Vocabulary in Papers 1 through 11

abdicated v. To relinquish (power or responsibility) formally. 1. To surrender or relinquish, as sovereign power; to withdraw definitely from filling or exercising, as a high office, station, dignity; as, to abdicate the throne, the crown, the papacy. The cross-bearers abdicated their service. – Gibbon. 2. To renounce; to relinquish; – said of authority, a trust, duty, right, etc. He abdicates all right to be his own governor. – Burke. The understanding abdicates its functions. – Froude. Syn: To give up; quit; vacate; relinquish; forsake; abandon; resign; renounce; desert. Usage: to abdicate, to resign: Abdicate commonly expresses the act of a monarch in voluntary and formally yielding up sovereign authority; as, to abdicate the government. Resign is applied to the act of any person, high or low, who gives back an office or trust into the hands of him who conferred it.

abide v. abode or abided or abiding, abides (11) v -tr. 1. To wait patiently for. 2. To be in store for; await. 3. To withstand; persevere under. 4. To accept the consequences of. 5. To put up with; tolerate: can't abide such incompetence. -intr. 1. To remain in one place or state. 2. To continue; endure. 3. To dwell or sojourn. Phrasal verb. abide by (9) To conform to; comply with. [ME abiden < OE abidan : a- (intensive) + bidan, to remain.] abider n. abiding adj. Long-lasting; enduring. abidingly adv. abiding place of Deity = Paradise. “Even though I [Divine Counselor] hail from the very abiding place of Deity, I cannot presume to speak with perfection of understanding concerning the infinity of many of the divine attributes.”

abrogate v. Revoke formally. To abolish, do away with, or annul, especially by authority. [Latin abrogare, abrogat- : ab-, away. See AB- + rogare, to ask.]

absolute adj. 1. Perfect in quality or nature; complete. 2. Not mixed; pure. 3. Not limited by restrictions or exceptions; unconditional: absolute trust. Unqualified in extent or degree; total; final and not liable to modification: absolute silence. 4. Unconstrained by constitutional or other provisions; free from qualification, condition, exception, or restriction: an absolute ruler. 5. Not to be doubted or questioned; positive: absolute proof. (Philosophy.) 1. Something regarded as the ultimate basis of all thought and being. 2. Something regarded as independent of and unrelated to anything else.

accordance n. 1. Agreement; conformity: in accordance with your instructions. 2. The act of granting. Use: “in accordance with.” accord tr.v. accorded according accords 1. To cause to conform or agree; bring into harmony. 2. To grant; bestow upon: I accord you my blessing. -intr.v. To be in agreement, unity, or harmony. -n. 1. Agreement; harmony. 2. A settlement or compromise of conflicting opinions. 3. A settlement of points at issue between nations. Idiom Section: of (one's) own accord. Voluntarily. [ME accorden < OFr. acorder < Med. Lat. accordare : Lat. ad-, to + Lat. cor, heart.] according to prep. 1. As stated or indicated by; on the authority of: according to historians. 2. In keeping with; in agreement with: according to instructions. 3. As determined by: a list arranged according to the alphabet. accordingly adv. 1. Correspondingly. 2. Consequently.

acme n. The highest point of attainment or development; peak; the point of utmost attainment. [Gk. akme.]

actuality n. actualities n.pl. 1. The state or fact of being actual; reality. 2. actualities Actual conditions or facts. actual adj. 1. Existing in fact or reality: questioned her actual intentions. 2. Being, existing, or acting at the present moment; current. 3. Corresponding to all human facts. 4. Based on fact: an actual account. [ME < OFr. actuel < Lat. actualis < actus, acting < agere, to do.] actually adv. as an actual or existing fact; really. Actual n. The union of the three Absolutes of Actuality: the Eternal Son, the Infinite Spirit, and Paradise. (1262/15,23). actualize tr.v. actualized actualizing actualizes to make actual.

actualizes v. 1. To realize in action or make real: “More flexible life patterns could... nurture and renew our spirits through opportunities to actualize personal dreams” (Fred Best). 2. To describe or portray realistically. Existence. Actual conditions or facts.

