine. n. 1. Something that is essentially equal to another: "Prejudicing vital foreign policy considerations in order to rescue individuals finds its domestic equivalent in the inflated awards paid to ... accident and malpractice victims" (Moorhead Kennedy) . 2. Chemistry. Equivalent weight. [Middle English, from Late Latin aequivalens, aequivalent-, present participle of aequivalere, to have equal force : aequi-, equi- + valere, to be strong.] --e-quiv'a-lent-ly adv. Something analogous to something else : parallel, analog, congener, correlative, correspondent, counterpart, equal, equivalent, homologue, match. Antonyms: opposite, reverse. e-quiv-a-lence (i-kwiv-lns) n. 1. The state or condition of being equivalent; equality. 2. Mathematics. An equivalence relation. The state of being equivalent : equivalence, equality, par, parity, evenness, equivalency, uniformity, sameness. Antonyms: inequality, dissimilarity, difference.

ether e-ther (ethr) n. 1. Any of a class of organic compounds in which two hydrocarbon groups are linked by an oxygen atom. 2. A volatile, highly flammable liquid, C2H5OC2H5, derived from the distillation of ethyl alcohol with sulfuric acid and widely used as a reagent, a solvent, and an anesthetic. Also called diethyl ether, ethyl ether. 3. The regions of space beyond the earth's atmosphere; the heavens. 4. The element believed in ancient and medieval civilizations to fill all space above the sphere of the moon and to compose the stars and planets. 5. Physics. An all-pervading, infinitely elastic, massless medium formerly postulated as the medium of propagation of electromagnetic waves. [Middle English, upper air, from Latin aether, from Greek aither.] --e-ther'ic (i-therik, i-thir-). adj. The arch or expanse of the sky : firmament, air, atmosphere, empyrean (literary) , ether, heavens, wild blue yonder, space, outer space, celestial expanse, starry heavens, vault.

eventuated beings who are not created; they simply are. e-ven-tu-ate (i-venchoo-at) v. intr. e-ven-tu-at-ed, e-ven-tu-at-ing, e-ven-tu-ates. To result ultimately: The epidemic eventuated in the deaths of thousands. To be shown to be in the end. v. prove, end up, turn out, wind up, result in, be found, eventuate. To end in a particular way. v. result, come out, conclude, culminate, eventuate, pan out, succeed, turn out, work out.

existential that which knows before experience is existential. ex-is-ten-tial (egzi-stenshl, eksi-) adj. 1. Of, relating to, or dealing with existence. 2. Based on experience; empirical. 3. Of or as conceived by existentialism or existentialists: an existential moment of choice. ex'is-ten'tial-ly adv. Based on fact, observation, or experience. adj. empirical, existential, factual, observable, experiential, real.

experiential that which grows by virtue of experience is experiential. ex-pe-ri-en-tial (ik-spire-enshl) adj. Relating to or derived from experience.--ex-pe'ri-en'tial-ly adv. Based on fact, observation, or experience. adj.empirical, existential, factual, observable, experiential, real.

extradivine extra- or extro- pref. Outside; beyond: extraterritorial. [Late Latin, from Latin extra.] + divine (di-vin) adj. di-vin-er, di-vin-est. 1. Having the nature of or being a deity. Of, relating to, emanating from, or being the expression of a deity: sought divine guidance through meditation. Being in the service or worship of a deity; sacred. 2. Superhuman; godlike. 3. Supremely good or beautiful; magnificent: a divine performance of the concerto. Extremely pleasant; delightful: had a divine time at the ball. 4. Heavenly; perfect.

extraspiritual extra- pref. Outside; beyond: extraterritorial. [Late Latin, from Latin extra.] + spiritual (spiri-choo-l) adj. 1. Of, relating to, consisting of, or having the nature of spirit; not tangible or material. See Synonyms at immaterial. 2. Of, concerned with, or affecting the soul. 3. Of, from, or relating to God; deific. 4. Of or belonging to a church or religion; sacred. 5. Relating to or having the nature of spirits or a spirit; supernatural.

facilitating fa-cil-i-tate (f-sili-tat) v. tr. fa-cil-i-tat-ed, fa-cil-i-tat-ing, fa-cil-i-tates. To make easy or easier: political agreements that facilitated troop withdrawals. [From French faciliter, from Old French, from Italian facilitare, from facile, facile, from Latin facilis.] --fa-cil'i-ta'tive (-tativ) . adj. --fa-cil'i-ta'tor n. To make less difficult. v. expedite, ease, unobstruct, facilitate, simplify. Antonyms: hinder, block, obstruct, complicate.

fetters fet-ter (fetr) n. 1. A chain or shackle for the ankles or feet. 2. Something that serves to restrict; a restraint.v. tr. fet-tered, fet-ter-ing, fet-ters. 1. To put fetters on; shackle. 2. To restrict the freedom of. See Synonyms at hamper1. [Middle English feter, from Old English.] To restrain the freedom of. v. fetter, hinder, hobble, block, curb, trammel, entrammel, hamper, tie, tie up, leash, hog-tie, shackle, tether, hamstring, harness, bar, chain, handcuff, manacle. Antonyms: free, liberate, release, unfettered.

finite, finity fi-nite (finit) adj. 1. Having bounds; limited: a finite list of choices; our finite fossil fuel reserves. Existing, persisting, or enduring for a limited time only; impermanent. 2. Mathematics. Being neither infinite nor infinitesimal. Having a positive or negative numerical value; not zero. Possible to reach or exceed by counting. Used of a number. Having a limited number of elements. Used of a set. 3. Grammar. Limited by person, number, tense, and mood. Used of a verb that can serve as a predicate or the initial element of one.n. A finite thing. [Middle English finit, from Latin finitus, past participle of finire, to limit, from finis, end.] --fi'nite'ly adv. --fi'nite'ness n. fin-i-tude (fini-tood, -tyood, fini-) n. The quality or condition of being finite.

focal fo-cal (fokl) adj. 1. Of or relating to a focus. 2. Placed at or measured from a focus.--fo'cal-ly adv. focalization n.

formulate for-mu-late (formy-lat) v. tr. for-mu-lat-ed, for-mu-lat-ing, for-mu-lates. 1. To state as or reduce to a formula. To express in systematic terms or concepts. To devise or invent: formulate strategy. 2. To prepare according to a specified formula.--for'mu-la'tion n. --for'mu-la'tor n. To convey in words. v.phrase, couch, describe, express, formulate, put, term, word. To make clear or clearer. v.explain, clarify, delineate, formulate, disambiguate, elucidate, explicate, illuminate, illustrate, interpret, spell out, define.Antonyms: obfuscate, confuse. To arrange in some system. v.categorize, mold, cast, describe, formulate, sort, type.Antonyms: disarrange, unsort.

hypothesis hy-poth-e-sis (hi-pothi-sis) n.pl. hy-poth-e-ses (-sez) . Abbr. hyp., hypoth. 1. A tentative explanation that accounts for a set of facts and can be tested by further investigation; a theory. 2. Something taken to be true for the purpose of argument or investigation; an assumption. 3. The antecedent of a conditional statement. [Latin, subject for a speech, from Greek hupothesis, proposal, supposition, from hupotithenai, to suppose : hupo-, hypo- + tithenai, to place.] Something taken to be true without proof : presupposition, assumption, postulate, postulation, premise, presumption, supposition, thesis, theory, hypothesis, speculation, conjecture. Something taken as true for the sake of argument or investigation : hypothesis, supposition, assumption, premise, theory, thesis. A judgment arrived at by guessing : conjecture, assumption, expectation, guess, postulation, presumption, supposition, speculation, suspicion, theory, hypothesis, inference, surmise.Antonyms: fact, surety, certainty.

ideational i-de-a (i-de) n. 1. Something, such as a thought or conception, that potentially or actually exists in the mind as a product of mental activity. 2. An opinion, a conviction, or a principle: has some strange political ideas. 3. A plan, scheme, or method. 4. The gist of a specific situation; significance: The idea is to finish the project on time and under budget. 5. A notion; a fancy. 6. Music. A theme or motif. 7. Philosophy. In the philosophy of Plato, an archetype of which a corresponding being in phenomenal reality is an imperfect replica. In the philosophy of Kant, a concept of reason that is transcendent but nonempirical. In the philosophy of Hegel, absolute truth; the complete and ultimate product of reason. 8. Obsolete. A mental image of something remembered. [Middle English, from Latin, from Greek.] Conception, notion, or mental image : idea, concept, impression, perception, picture, thought, insight, interpretation, mental picture, apperception.

impinges im-pinge (im-pinj) v. intr. im-pinged, im-ping-ing, im-ping-es. 1. To collide or strike: Sound waves impinge on the eardrum. 2. To encroach; trespass: Do not impinge on my privacy.v. tr. To encroach upon: "One of a democratic government's continuing challenges is finding a way to protect ... secrets without impinging the liberties that democracy exists to protect" (Christian Science Monitor) . [Latin impingere : in-, against. See IN-2 + pangere, to fasten. See pag-.] --im-pinge'ment n. --im-ping'er n.