adequate adj. 1: (sometimes followed by “to”) meeting the requirements especially of a task; “she had adequate training”; “her training was adequate”; “she was adequate to the job” [ant: inadequate] 2: enough to meet a purpose; “an adequate income”; “the food was adequate”; “a decent wage”; “enough food”; “food enough” [syn: decent, enough] 3: about average; acceptable; “more than adequate as a secretary” [syn: passable, fair to middling] Equal to some requirement; proportionate, or correspondent; fully sufficient; as, powers adequate to a great work; an adequate definition. Syn: Proportionate; commensurate; sufficient; suitable; competent; capable.

adjudication n. The final judgment in a legal proceeding; the act of pronouncing judgment based on the evidence presented. The act of adjudicating; the act or process of trying and determining judicially. [L. adjudicatio: cf. F. adjudication.]

administrator n. One who administers affairs; one who directs, manages, executes, or dispenses, whether in civil, judicial, political, or ecclesiastical affairs; a manager. Someone who administers a business [syn: decision maker].

adorable adj. 1. Deserving to be adored; worthy of divine honors. 2. Worthy of the utmost love or respect. The adorable Author of Christianity. – Cheyne. 3. Delightful, lovable, and charming: an adorable set of twins.

advisory adj. 1. Empowered to advise: an advisory committee. Having power to advise; containing advice; as, an advisory council; their opinion is advisory, consultive. 2. Relating to or containing advice, especially a warning: an advisory memorandum regarding the weather.

affectionate adj. 1. Having or showing fond feelings or affection; loving; tender. 2. Obsolete. Strongly or favorably disposed. affectionately adv. affectionateness n. affection n. affections n.pl. 1. A fond or tender feeling toward another. 2. Feeling or emotion: an unbalanced state of affections. 3. Any pathological condition of the mind or body. 4. The act of influencing, affecting, or acting upon. 5. The state of being influenced or acted upon. 6. An attribute. 7. Mental disposition or tendency. [ME affeccioun < OFr. affection < Lat. affectio < afficere, to affect, influence.] affectional adj. affectionally adv.

afford v. To give forth; to supply, yield, or produce as the natural result, fruit, or issue; as, grapes afford wine; olives afford oil; the earth affords fruit; the sea affords an abundant supply of fish. 2. To give, grant, or confer, with a remoter reference to its being the natural result; to provide; to furnish; as, a good life affords consolation in old age. His tuneful Muse affords the sweetest numbers. – Addison. The quiet lanes . . . afford calmer retreats. – Gilpin. 1. To make available; provide: a sport affording good exercise; a tree that affords ample shade. 2. To manage to spare or give up: can't afford an hour for lunch. 3. To manage or bear without disadvantage or risk to oneself: can afford to be tolerant. 4. To have the financial means for; bear the cost of: able to afford a new car.

affront n. insult – (a deliberately offensive act or something producing the effect of an affront; “turning his back on me was a deliberate insult”)

aggregate adj 1: gathered or tending to gather into a mass or whole; “aggregate expenses include expenses of all divisions combined for the entire year”; “the aggregated amount of indebtedness” [syn: aggregated, aggregative, mass] 2: formed of separate units in a cluster; “raspberries are aggregate fruits” n 1: a sum total of many heterogenous things taken together [syn: congeries, conglomeration] 2: the whole amount [syn: sum, total, totality] v 1: amount in the aggregate to 2: gather in a mass, sum, or whole [syn: combine]

alienating v. 1. estrange, alienate, alien, disaffect – (arouse hostility or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendliness) 2. alien, alienate – (transfer property or ownership; “The will aliened the property to the heirs”)

allied adj. 1. Joined or united in a close relationship: allied tribes. To unite, or form a connection between, as between families by marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league, or confederacy; – often followed by to or with. 2. To connect or form a relation between by similitude, resemblance, friendship, or love. These three did love each other dearly well, And with so firm affection were allied. – Spenser.

allude v. To make an indirect reference: The candidate alluded to the recent war by saying, “We've all made sacrifices.” To refer to something indirectly or by suggestion; to have reference to a subject not specifically and plainly mentioned: refer; point; indicate; hint; suggest; intimate; signify; insinuate; advert.