incomprehensible in-com-pre-hen-si-ble (inkom-pri-hens-bl, in-kom-) adj. 1. Difficult or impossible to understand or comprehend; unintelligible: incomprehensible jargon. Impossible to know or fathom: incomprehensible mysteries. 2. Archaic. Having no limits; boundless.--in'com-pre-hen'si-bil'i-ty or in'com-pre-hen'si-ble-ness n. --in'com-pre-hen'si-bly adv. Tending to elude perception or comprehension. adj.imponderable, impalpable, imperceptible, incomprehensible, intangible.Antonyms: understandable, comprehensible.

indicative in-dic-a-tive (in-dik-tiv) adj. 1. Serving to indicate: symptoms indicative of anemia; an insignia indicative of high rank. 2. Abbr. indic. Grammar. Of, relating to, or being the mood of the verb used in ordinary objective statements.n. Abbr. indic. Grammar. 1. The indicative mood. 2. A verb in the indicative mood.--in-dic'a-tive-ly adv. Serving as a symbol. adj.symbolic, emblematic, emblematical, indicative, representational, representative, token. Of, providing, or constituting evidence. adj.evidentiary, demonstrative, designative, evidential, forensic, indicative, verificative.

indissoluble in-dis-sol-u-ble (indi-soly-bl) adj. 1. Permanent; binding: an indissoluble contract; an indissoluble union. 2. Impossible to dissolve, disintegrate, or decompose: an indissoluble compound.--in'dis-sol'u-bil'i-ty or in'dis-sol'u-ble-ness n. --in'dis-sol'u-bly adv.

inhere, inherent in-here (in-hir) v. intr. in-hered, in-her-ing, in-heres. To be inherent or innate. [Latin inhaerere : in-, in. See IN- + haerere, to stick.] --in-her'ence (-hirns, -her-) . or in-her'en-cy n. To have as an inherent basis. v.inhere, consist, dwell, exist, lie, repose, reside, rest. in-her-ent (in-hirnt, -her-) adj. Existing as an essential constituent or characteristic; intrinsic. [Latin inhaerens, inhaerent-, present participle of inhaerere, to inhere.] --in-her'ent-ly adv. Of or relating to a basis, foundation, or elementary element. adj.fundamental, basic, rudimental, underlying, foundational, primary, main, central, principle, constitutional, inherent, intrinsic, organic. Possessed at birth. adj.innate, congenital, inherent, genetic, inborn, inherited.Antonyms: learned. Of or relating to the essential nature of a thing. adj.inherent, intrinsic, basic, elemental, innate.Antonyms: extrinsic, extraneous, external.

intension in-ten-sion (in-tenshn) n. 1. The state or quality of being intense; intensity. 2. The act of becoming intense or more intense; intensification. 3. Logic. The sum of the attributes contained in a term. [Latin intensio, intension-, from intensus, stretched.] --in-ten'sion-al adj. in-tense (in-tens) adj. in-tens-er, in-tens-est. 1. Possessing or displaying a distinctive feature to an extreme degree: the intense sun of the tropics. 2. Extreme in degree, strength, or size: intense heat. 3. Involving or showing strain or extreme effort: intense concentration. 4. Deeply felt; profound: intense emotion. Tending to feel deeply: an intense writer. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin intensus, stretched, intent, from past participle of intendere, to stretch, intend.] --in-tense'ly adv. --in-tense'ness n. Showing intense feeling. adj. passionate, hammy, emotive, impassioned, intense, vehement, ardent, fervid, enthusiastic. Antonyms: apathetic, unfeeling, dispassionate, unemotional. Intensely painful. adj. excruciating, agonizing, acute, cutting, fierce, intense, knifelike, numbing, penetrating, piercing, raw, sharp, torturous.

interassociated inter-pref. 1. Between; among: international. 2. In the midst of; within: intertropical. 3. Mutual; mutually: interrelate. 4. Reciprocal; reciprocally: intermingle. [Middle English entre-, inter-, from Old French entre-, from Latin inter-, from inter, between, among.] as-so-ci-ate (-soshe-at, -se-) v. as-so-ci-at-ed, as-so-ci-at-ing, as-so-ci-ates.v. tr. 1. To join as a partner, ally, or friend. 2. To connect or join together; combine. 3. To connect in the mind or imagination: "I always somehow associate Chatterton with autumn" (John Keats) .v. intr. 1. To join in or form a league, union, or association. See Synonyms at join. 2. To keep company.n. (-it, -at) . Abbr. assoc. 1. A person united with another or others in an act, an enterprise, or a business; a partner or colleague. 2. A companion; a comrade. 3. One that habitually accompanies or is associated with another; an attendant circumstance. 4. A member of an institution or society who is granted only partial status or privileges. 5. Often Associate. A degree conferred by a two-year college after the prescribed course of study has been successfully completed: an Associate in Arts.adj. (-it, -at) . 1. Joined with another or others and having equal or nearly equal status: an associate editor. 2. Having partial status or privileges: an associate member of the club. 3. Following or accompanying; concomitant. [Middle English associaten, from Latin associare, associat- : ad-, ad- + socius, companion.]

irresistible ir-re-sis-ti-ble (iri-zist-bl) adj. 1. Impossible to resist: an irresistible impulse to sneeze. 2. Having an overpowering appeal: irresistible beauty. --ir're-sis'ti-bil'i-ty or ir're-sis'ti-ble-ness n. --ir're-sis'ti-bly adv.

kindred kin-dred (kindrid) n. 1. A group of related persons, as a clan or tribe. 2. n (used with a pl. verb. A person's relatives; kinfolk) .adj. 1. Of the same ancestry or family: kindred clans. 2. Having a similar or related origin, nature, or character: kindred emotions. [Middle English kinrede, kindrede, from Old English cynrede : cyn, kin. See gen-. + -rede, variant of raeden, condition.] --kin'dred-ness n. A group of people sharing common ancestry : clan, ancestors, breed, descendants, dynasty, family, house, kindred, line, lineage, people, race, stock, strain, tribe. Being similar or related in some or various ways. adj. alike, like, akin, close, analogous, homologous, allied, kindred, comparable, along the same lines as, cognate, correlative, correlated, corresponding, parallel, related.Antonyms: unalike, different, unrelated, dissimilar. Connected by kinship or common origin. adj. kindred, agnate, akin, cognate, connate, consanguine, consanguineous, kin, related. Antonyms: unrelated.

luminous lu-mi-nous (loom-ns) adj. 1. Emitting light, especially emitting self-generated light. 2. Full of light; illuminated. See Synonyms at bright. 3. Easily comprehended; clear: luminous prose. Enlightened and intelligent; inspiring: luminous ideas. [Middle English, from Old French lumineux, from Latin luminosus, from lumen, lumin-, light.] --lu'mi-nous-ly adv. --lu'mi-nous-ness n. Emitting light, especially that which is self-generated. adj. luminous, aglow, fluorescent, glowing, incandescent, luminescent, phosphorescent.

mandate, mandates man-date (mandat) n. 1. An authoritative command or instruction. 2. A command or an authorization given by a political electorate to its representative. 3. A commission from the League of Nations authorizing a member nation to administer a territory. A region under such administration. 4. Law. An order issued by a superior court or an official to a lower court. A contract by which one party agrees to perform services for another without payment. v. tr. man-dat-ed, man-dat-ing, man-dates. 1. To assign (a colony or territory) to a specified nation under a mandate. 2. To make mandatory, as by law; decree or require: mandated desegregation of public schools. [Latin mandatum, from neuter past participle of mandare, to order.] --man'da'tor n. An obligatory directive: command, behest, bidding, charge, dictate, injunction, mandate, order, ultimatum, edict, decree, decretal. Authoritative direction for conduct, or a system of such rules : law, code, commandment, regulation, mandate, edict, ordinance, act, bill, bylaw, canon, rule. To prescribe expressly and with authority. v. dictate, decree, charge, command, demand, call the shots, bid, direct, enjoin, impose, instruct, ordain, order, prescribe, proclaim, rule, lay down the law, mandate.

manifest man-i-fest (man-fest) adj. Clearly apparent to the sight or understanding; obvious, apparent. v. tr. man-i-fest-ed, man-i-fest-ing, man-i-fests. 1. To show or demonstrate plainly; reveal: "Mercedes ... manifested the chaotic abandonment of hysteria" (Jack London) . 2. To be evidence of; prove. 3. To record in a ship's manifest. To display or present a manifest of (cargo). n. 1. A list of cargo or passengers carried on a ship or plane. 2. An invoice of goods carried on a truck or train. 3. A list of railroad cars according to owner and location. [Middle English manifeste, from Old French, from Latin manufestus, manifestus, caught in the act, blatant, obvious.] --man'i-fest'ly adv. To show or demonstrate by example. v. illustrate, epitomize, embody, evince, exemplify, instance, manifest, personify, represent, typify. To give a concrete form to an abstract quality. v. embody, externalize, personalize, incarnate, materialize, objectify, personify, substantiate, manifest, actualize, exemplify. Antonyms: disembody. Attracting notice or attention. adj. conspicuous, arresting, bold, eminent, manifest, blatant, marked, notable, noticeable, observable, obvious, outstanding, prominent. Antonyms: unnoticeable, ordinary. Readily seen or sensed. adj. clear, distinct, conspicuous, visible, vivid, noticeable, observable, open, unconcealed, evident, perceptible, detectable, apparent, palpable, obvious, manifest, patent, plain, utter, sheer, downright, graphic, out-and-out, outright, barefaced, unambiguous, unequivocal, unmistakable, unqualified. Antonyms: indistinct, invisible, unclear, inconspicuous. Completely conspicuous. adj. obvious, absolute, barefaced, blatant, clear, downright, evident, indisputable, manifest, noticeable, open, outright, patent, plain. Antonyms: inconspicuous. Easy to notice. adj. apparent, conspicuous, discernible, evident, manifest, noticeable, observable, perceptible, unmistakable, visible. Antonyms: inconspicuous, imperceptible. manifestation n.

manifold man-i-fold (man-fold) adj. 1. Many and varied; of many kinds; multiple: our manifold failings. 2. Having many features or forms: manifold intelligence. 3. Being such for a variety of reasons: a manifold traitor. 4. Consisting of or operating several devices of one kind at the same time.n. 1. A whole composed of diverse elements. 2. One of several copies. 3. A pipe or chamber having multiple apertures for making connections. 4. Mathematics. A topologic space or surface.v. tr. man-i-fold-ed, man-i-fold-ing, man-i-folds. 1. To make several copies of, as with carbon paper. 2. To make manifold; multiply. [Middle English, from Old English manigfeald : manig, many. See MANY + -feald, -fald, -fold.] --man'i-fold'ly adv. --man'i-fold'ness n.

mechanizer mech-a-nize (mek-niz) v. tr. mech-a-nized, mech-a-niz-ing, mech-a-niz-es. 1. To equip with machinery: mechanize a factory. 2. To equip (a military unit) with motor vehicles, such as tanks and trucks. 3. To make automatic or unspontaneous; render routine or monotonous. 4. To produce by or as if by machines.--mech'a-ni-za'tion (-ni-zashn) . n. --mech'a-niz'er n.

metamorphic met-a-mor-phic (met-morfik) adj. 1. Also met-a-mor-phous (-fs) . Of, relating to, or characterized by metamorphosis. 2. Geology. Changed in structure or composition as a result of metamorphism. Used of rock. [METAMORPH (OSIS) + -IC.]

metamorphosis met-a-mor-pho-sis (met-morf-sis) n.pl. met-a-mor-pho-ses (-sez). 1. A transformation, as by magic or sorcery. 2. A marked change in appearance, character, condition, or function. 3. Biology. A change in the form and often habits of an animal during normal development after the embryonic stage. Metamorphosis includes, in insects, the transformation of a maggot into an adult fly and a caterpillar into a butterfly and, in amphibians, the changing of a tadpole into a frog. 4. Pathology. A usually degenerative change in the structure of a particular body tissue. [Latin metamorphosis, from Greek, from metamorphoun, to transform : meta-, meta- + morphe, form.] The process or result of marked change : transformation, metamorphosis, altering, adaptability, changeability, mutation, permutation, transfiguration, translation, transmogrification, transmutation, transubstantiation.

metaphysical, metaphysics met-a-phys-i-cal (met-fizi-kl) adj. 1. Of or relating to metaphysics. 2. Based on speculative or abstract reasoning. 3. Highly abstract or theoretical; abstruse. 4. Immaterial; incorporeal, immaterial. Supernatural. 5. Often Metaphysical. Of or relating to the poetry of a group of 17th-century English poets whose verse is characterized by an intellectually challenging style and extended metaphors comparing very dissimilar things. [Middle English metaphisicalle, from Medieval Latin metaphysicalis, from metaphysica, metaphysics.] --met'a-phys'i-cal-ly adv. Of or having the nature of philosophy. adj. philosophical, metaphysical, philosophic, esoteric, dense. met-a-phys-ics (met-fiziks) n. Abbr. met., metaph. 1. n (used with a sing. verb) . Philosophy. The branch of philosophy that examines the nature of reality, including the relationship between mind and matter, substance and attribute, fact and value. 2. n (used with a pl. verb. The theoretical or first principles of a particular discipline:) . the metaphysics of law. 3. n (used with a sing. verb. A priori speculation upon questions that are unanswerable to scientific observation, analysis, or experiment). 4. n (used with a sing. verb. Excessively subtle or recondite reasoning) . [Pl. of Middle English methaphisik, from Medieval Latin metaphysica, from Medieval Greek (ta) metaphusika Greek (Ta) meta (ta) phusika, (the things) after the physics, the title of Aristotle's treatise on first principles (so called because it followed his work on physics) : meta, after.]

mobilization mo-bi-lize (mob-liz) v. mo-bi-lized, mo-bi-liz-ing, mo-bi-liz-es. v.tr. 1. To make mobile or capable of movement. 2. To assemble, prepare, or put into operation for or as if for war: mobilize troops; mobilize the snowplows. To assemble, marshal, or coordinate for a purpose: mobilized the country's economic resources. v. intr. To become prepared for or as if for war.--mo'bi-li-za'tion (-li-zashn) . n. To set or keep going. v. propel, mobilize, actuate, drive, impel, move. Antonyms: immobilize.

negation ne-ga-tion (ni-gashn) n. 1. The act or process of negating. 2. A denial, contradiction, or negative statement. 3. The opposite or absence of something regarded as actual, positive, or affirmative.--ne-ga'tion-al adj. An often formal act of ending something : cancellation, abolition, abrogation, annulment, invalidation, negation, nullification, repeal, rescission, revocation, voiding, withdrawal.

negativism neg-a-tiv-ism (neg-ti-vizm) n. 1. A habitual attitude of skepticism or resistance to the suggestions, orders, or instructions of others. 2. Behavior characterized by persistent refusal, without apparent or logical reasons, to act on or carry out suggestions, orders, or instructions of others.--neg'a-tiv-ist n. --neg'a-tiv-is'tic adj.

nonpersonalizable non-pref. Not: noncombatant. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin non, not.] per-son-al-ize (purs-n-liz) v. tr. per-son-al-ized, per-son-al-iz-ing, per-son-al-iz-es. 1. To take (a general remark or characterization) in a personal manner. 2. To attribute human or personal qualities to; personify. 3. To have printed, engraved, or monogrammed with one's name or initials: personalized the stationery; personalized the bath towels.--per'son-al-i-za'tion (-s-n-li-zashn) . n. To make noticeable or different. v. individualize, particularize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, mark, qualify, set apart, set off, personalize, single out, type. To give a concrete form to an abstract quality. v. embody, externalize, personalize, incarnate, materialize, objectify, personify, substantiate, manifest, actualize, exemplify. Antonyms: disembody.

nuclear nu-cle-ar (nookle-r, nyoo-) adj. 1. Biology. Of, relating to, or forming a nucleus: a nuclear membrane. 2. Physics. Of or relating to atomic nuclei. 3. Using or derived from the energy of atomic nuclei; atomic. 4. Of, using, or possessing atomic or hydrogen bombs: nuclear war; nuclear nations. [From NUCLEUS.]

omni- pref. A combining form denoting all, every, everywhere; as in omnipotent, all-powerful; omnipresent. The prefix "omni" is from the Latin "omnis" meaning "all." (The prefix "pan" has a similar usage but is descended from a Greek form which means, "all, wholly, entirely, altogether.")

omnificent All that happens is the result of a personal, volitional act of God; God personally does everything that is done; doing everything; all-doing; all-creating. From the Urantia papers: "God is truly omnipotent, but he is not omnificent -- he does not personally do all that is done." [118:6.1]

omnipotent Infinite or unlimited in power; almighty. Having full or absolute power or authority; having unlimited force or influence; exceedingly strong or mighty. From the Urantia papers: "To recognize Deity omnipotence is to enjoy security in your experience of cosmic citizenship, to possess assurance of safety in the long journey to Paradise. But to accept the fallacy of omnificence is to embrace the colossal error of Pantheism." [118:6.8]
om-nip-o-tent (om-nip-tnt) adj. Having unlimited or universal power, authority, or force; all-powerful. n. 1. One having unlimited power or authority: the bureaucratic omnipotents. 2. Omnipotent. God. Used with the. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin omnipotens, omnipotent- : omni-, omni- + potens, present participle of posse, to be able.] --om-nip'o-tence or om-nip'o-ten-cy n. --om-nip'o-tent-ly adv. Usage: Infinite is sometimes grouped with absolute terms such as unique, absolute, and omnipotent, since in its strict mathematical sense it allows no degree modification or comparison; one quantity cannot be more infinite than another (though technically one infinite set can be larger than another). Unlike other absolute terms, however, infinite also does not permit modification by adverbs such as nearly and almost; mathematically, infinity is not approached by degrees.

omnipotence adj. Having unlimited or universal power, authority, or force; all-powerful. The state of being omnipotent; almighty power; hence, one who is omnipotent; the Deity. Unlimited power of a particular kind; as, love's omnipotence.

omnipresent: Present at the same time in all places; everywhere present in all things and in all spaces. "Omnipresence is that attribute of God whereby he is said to be everywhere present. Traditionally this has meant 1) that God is not localized in time or space, 2) that his creativity and power are at work in everything that is. Most theologians have insisted that the term is to be understood qualitatively and not quantitatively. That is, just as 'eternity' does not refer to an unlimited time, neither does "omnipresence" refer to an indefinitely extended space. One contemporary definition is, 'The ability of divine love to maintain itself everywhere unhindered by limitations of space.'" (From V.A. Harvey's "A Handbook of Theological Terms"). This definition helps us grasp the Urantia papers' connotations of transcendence which are attached to the use of this word.
Present everywhere simultaneously; being present everywhere at once; present in all places at the same time; ubiquitous; being present everywhere at once; as, the omnipresent Jehovah. [syn: ubiquitous].