altruistic adj. altruistic (vs. egoistic), selfless – (showing unselfish concern for the welfare of others)

ancestor n. 1. A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear. 2. A forerunner or predecessor.

ancestral adj Of, relating to, or evolved from an ancestor or ancestors.

annihilation n 1. destruction by annihilating something [syn: obliteration] 2. total destruction; “bomb tests resulted in the annihilation of the atoll” [syn: disintegration] 1. The act of reducing to nothing, or nonexistence; or the act of destroying the form or combination of parts under which a thing exists, so that the name can no longer be applied to it; as, the annihilation of a corporation. 2. The state of being annihilated. – Hooker.

annul v. 1. To reduce to nothing; to obliterate. To make or declare void or invalid, as a marriage or a law; nullify. To obliterate the effect or existence of: Light, the prime work of God, to me's extinct. And all her various objects of delight Annulled. – Milton. 2. To make void or of no effect; to nullify; to abolish; to do away with; – used appropriately of laws, decrees, edicts, decisions of courts, or other established rules, permanent usages, and the like, which are made void by component authority. Do they mean to annul laws of inestimable value to our liberties? – Burke. 3. To declare (a marriage) to have never validly existed —(cf. divorce); to make legally void; to declare to no longer have legal effect. Syn: To abolish; abrogate; repeal; cancel; reverse; rescind; revoke; nullify; destroy.

antecedent causation = antecedent + causation 1 a : the act or process of causing b: the act or agency that produces an effect 2: the relation between cause and effect esp. as an element to be proven in a tort or criminal case: must be “legal” causation between the acts and the results.

antecedent adj : preceding in time or order [syn: preceding] [ant: subsequent] n 1: someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote than a grandparent) [syn: ancestor, ascendant, ascendent, root] [ant: descendant] 2: a preceding occurrence or cause or event 3: anything that precedes something similar in time; “phrenology was an antecedent of modern neuroscience” [syn: forerunner] 4: the referent of an anaphor; a phrase or clause that is referred to by an anaphoric pronoun

anthropomorphism n. the representation of objects (especially a god) as having human form or traits

antigravity adj. The effect of reducing or canceling a gravitational field.

appalling (-poling) adj. Causing consternation or dismay; frightful: appalling working conditions; appalling violence. --ap-pall'ing-ly adv. Arousing fear, horror, or loathing. adj. alarming, dreadful, scary, fearsome, frightening, terrifying, weird, eldritch, dire, direful, awful, appalling, terrific, horrendous, shocking, terrible, frightful, disgusting, odious, revolting, hideous, loathsome, repulsive, nightmarish, monstrous, horrific, horrible, grisly, ghastly, gruesome, macabre, morbid, atrocious, brutish, grotesque, ghoulish, hateful, horrid. Antonyms: appealing, pleasant, attractive, lovely. Shockingly evil, frightening, or ugly. adj. abominable, heinous, abhorrent, bestial, odious, horrible, horrid, horrific, hideous, bloodcurdling, monstrous, gruesome, freakish, frightful, grotesque, terrifying, dreadful, scary, shocking, bizarre, appalling, awful. Antonyms: pleasant, pleasing, attractive, inviting, delightful, charming, agreeable, lovely. To affect with a strong feeling of moral aversion. v. scandalize, appall, affront, disturb, horrify, offend, outrage, shock, upset. To offend the sensibilities or propriety of. v. displease, upset, jar, put off, turn off, shock, appall, disgust, nauseate, turn one's stomach, repel, repulse, revolt, sicken, horrify, traumatize, alienate, gross out (slang). Antonyms: please, delight, enchant, captivate. To fill with consternation or fear. v. alarm, distress, awe, overawe, appall, dismay, consternate, agitate, cow, menace, daunt, frighten, scare, scare stiff, terrify, terrorize, paralyze, spook, panic, petrify, horrify, appall. Antonyms: calm, soothe, comfort, reassure.