omnipresence adj. Present everywhere simultaneously. Presence in every place at the same time; unbounded or universal presence; ubiquity. His omnipresence fills Land, sea, and air, and every kind that lives. Milton. The state of being everywhere at once (or seeming to be everywhere at once) [syn: ubiquity, ubiquitousness].

omniscient:
adj. Having total knowledge; knowing everything: an omniscient deity. Knowing all things; all-knowing; infinite in knowledge; universal in knowledge. In classical theology this has been taken to mean that the divine knows the past, present, and future in one simple, timeless act of cognition. om-nis-cient (om-nishnt) adj. Having total knowledge; knowing everything: an omniscient deity; the omniscient narrator.n. 1. One having total knowledge. 2. Omniscient. God. Used with the. [Medieval Latin omnisciens, omniscient- : Latin omni-, omni- + Latin sciens, present participle of scire, to know.] --om-nis'cience or om-nis'cien-cy n. --om-nis'cient-ly adv.

omniscience n. The quality or state of being omniscient; having infinite knowledge; an attribute peculiar to God. One having total knowledge. Omniscient God. Used with the.

omnipresent om-ni-pres-ent (omni-preznt) adj. Present everywhere simultaneously. [Medieval Latin omnipresens, omnipresent- : Latin omni-, omni- + Latin praesens, present participle of praeesse, to be present.] --om'ni-pres'ence n.

pantheistic pan-the-ism (panthe-izm) n. 1. A doctrine identifying the Deity with the universe and its phenomena. 2. Belief in and worship of all gods.--pan'the-ist n. --pan'the-is'tic or pan'the-is'ti-cal adj. --pan'the-is'ti-cal-ly adv.

paucity pau-ci-ty (posi-te) n. 1. Smallness of number; fewness. 2. Scarcity; dearth: a paucity of natural resources. [Middle English paucite, from Old French, from Latin paucitas, from paucus, few.] The state of being less than is desired : meagerness, exiguity, exiguousness, scantness, skimpiness, sparseness, deficiency, lack, dearth, scantiness, paucity. Antonyms: abundance, profusion, plethora, surplus. The state of lacking something in a usual or needed amount : dearth, absence, defect, lack, poverty, want, paucity, deficiency, shortage, scarcity, insufficient supply.Antonyms: abundance, plenty, adequate supply.

personalizable, personalizations per-son-al-ize (purs-n-liz) v. tr. per-son-al-ized, per-son-al-iz-ing, per-son-al-iz-es. 1. To take (a general remark or characterization) in a personal manner. 2. To attribute human or personal qualities to; personify. 3. To have printed, engraved, or monogrammed with one's name or initials: personalized the stationery; personalized the bath towels.--per'son-al-i-za'tion (-s-n-li-zashn) . n. To make noticeable or different. v.individualize, particularize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, mark, qualify, set apart, set off, personalize, single out, type. To give a concrete form to an abstract quality. v.embody, externalize, personalize, incarnate, materialize, objectify, personify, substantiate, manifest, actualize, exemplify.Antonyms: disembody.

peruse pe-ruse (p-rooz) v. tr. pe-rused, pe-rus-ing, pe-rus-es. To read or examine, typically with great care. [Middle English perusen, to use up : Latin per-, per- + Middle English usen, to use.] --pe-rus'a-ble adj. --pe-rus'al n. --pe-rus'er n. USAGE NOTES: Peruse has long meant "to read thoroughly" and is often used loosely when one could use the word read instead. The worst that can be said about the latter use is that it is excessively literary or precious. However, common misuse of the word in the sense "to glance over, skim," as in I only had a moment to peruse the manual quickly, was unacceptable to 66 percent of the Usage Panel. To examine or observe with great care. v. scrutinize, check out, eye, look over, peruse, pore over, probe, review, sift, size up, study, vet, inspect. Antonyms: disregard, overlook.

pervade per-vade (pr-vad) v. tr. per-vad-ed, per-vad-ing, per-vades. To be present throughout; permeate. [Latin pervadere : per-, through. See PER- + vadere, to go.] --per-vad'er n. --per-va'sion (-vazhn). n. To pass or cause to pass through every part of a thing. v. fill, flood, infuse, imbrue, imbue, permeate, pervade, saturate, suffuse, penetrate, impregnate, percolate, transfuse, infiltrate, charge, sodden, soak through. To cause to be filled with a particular mood or tone. v. charge, permeate, freight, impregnate, pervade, saturate, suffuse, transfuse, penetrate, percolate.

phenomena phe-nom-e-non (fi-nom-non, -nn) n.pl. phe-nom-e-na (-n) . 1. An occurrence, a circumstance, or a fact that is perceptible by the senses. 2. pl. phe-nom-e-nons. An unusual, significant, or unaccountable fact or occurrence; a marvel. A remarkable or outstanding person; a paragon. See Synonyms at wonder. 3. Philosophy. That which appears real to the mind, regardless of whether its underlying existence is proved or its nature understood. In Kantian philosophy, the appearance of an object to the mind as opposed to its existence in and of itself, independent of the mind. 4. Physics. An observable event. [Late Latin phaenomenon, from Greek phainomenon, from neuter present participle of phainesthai, to appear.] USAGE NOTES: Phenomenon is the only singular form of this noun; phenomena is the usual plural. Phenomenons may also be used as the plural in nonscientific writing when the meaning is "extraordinary things, occurrences, or persons": They were phenomenons in the history of music. Someone or something that evokes surprise and admiration : sensation, knockout, marvel, miracle, phenomenon, prodigy, rarity, sight, spectacle, wonder. An event inexplicable by the laws of nature : miracle, marvel, phenomenon, prodigy, sensation, mystery, divine act, supernatural happening, wonder.

philosophic phi-los-o-phy (fi-los-fe) n.pl. phi-los-o-phies. Abbr. phil., philos. 1. Love and pursuit of wisdom by intellectual means and moral self-discipline. The investigation of causes and laws underlying reality. A system of philosophical inquiry or demonstration. 2. Inquiry into the nature of things based on logical reasoning rather than empirical methods. 3. The critique and analysis of fundamental beliefs as they come to be conceptualized and formulated. 4. The synthesis of all learning. 5. All learning except technical precepts and practical arts. 6. All the disciplines presented in university curriculums of science and the liberal arts, except medicine, law, and theology. 7. The science comprising logic, ethics, aesthetics, metaphysics, and epistemology. 8. A system of motivating concepts or principles: the philosophy of a culture. 9. A basic theory; a viewpoint: an original philosophy of advertising. 10. The system of values by which one lives: has an unusual philosophy of life. [Middle English philosophie, from Old French, from Latin philosophia, from Greek, from philosophos, lover of wisdom, philosopher.] A system of belief, principles, or opinions : creed, dogma, faith, religion, philosophy, doctrine, credo, canons, gospel. phil-o-soph-i-cal (fil-sofi-kl) also phil-o-soph-ic (-ik) adj. Abbr. phil., philos. 1. Of, relating to, or based on a system of philosophy. 2. Characteristic of a philosopher, as in equanimity, enlightenment, and wisdom.--phil'o-soph'i-cal-ly adv. Of or having the nature of philosophy. adj. philosophical, metaphysical, philosophic, esoteric, dense.

postulate pos-tu-late (posch-lat) v. tr. pos-tu-lat-ed, pos-tu-lat-ing, pos-tu-lates. 1. To make claim for; demand. 2. To assume or assert the truth, reality, or necessity of, especially as a basis of an argument. 3. To assume as a premise or axiom; take for granted. See Synonyms at presume.n. (poschoo-lit, -lat) . 1. Something assumed without proof as being self-evident or generally accepted, especially when used as a basis for an argument: "the postulate that there is little moral difference between the superpowers" (Henry A. Kissinger) . 2. A fundamental element; a basic principle. 3. Mathematics. An axiom. 4. A requirement; a prerequisite. [Medieval Latin postulare, postulat-, to nominate to a bishopric, to assume, from Latin, to request.] --pos'tu-la'tion n. pos-tu-late (posch-lat) .Something taken to be true without proof : presupposition, assumption, postulate, postulation, premise, presumption, supposition, thesis, theory, hypothesis, speculation, conjecture. To take for granted without proof. v.suppose, assume, posit, postulate, premise, presume, presuppose, reckon.

potential po-ten-tial (p-tenshl) adj. Abbr. pot. 1. Capable of being but not yet in existence; latent: a potential problem. 2. Having possibility, capability, or power. 3. Grammar. Of, relating to, or being a verbal construction with auxiliaries such as may or can; for example, it may snow.n. Abbr. pot. 1. The inherent ability or capacity for growth, development, or coming into being. 2. Something possessing the capacity for growth or development. 3. Grammar. A potential verb form. 4. Physics. The work required to bring a unit electric charge, magnetic pole, or mass from an infinitely distant position to a designated point in a static electric, magnetic, or gravitational field, respectively. 5. Symbol V Electricity. The potential energy of a unit charge at any point in an electric circuit measured with respect to a specified reference point in the circuit or to ground; voltage. [Middle English potencial, from Old French potenciel, from Late Latin potentialis, powerful, from Latin potentia, power, from potens, potent-, present participle of posse, to be able.] --po-ten'tial-ly adv. The power to perform a task : capability, capacity, ability, competence, facility, faculty, knack, means, might, mind, potential, skill, wherewithal. Antonyms: inadequacy, incompetence, ineptitude, inability. The attributes that qualify a person for a role : potential, quality, stuff, talent, makings, material, potentiality, ability, capability. Latent but capable of being activated. adj. dormant, inactive, potential, quiescent, resting.

predicated pred-i-cate (predi-kat) v. pred-i-cat-ed, pred-i-cat-ing, pred-i-cates.v. tr. 1. To base or establish (a statement or an action, for example) : He predicates his argument on the facts. 2. To state or affirm as an attribute or a quality of something: The sermon predicated the perfectibility of humankind. 3. To carry the connotation of; imply. 4. Logic. To make (a term or an expression) the predicate of a proposition. 5. To proclaim or assert; declare. v. intr. To make a statement or an assertion. n. (-kit) . Abbr. pred. 1. Grammar. One of the two main constituents of a sentence, modifying the subject and including the verb, objects, or phrases governed by the verb, as opened the door in Jane opened the door or is very sleepy in The child is very sleepy. 2. Logic. That part of a proposition that is affirmed or denied about the subject. For example, in the proposition We are mortal, mortal is the predicate.adj. (-kit) . 1. Grammar. Of or belonging to the predicate of a sentence or clause. 2. Stated or asserted; predicated. [Late Latin praedicare, praedicat-, from Latin, to proclaim : prae-, pre- + dicare, to proclaim.] --pred'i-ca'tion n. --pred'i-ca'tion-al adj. --pred'i-ca'tive adj. --pred'i-ca'tive-ly adv. To take or serve as a basis for. v. establish, anchor, base, lay the foundation, lay the groundwork, ground, found, predicate, root in, rest, seat.

prepersonal pre-pref. 1. Earlier; before; prior to: prehistoric. Preparatory; preliminary: premedical. In advance: prepay. 2. Anterior; in front of: preaxial. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin prae-, from prae, before, in front.] + personal (purs-nl) adj. 1. Of or relating to a particular person; private: "Like their personal lives, women's history is fragmented, interrupted" (Elizabeth Janeway) . 2. Done, made, or performed in person: a personal appearance. Done to or for or directed toward a particular person: a personal favor. 3. Concerning a particular person and his or her private business, interests, or activities; intimate: I have something personal to tell you. 4. Aimed pointedly at the most intimate aspects of a person, especially in a critical or hostile manner: an uncalled-for, highly personal remark. Tending to make remarks, or be unduly questioning, about another's affairs: She always becomes personal in an argument. 5. Of or relating to the body or physical being: personal cleanliness. 6. Relating to or having the nature of a person or self-conscious being: belief in a personal God. 7. Law. Relating to a person's movable property: personal possessions. 8. Grammar. Indicating grammatical person. n. 1. A personal item or notice in a newspaper. 2. personals. A column in a newspaper or magazine featuring personal notices. Of, relating to, or characteristic of oneself as an individual. adj. personal, idiosyncratic, individual, individualistic, inner, interior, internal, intimate, intime (French) , inward, own, particular, peculiar, private, intrinsic. Based on individual judgment. adj. discretional, arbitrary, personal, subjective. Antonyms: objective.

prerogatives pre-rog-a-tive (pri-rog-tiv) n. 1. An exclusive right or privilege held by a person or group, especially a hereditary or official right. 2. The exclusive right and power to command, decide, rule, or judge: the principal's prerogative to suspend a student. 3. A natural gift or advantage that confers superiority. 4. Characteristic superiority; preeminence. adj. Of, arising from, or exercising a prerogative. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin praerogativa, feminine of praerogativus, asked first, from praerogatus, past participle of praerogare, to ask before : prae-, pre- + rogare, to ask.] --pre-rog'a-tived adj. The right or condition of preceding : precedence, priority, predominance, preference, prerogative, primacy, privilege, right-of-way, seniority. A legitimate or supposed right to something : prerogative, license, claim, due, pretension, privilege, title, right, birthright, warrant. A privilege granted a person by virtue of birth : birthright, appanage, droit, perquisite, prerogative, right.

primacy pri-ma-cy (prim-se) n.pl. pri-ma-cies. 1. The state of being first or foremost. 2. Ecclesiastical. The office, rank, or province of primate. [Middle English primacie, from Old French, from Medieval Latin primatia, office of church primate, from Latin primas, primat- of first rank.] The right or condition of preceding : precedence, priority, predominance, preference, prerogative, primacy, privilege, right-of-way, seniority.

primal pri-mal (priml) adj. 1. Being first in time; original; primeval. 2. Of first importance; primary. [Medieval Latin primalis, from Latin primus, first.] --pri-mal'i-ty (-mali-te) . n.

primeval pri-me-val (pri-mevl) adj. Belonging to the first or earliest age or ages; original or ancient: a primeval forest. [From Latin primaevus, early in life : primus, first. See per1. + aevum, age. See aiw-.] --pri-me'val-ly adv.

projected proj-ect (projekt, -ikt) v. -- pro-ject pro-ject-ed, pro-ject-ing, pro-jects (pr-jekt) .v. tr. 1. To thrust outward or forward: project one's jaw in defiance. 2. To throw forward; hurl: project an arrow. 3. To send out into space; cast: project a light beam. 4. To cause (an image) to appear on a surface: projected the slide onto a screen. 5. Mathematics. To produce (a projection) . 6. To direct (one's voice) so as to be heard clearly at a distance. 7. Psychology. To externalize and attribute (an emotion, for example) to someone or something else. 8. To convey an impression of to an audience or to others: a posture that projects defeat; projected a positive corporate image. 9. To form a plan or an intention for: project a new business enterprise. 10. To calculate, estimate, or predict (something in the future) , based on present data or trends: projecting next year's expenses and income.v. intr. 1. To extend forward or out; jut out: beams that project beyond the eaves, bulge. 2. To direct one's voice so as to be heard clearly at a distance. [Middle English projecte, from Latin proiectum, projecting structure, from neuter past participle of proicere, to throw out : pro-, forth. See PRO- + iacere, to throw.] --pro-ject'a-ble adj. To have in mind as a goal or purpose. v. intend, aim, contemplate, design, aspire, envisage, envision, expect, foresee, mean, plan, project, purpose, propose, resolve, scheme.

qualification qual-i-fi-ca-tion (kwol-fi-kashn) n. 1. The act of qualifying or the condition of being qualified. 2. A quality, an ability, or an accomplishment that makes a person suitable for a particular position or task. 3. A condition or circumstance that must be met or complied with: fulfilled the qualifications for registering to vote in the presidential election. 4. A restriction or modification: an offer with a number of qualifications. An element that restricts or confines : restriction, caveat, condition, contingency, limitation, provision, proviso, qualification, requirement, stipulation, term, specification. The quality or state of being eligible : eligibility, fitness, proficiency, qualification, suitability, feasibility, suitableness, certification.

quartan quar-tan (kwortn) adj. Occurring every fourth day, counting inclusively, or every 72 hours. Used of a fever. n. A malarial fever recurring every 72 hours. [Middle English quartaine, from Old French, from Latin quartana, from quartanus, of the fourth, from quartus, fourth.]

reciprocal re-cip-ro-cal (ri-sipr-kl) adj. 1. Concerning each of two or more persons or things. 2. Interchanged, given, or owed to each other: reciprocal agreements to abolish customs duties; a reciprocal invitation to lunch. 3. Performed, experienced, or felt by both sides: reciprocal respect. 4. Interchangeable; complementary: reciprocal electric outlets. 5. Grammar. Expressing mutual action or relationship. Used of some verbs and compound pronouns. 6. Mathematics. Of or relating to the reciprocal of a quantity. 7. Physiology. Of or relating to a neuromuscular phenomenon in which the excitation of one group of muscles is accompanied by the inhibition of another. 8. Genetics. Of or designating a pair of crosses in which the male parent in one cross is of the same genotype or phenotype as the female parent in the other cross. n. 1. Something that is reciprocal to something else. 2. Mathematics. A number related to another in such a way that when multiplied together their product is 1. For example, the reciprocal of 7 is 1/7; the reciprocal of 2/3 is 3/2. [From Latin reciprocus, alternating.] --re-cip'ro-cal'i-ty (-kali-te) . or re-cip'ro-cal-ness (-kl-nis) . n. --re-cip'ro-cal-ly adv. Shared equally by two or more. adj. common, coordinate, mutual, collaborative, collective, conjoint, correlative, joint, reciprocal. Antonyms: individual.

sequential se-quen-tial (si-kwenshl) adj. 1. Forming or characterized by a sequence, as of units or musical notes. 2. Sequent. --se-quen'ti-al'i-ty (-she-ali-te) . n. --se-quen'tial-ly adv. se-quence (sekwns, -kwens) n. 1. A following of one thing after another; succession. 2. An order of succession; an arrangement. 3. A related or continuous series. See Synonyms at series. 4. Games. Three or more playing cards in consecutive order; a run. 5. A series of single film shots so edited as to constitute an aesthetic or dramatic unit; an episode. 6. Music. A melodic or harmonic pattern successively repeated at different pitches with or without a key change. 7. Roman Catholic Church. A hymn sung between the gradual and the Gospel. 8. Mathematics. An ordered set of quantities, as x, 2x2, 3x3, 4x4. 9. Biochemistry. The order of constituents in a polymer, especially the order of nucleotides in a nucleic acid or of the animal acids in a protein. v. tr. se-quenced, se-quenc-ing, se-quenc-es. 1. To organize or arrange in a sequence. 2. To determine the order of constituents in (a polymer, such as a nucleic acid or protein molecule) . [Middle English, a type of hymn, from Old French, from Medieval Latin sequentia, hymn, that which follows, from Late Latin, from Latin sequens, sequent-, present participle of sequi, to follow.] A number of things in or as if in line : series, chain, catena, course, order, sequence, string, succession, suite, train, progression, parade, set. A manner of consecutive arrangement in time or space : sequence, consecution, order, procession, succession, series, course. An action or state brought about by a cause : result, aftereffect, aftermath, consequence, fallout, effect, event, eventuality, issue, outcome, precipitate, sequel, sequence, upshot. The act of arranging or the way something is arranged : organization, categorization, systemization, arrangement, cataloguing, classification, disposal, distribution, formation, grouping, layout, ordering, placement, sequence, structure. Antonyms: disorganization, disarrangement.

simultaneous, simultaneously si-mul-ta-ne-ous (siml-tane-s, siml-) adj. 1. Happening, existing, or done at the same time, contemporary. 2. Mathematics. Containing variables for which there are values that can satisfy all the equations: simultaneous equations. [Latin simul, at the same time. + English -taneous as in INSTANTANEOUS.] --si'mul-ta'ne-ous-ly adv. --si'mul-ta'ne-ous-ness or si'mul-ta-ne'i-ty (-t-nei-te, -na-) . n. Belonging to or occurring at the same time. adj. contemporary, synchronized, coexistent, coetaneous, coeval, coincident, concomitant, concurrent, contemporaneous, simultaneous, synchronic, synchronous.

sophistries soph-is-try (sofi-stre) n.pl. soph-is-tries. 1. Plausible but fallacious argumentation. 2. A plausible but misleading or fallacious argument. Plausible but invalid reasoning : sophistry, casuistry, fallacy, speciousness, spuriousness.

space-fettered space (spas) n. 1. Mathematics. A set of elements or points satisfying specified geometric postulates: non-Euclidean space. The infinite extension of the three-dimensional field in which all matter exists. 2. The expanse in which the solar system, stars, and galaxies exist; the universe. The region of this expanse beyond Earth's atmosphere. 3. A blank or empty area: the spaces between words. 4. An area provided for a particular purpose: a parking space. 5. Reserved or available accommodation on a public transportation vehicle. 6. A period or interval of time. A little while: Let's rest for a space. 7. Sufficient freedom from external pressure to develop or explore one's needs, interests, and individuality: "The need for personal space inevitably asserts itself" (Maggie Scarf) . 8. Music. One of the intervals between the lines of a staff. 9. Printing. One of the blank pieces of type or other means used for separating words or characters. 10. One of the intervals during the telegraphic transmission of a message when the key is open or not in contact. 11. Blank sections in printed material or broadcast time available for use by advertisers. v. spaced, spac-ing, spac-es.v. tr. 1. To organize or arrange with spaces between. 2. To separate or keep apart. 3. Slang. To stupefy or disorient from or as if from a drug. Often used with out: The antihistamine spaces me out so I can't think clearly. v. intr. Slang. To be or become stupefied or disoriented. Often used with out: I was supposed to meet her, but I spaced out and forgot. [Middle English, area, from Old French espace, from Latin spatium.] --spac'er n. The arch or expanse of the sky : firmament, air, atmosphere, empyrean (literary) , ether, heavens, wild blue yonder, space, outer space, celestial expanse, starry heavens, vault. + fetter fet-ter (fetr) n. 1. A chain or shackle for the ankles or feet. 2. Something that serves to restrict; a restraint.v. tr. fet-tered, fet-ter-ing, fet-ters. 1. To put fetters on; shackle. 2. To restrict the freedom of, hamper. [Middle English feter, from Old English.] To restrain the freedom of. v. fetter, hinder, hobble, block, curb, trammel, entrammel, hamper, tie, tie up, leash, hog-tie, shackle, tether, hamstring, harness, bar, chain, handcuff, manacle. Antonyms: free, liberate, release.

spheres sphere (sfir) n. 1. Mathematics. A three-dimensional surface, all points of which are equidistant from a fixed point. 2. A spherical object or figure. 3. A celestial body, such as a planet or star. 4. The sky, appearing as a hemisphere to an observer: the sphere of the heavens. 5. Any of a series of concentric, transparent, revolving globes that together were once thought to contain the moon, sun, planets, and stars. 6. The extent of a person's knowledge, interests, or social position. 7. An area of power, control, or influence; domain. See Synonyms at field. v. tr. sphered, spher-ing, spheres. 1. To form into a sphere. 2. To put in or within a sphere. 3. To surround or encompass. [Middle English spere, from Old French espere, from Latin sphaera, from Greek sphaira.] --sphe-ric'i-ty (sfir-isi-te). n. A particular area of activity, study, or interest : specialty, field, area, arena, bag (slang) , bailiwick, department, domain, dominion, orbit, precinct, province, realm, region, sphere, terrain, territory, world. The surrounding conditions and circumstances : environment, ambiance, aura, atmosphere, backdrop, background, climate, frame of reference, medium, milieu, setting, sphere, surroundings, world, context. The action for which one is responsible : function, bailiwick, charge, job, province, sphere, task, trust, duty, business, role, concern. The planet where humans live: earth, Terra, blue planet, globe, planet, sphere, world.

spontaneous spon-ta-ne-ous (spon-tane-s) adj. 1. Happening or arising without apparent external cause; self-generated. 2. Arising from a natural inclination or impulse and not from external incitement or constraint. 3. Unconstrained and unstudied in manner or behavior. 4. Growing without cultivation or human labor; indigenous. [From Late Latin spontaneus, of one's own accord, from Latin sponte.] --spon-ta'ne-ous-ly adv. --spon-ta'ne-ous-ness n. SYNONYM: spontaneous, impulsive, instinctive, involuntary, automatic These adjectives mean acting, reacting, or happening without apparent forethought, prompting, or planning. Spontaneous applies to what arises naturally rather than resulting from external constraint or stimulus: The two suddenly embraced in a spontaneous gesture of affection. "The highest and best form of efficiency is the spontaneous cooperation of a free people" (Woodrow Wilson) . Impulsive refers to the operation of a sudden urge or feeling not governed by reason: Letting her friend borrow her car was an impulsive act that she immediately regretted. Instinctive implies behavior prompted by instinct as a natural consequence of membership in a species: "Nor is head-hunting, body-snatching, or killing for food instinctive or natural" (Bronislaw Malinowski) . The term also applies to what reflects or comes about as a result of a natural inclination or innate impulse: Offering to help the accident victims seems as instinctive as breathing. Involuntary refers to what is not subject to the control of the will: "It [becoming a hero] was involuntary. They sank my boat" (John F. Kennedy). Automatic suggests the unthinking, unfeeling functioning of a machine; it implies an unvarying mechanical response or reaction: She accepted the subpoena with an automatic "thank you." Occurring without apparent delay. adj. instantaneous, immediate, instant, lightning-quick, split-second, spontaneous. Antonyms: delayed. Occurring or arising without apparent external cause. adj. spontaneous, automatic, unplanned, impulsive, instinctive. Antonyms: expected, planned. Spoken or performed with little or no preparation. adj. extemporaneous, ad-lib, extempore, impromptu, off the cuff, offhand, spontaneous, unprepared, unrehearsed. Antonyms: rehearsed, prepared.

static stat-ic (statik) adj. 1. Having no motion; being at rest; quiescent. Fixed; stationary. 2. Physics. Of or relating to bodies at rest or forces that balance each other. 3. Electricity. Of, relating to, or producing stationary charges; electrostatic. 4. Of, relating to, or produced by random radio noise. n. 1. Random noise, such as crackling in a receiver or specks on a television screen, produced by atmospheric disturbance of the signal. 2. Informal. Back talk. Interference; obstruction. Angry or heated criticism. [New Latin staticus, relating to weight, from Greek statikos, causing to stand, from statos, standing.] --stat'i-cal adj. --stat'i-cal-ly adv. Not subject to change or variation. adj. constant, invariable, continuous, fixed, reliable, stable, static, steady, unchangeable, unchanging, unvarying. Antonyms: inconstant, changeable, varying, unfixed. Not moving or flowing. adj.stagnant, stagnating, stale, inert, sluggish, static, dead. Antonyms: flowing. statics stat-ics (statiks) n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb: The equilibrium mechanics of stationary bodies).

dynamics dy-nam-ics (di-namiks) n. 1. a. n (used with a sing. verb. The branch of mechanics that is concerned with the effects of forces on the motion of a body or system of bodies, especially of forces that do not originate within the system itself: kinetics. b. n (used with a pl. verb. The forces and motions that characterize a system. The dynamics of ocean waves are complex. 2. n (used with a pl. verb. The social, intellectual, or moral forces that produce activity and change in a given sphere). The dynamics of international trade have influenced our business decisions on this matter. 3. n (used with a pl. verb. Variation in force or intensity, especially in musical sound)"The conductor tended to overpower her with aggressive dynamics" (Thor Eckert, Jr) . 4. n (used with a sing. verb. Psychodynamics).

subdeified sub- pref. 1. Below; under; beneath: subsoil. 2. Subordinate; secondary: subplot. Subdivision: subregion. 3. Less than completely or normally; nearly; almost: subhuman. [Middle English, from Latin, from sub, under.] de-i-fy (de-fi) v. tr. dei-fied, dei-fy-ing, dei-fies. 1. To make a god of; raise to the condition of a god. 2. To worship or revere as a god: deify a leader. 3. To idealize; exalt: deifying success. [Middle English deifien, from Old French deifier, from Late Latin deificare, from deificus, deific.] --de'i-fi'er n.

subordinate sub- pref. 1. Below; under; beneath: subsoil. 2. Subordinate; secondary: subplot. Subdivision: subregion. 3. Less than completely or normally; nearly; almost: subhuman. [Middle English, from Latin, from sub, under.] sub-or-di-nate (s-bordn-it) adj. 1. Belonging to a lower or inferior class or rank; secondary. 2. Subject to the authority or control of another.n. One that is subordinate.v. tr. sub-or-di-nat-ed, sub-or-di-nat-ing, sub-or-di-nates (s-bordn-at) . 1. To put in a lower or inferior rank or class. 2. To make subservient; subdue. [Middle English subordinat, from Medieval Latin subordinatus, past participle of subordinare, to put in a lower rank: Latin sub-, sub- + Latin ordinare, to set in order (from ordo, ordin-, order.)] --sub-or'di-nate-ly adv. --sub-or'di-nate-ness or sub-or'di-na'tion (-nashn). n. --sub-or'di-na'tive (-ntiv) . adj. A person who assists or supports another in a job or function : aide, assistant, junior, secondary, staff member, subordinate, henchman. One belonging to a lower class or rank : subordinate, flunky, dogsbody, inferior, junior, lackey, menial, secondary, subaltern, underling. Antonyms: superior, senior, leader.

super- pref. 1. Above; over; upon: superimpose. 2. Superior in size, quality, number, or degree: superfine. 3. Exceeding a norm: supersaturate. Excessive in degree or intensity: supersubtle. Containing a specified ingredient in an unusually high proportion: superphosphate. 4. More inclusive than a specified category: superorder. [Latin, from super, over, above. See uper.]

superadditive super- pref. 1. Above; over; upon: superimpose. 2. Superior in size, quality, number, or degree: superfine. 3. Exceeding a norm: supersaturate. Excessive in degree or intensity: supersubtle. Containing a specified ingredient in an unusually high proportion: superphosphate. 4. More inclusive than a specified category: superorder. [Latin, from super, over, above.] + additive ad-di-tive (adi-tiv) n. A substance added in small amounts to something else to improve, strengthen, or otherwise alter it.adj. 1. Marked by, produced by, or involving addition. 2. Color. Of or being any of certain primary colors of wavelengths that may be mixed with one another to produce other colors.

superimposed su-per-im-pose (soopr-im-poz) v. tr. su-per-im-posed, su-per-im-pos-ing, su-per-im-pos-es. 1. To lay or place (something) on or over something else. 2. To add as a distinct feature, element, or quality: superimposed her own interpretation when she retold the story.--su'per-im-pos'a-ble adj. --su'per-im'po-si'tion (-imp-zishn) . n.

supertime Outside of time. = super- pref. 1. Above; over; upon: superimpose. 2. Superior in size, quality, number, or degree: superfine. 3. Exceeding a norm: supersaturate. Excessive in degree or intensity: supersubtle. Containing a specified ingredient in an unusually high proportion: superphosphate. 4. More inclusive than a specified category: superorder. [Latin, from super, over, above.] + -time (tim) n. 1. Abbr. t., T. A nonspatial continuum in which events occur in apparently irreversible succession from the past through the present to the future. An interval separating two points on this continuum; a duration: a long time since the last war; passed the time reading. A number, as of years, days, or minutes, representing such an interval: ran the course in a time just under four minutes. A similar number representing a specific point on this continuum, reckoned in hours and minutes: checked her watch and recorded the time, 6:17 A.M. A system by which such intervals are measured or such numbers are reckoned: solar time. [Middle English, from Old English tima.]

symbolization sym-bol-ize (simb-liz) v. sym-bol-ized, sym-bol-iz-ing, sym-bol-iz-es.v. tr. 1. To serve as a symbol of: "Munich, the 1938 Hitler-Chamberlain meeting that now symbolizes the idea of appeasement" (Jonathan Alter) . 2. To represent or identify by a symbol. v. intr. To use symbols.--sym'bol-i-za'tion (-b-li-zashn) . n. --sym'bol-iz'er n. To act as a symbol of. v. signify, denote, mean, symbolize.

synthesized syn-the-size (sinthi-siz) v. syn-the-sized, syn-the-siz-ing, syn-the-siz-es.v. tr. 1. To combine so as to form a new, complex product: "His works synthesize photography, painting and linguistic devices" (Paul Taylor) . 2. To form or produce by chemical synthesis.v. intr. To form a synthesis. To combine and adapt in order to attain a particular effect. v.blend, harmonize, synthesize, arrange, incorporate, integrate, unify, coordinate, orchestrate.Antonyms: clash.

tantamount tan-ta-mount (tant-mount) adj. Equivalent in effect or value: a request tantamount to a demand. [From obsolete tantamount, an equivalent, from Anglo-Norman tant amunter, to amount to as much : tant, so much, so great (from Latin tantum, neuter of tantus, from tam, so. See to-.) + amunter, to amount to, variant of Old French amonter.]

terminology ter-mi-nol-o-gy (turm-nol-je) n.pl. ter-mi-nol-o-gies. 1. The vocabulary of technical terms used in a particular field, subject, science, or art; nomenclature. 2. The study of nomenclature. [German Terminologie, from Medieval Latin terminus, expression.] --ter'mi-no-log'i-cal (-n-loji-kl). adj. --ter'mi-no-log'i-cal-ly adv. --ter'mi-nol'o-gist n.

theoretical the-o-ret-i-cal (the-reti-kl) also the-o-ret-ic (-retik) adj. 1. Of, relating to, or based on theory. 2. Restricted to theory; not practical: theoretical physics. 3. Given to theorizing; speculative. [Late Latin theoreticus, from Greek theoretikos, from theoretos, observable, from theorein, to look at. See THEOREM.] --the'o-ret'i-cal-ly adv.SYNONYM: theoretical, abstract, academic, hypothetical, speculative The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "concerned primarily with theories or hypotheses rather than practical considerations": theoretical linguistics; abstract reasoning; a purely academic discussion; a hypothetical statement; speculative knowledge. Based on or restricted to theory; not practical or proven. adj.hypothetical, abstract, academic, speculative, supposed, suppositional, suppositious, theoretical, unapplied.Antonyms: proved, proven, definite.

transaction trans-ac-tion (tran-sakshn, -zak-) n. 1. The act of transacting or the fact of being transacted. 2. Something transacted, especially a business agreement or exchange. 3. Communication involving two or more people that affects all those involved; personal interaction: "a rich sense of the transaction between writer and reader" (William Zinsser). 4. transactions. A record of business conducted at a meeting; proceedings. --trans-ac'tion-al adj. The action of doing or carrying out : performance, execution, implementation, performing, transaction, fulfillment, exercise, operation, exploit, accomplishment, discharge, effectuation, perpetration. Antonyms: nonfulfillment. An often legally binding arrangement : agreement, accord, arrangement, bargain, bond, compact, contract, convention, covenant, pact, transaction, settlement.

transcended, transcendence, transcendent tran-scend (tran-send) v. tran-scend-ed, tran-scend-ing, tran-scends.v. tr. 1. To pass beyond the limits of: emotions that transcend understanding. 2. To be greater than, as in intensity or power; surpass: love that transcends infatuation. See Synonyms at excel. 3. To exist above and independent of (material experience or the universe) : "One never can see the thing in itself, because the mind does not transcend phenomena" (Hilaire Belloc) .v. intr. To be transcendent; excel. [Middle English transcenden, from Old French transcendre, from Latin transcendere : trans-, trans- + scandere, to climb. See skand-.] tran-scen-dent (tran-sendnt) adj. 1. Surpassing others; preeminent or supreme. 2. Lying beyond the ordinary range of perception: "fails to achieve a transcendent significance in suffering and squalor" (National Review) . 3. Philosophy. Transcending the Aristotelian categories. In Kant's theory of knowledge, being beyond the limits of experience and hence unknowable. 4. Being above and independent of the material universe. Used of the Deity.--tran-scen'dence or tran-scen'den-cy n. --tran-scen'dent-ly adv.

transmute trans-mute (trans-myoot, tranz-) v. trans-mut-ed, trans-mut-ing, trans-mutes.v. tr. To change from one form, nature, substance, or state into another; transform: "the tendency to transmute what has become customary into what has been divinely ordained" (Suzanne LaFollette See Synonyms at) .convert.v. intr. To undergo transmutation. [Middle English transmuten, from Latin transmutare : trans-, trans- + mutare, to change. See mei-1.] --trans-mut'a-bil'i-ty or trans-mut'a-ble-ness n. --trans-mut'a-ble adj. --trans-mut'a-bly adv. --trans-mut'er n. To undergo or cause to undergo radical change. v. transform, change, convert, metamorphose, mutate, transmogrify, transmute. To change or alter in structure, character, or substance. v. transform, metamorphose, mutate, transfigure, transmute, permute, modify, adjust, adapt, convert, remake, reshape, customize, differentiate, diversify, refashion, reform, remodel, restyle, variegate, vary.

unconditioned un-con-di-tioned (unkn-dishnd) adj. 1. Unconditional; unrestricted. 2. Psychology. Not dependent on or resulting from conditioning; unlearned or natural.--un'con-di'tioned-ness n.

undeified un- pref. 1. Not: unhappy. 2. Opposite of; contrary to: unrest. [Middle English, from Old English.] + deify de-i-fy (de-fi) v. tr. dei-fied, dei-fy-ing, dei-fies. 1. To make a god of; raise to the condition of a god. 2. To worship or revere as a god: deify a leader. 3. To idealize; exalt: deifying success. [Middle English deifien, from Old French deifier, from Late Latin deificare, from deificus, deific.] --de'i-fi'er n.

undifferentiated un- pref. 1. Not: unhappy. 2. Opposite of; contrary to: unrest. [Middle English, from Old English. See ne.] dif-fer-en-ti-ate (dif-renshe-at) v. dif-fer-en-ti-at-ed, dif-fer-en-ti-at-ing, dif-fer-en-ti-ates.v. tr. 1. To constitute the distinction between: subspecies that are differentiated by the markings on their wings. 2. To perceive or show the difference in or between; discriminate. 3. To make different by alteration or modification. 4. Mathematics. To calculate the derivative or differential of (a function) .v. intr. 1. To become distinct or specialized; acquire a different character. 2. To make distinctions; discriminate. 3. Biology. To undergo a progressive, developmental change to a more specialized form or function. Used especially of embryonic cells or tissues.--dif'fer-en'ti-a'tion n. To recognize as being different. v.differentiate, contradistinguish, contrast, discriminate, distinguish, pick out, tell apart. To make noticeable or different. v.individualize, particularize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, mark, qualify, set apart, set off, personalize, single out, type. To compare so as to reveal differences. v.contrast, compare, contradistinguish, judge, juxtapose, oppose, differentiate, distinguish. To change or alter in structure, character, or substance. v.transform, metamorphose, mutate, transfigure, transmute, permute, modify, adjust, adapt, convert, remake, reshape, customize, differentiate, diversify, refashion, reform, remodel, restyle, variegate, vary.

universe power
universe u-ni-verse (yoon-vurs) n. 1. All matter and energy, including Earth, the galaxies and all therein, and the contents of intergalactic space, regarded as a whole. 2. The earth together with all its inhabitants and created things. The human race. 3. The sphere or realm in which something exists or takes place. 4. Logic. See universe of discourse. [Middle English, from Old French univers, from Latin universum, from neuter of universus, whole : unus, one. oi-no-. + versus, past participle of vertere, to turn.] The totality of all existing things : universe, cosmos, creation, existence, life, macrocosm, nature, world.

+ power pow-er (pour) n. 1. The ability or capacity to perform or act effectively. 2. Often powers. A specific capacity, faculty, or aptitude: her powers of concentration. 3. Strength or force exerted or capable of being exerted; might. See Synonyms at strength. 4. The ability or official capacity to exercise control; authority. 5. A person, group, or nation having great influence or control over others: the western powers. 6. The might of a nation, political organization, or similar group. 7. Forcefulness; effectiveness: a novel of unusual power. 8. Chiefly Upper Southern U.S. A large number or amount. See Regional Note at powerful. 9. The energy or motive force by which a physical system or machine is operated: turbines turned by steam power; a sailing ship driven by wind power. The capacity of a system or machine to operate: a vehicle that runs under its own power. Electrical or mechanical energy, especially as used to assist or replace human energy. Electricity supplied to a home, building, or community: a storm that cut off power to the whole region. 10. Physics. The rate at which work is done, expressed as the amount of work per unit time and commonly measured in units such as the watt and horsepower. 11. Electricity. The product of applied potential difference and current in a direct-current circuit. The product of the effective values of the voltage and current with the cosine of the phase angle between current and voltage in an alternating-current circuit. 12. Mathematics. See exponent. (n., sense 3) The number of elements in a finite set. 13. Statistics. The probability of rejecting the null hypothesis where it is false. 14. A measure of the magnification of an optical instrument, such as a microscope or telescope. 15. powers. Theology. The sixth of the nine orders of angels. 16. Archaic. An armed force. adj. 1. Of or relating to political, social, or economic control: a power struggle; a power base. 2. Operated with mechanical or electrical energy in place of bodily exertion: a power tool; power car windows. 3. Of or relating to the generation or transmission of electricity: power companies; power lines. 4. Informal. Of or relating to influential business or professional practices: a pinstriped suit with a power tie; met with high-level executives at a power breakfast.v. tr. pow-ered, pow-er-ing, pow-ers. To supply with power, especially mechanical power. --idiom. powers that be. Those who hold effective power in a system or situation: a plan vetoed by the powers that be. [Middle English, from Old French poeir, to be able, power, from Vulgar Latin *potere, to be able, from potis, able, powerful.]

unqualifiedly un-qual-i-fied (un-kwol-fid) adj. 1. Lacking the proper or required qualifications: unqualified for the job. 2. Not modified by conditions or reservations; absolute: an unqualified refusal. --un-qual'i-fied'ly adv. Applying to or covering all instances or conditions. adj. blanket, absolute, arrant, complete, full, plenary, total, unqualified, unrestricted, wholesale. Antonyms: partial. Offensively conspicuous. adj. blatant, abject, barefaced, egregious, flagrant, glaring, open, out-and-out, outright, sheer, unmitigated, unqualified. Readily seen or sensed. adj. clear, distinct, conspicuous, visible, vivid, noticeable, observable, open, unconcealed, evident, perceptible, detectable, apparent, palpable, obvious, manifest, patent, plain, utter, sheer, downright, graphic, out-and-out, outright, barefaced, unambiguous, unequivocal, unmistakable, unqualified. Antonyms: indistinct, invisible, unclear, inconspicuous.

volition vo-li-tion (v-lishn) n. 1. The act or an instance of making a conscious choice or decision. 2. A conscious choice or decision. 3. The power or faculty of choosing; the will. [French, from Medieval Latin volitio, volition-, from Latin velle, vol-, to wish.] --vo-li'tion-al adj. --vo-li'tion-al-ly adv. The mental faculty by which one decides : judgment, discernment, discretion, volition, will, taste, judiciousness, discrimination, free will. will will (wil) n. 1. The mental faculty by which one deliberately chooses or decides upon a course of action; volition. The act of exercising the will. 2. Diligent purposefulness; determination: a candidate with the will to win. Self-control; self-discipline: lacked the will to overcome the addiction. 3. A desire, purpose, or determination, especially of one in authority: It is the sovereign's will that the prisoner be spared. 4. Deliberate intention or wish: Let it be known that I took this course of action against my will. 5. Free discretion; inclination or pleasure: wandered about, guided only by will. 6. Bearing or attitude toward others; disposition: full of good will. 7. A legal declaration of how a person wishes his or her possessions to be disposed of after death. A legally executed document containing this declaration.

warp warp (worp) v. warped, warp-ing, warps. v. tr. 1. To turn or twist (wood, for example) out of shape. 2. To turn from a correct or proper course; deflect. 3. To affect unfavorably, unfairly, or wrongly; bias. 4. To arrange (strands of yarn or thread) so that they run lengthwise in weaving. 5. Nautical. To move (a vessel) by hauling on a line that is fastened to or around a piling, an anchor, or a pier. v. intr. 1. To become bent or twisted out of shape: The wooden frame warped in the humidity. 2. To turn aside from a true, correct, or natural course; go astray, distort. 3. Nautical. To move a vessel by hauling on a line that is fastened to or around a piling, an anchor, or a pier. n. 1. The state of being twisted or bent out of shape. 2. A distortion or twist, especially in a piece of wood. 3. A mental or moral twist, aberration, or deviation. 4. The threads that run lengthwise in a woven fabric, crossed at right angles to the woof. 5. Warp and woof. 6. Nautical. A towline used in warping a vessel. [Middle English werpen, from Old English weorpan, to throw away.] --warp'er n. To ruin in character or quality. v. corrupt, bastardize, brutalize, canker, debase, debauch, defile, demoralize, degrade, deprave, pervert, stain, vitiate, warp. Antonyms: reform. To give an incorrect, imperfect, or misleading representation of. v. misrepresent, distort, falsify, skew, belie, color, confuse, garble, pervert, twist, warp. To cause to become impaired in quality or character. v. debase, bastardize, brutalize, contaminate, corrupt, debauch, defile, dishonor, demoralize, deprave, pervert, poison, rot, stain, vitiate, warp, muddy. Antonyms: enhance, improve.

woof woof (woof, woof) n. 1. The threads that run crosswise in a woven fabric, at right angles to the warp threads. 2. The texture of a fabric. [Alteration (influenced by WARP) , of Middle English oof, from Old English owef : o-, on, on. See ON + wefan, to weave. See webh-.]