apparent (-parnt, -par-) adj. 1. Readily seen; visible. 2. Readily understood; clear or obvious. 3. Appearing as such but not necessarily so; seeming: an apparent advantage. [Middle English, from Old French aparant, present participle of aparoir, to appear.] --ap-par'ent-ly adv. --ap-par'ent-ness n. SYNONYM: apparent, clear, clear-cut, distinct, evident, manifest, obvious, patent, plain The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "readily seen, perceived, or understood": Angry for no apparent reason; a clear danger; clear-cut evidence of tampering; distinct fingerprints; evident hostility; manifest pleasure; obvious errors; patent advantages; making my meaning plain. USAGE NOTES: Used before a noun, apparent means "seeming": For all his apparent wealth, Pat had no money to pay the rent. Used after a form of the verb be, however, apparent can mean either "seeming" (as in His virtues are only apparent) or "obvious" (as in The effects of the drought are apparent to anyone who sees the parched fields). Writers should take care that the intended meaning is clear from the context. Readily seen or sensed. adj. clear, distinct, conspicuous, visible, vivid, noticeable, observable, open, unconcealed, evident, perceptible, detectable, apparent, palpable, obvious, manifest, patent, plain, utter, sheer, downright, graphic, out-and-out, outright, barefaced, unambiguous, unequivocal, unmistakable, unqualified. Antonyms: indistinct, invisible, unclear, inconspicuous. Easy to notice. adj. apparent, conspicuous, discernible, evident, manifest, noticeable, observable, perceptible, unmistakable, visible. Antonyms: inconspicuous, imperceptible.

appeased v. 1. pacify, conciliate, assuage, appease, mollify, placate, gentle, gruntle – (cause to be more favorably inclined; gain the good will of; “She managed to mollify the angry customer”) 2. quell, stay, appease – (overcome or allay; “quell my hunger”) 3. propitiate, appease – (make peace with)

appellation n. appellations n.pl. 1. A name or title. 2. The act of naming. Syn: denomination, designation, appellative – (identifying word or words by which someone or something is called and classified or distinguished from others) [ME appelacion < Lat. appellatio < appellare, to entreat.]

appraisal n. appraisals n.pl. 1. The act of appraising. 2. An expert or official valuation of something, as for taxation. appraise tr.v. appraised -praising -praises 1. To evaluate, esp. in an official capacity. 2. To estimate the quality, amount, size, and other features of; judge. [ME appreisen, alteration of apprisen < OFr. aprisier < LLat. appretiare : Lat. ad-, to + Lat. pretium, price.] appraisable adj. appraisement n. appraiser n.

appropriate adj. Suitable for a particular person, condition, occasion, or place; proper; fitting. appropriate -tr.v.

arbitrary adj. (vs. nonarbitrary) 1. Determined by whim or impulse, not by reason or law; based on or subject to individual discretion or preference or sometimes impulse or caprice. 2. Based on or subject to individual judgment or discretion. 3. Established by a court or judge rather than by a specific law or statute. 4. Not limited by law; despotic. [ME arbitrarie < Lat. arbitrarius < arbiter, arbiter.] arbitrarily adv. arbitrariness n. – (“an arbitrary decision”; “the arbitrary rule of a dictator”; “an arbitrary penalty”; “of arbitrary size and shape”; “an arbitrary choice”; “arbitrary division of the group into halves”) arbitrarily adv. arbitrariness n.

ascension n. 1. rise, rising, ascent, ascension – (a movement upward; “they cheered the rise of the hot-air balloon”) (astronomy) the rising of a star above the horizon) rise, ascent, ascension, ascending – (the act of changing location in an upward direction)

aspect n. aspects n.pl. 1. A particular facial expression; air: a soldier of grim aspect. 2. Appearance to the eye, esp. when seen from a specific view. 3. The way in which an idea, problem, or situation is viewed by the mind: all aspects of the case. 4. A position facing or commanding a given direction; exposure. 5. A side or surface facing in a particular direction: the ventral aspect of the body. 6. The configuration of the stars or planets in relation to one another or to the subject, thought by astrologers to influence human affairs. Archaic. A gaze; look. [ME < Lat. aspectus, a view, p.part. of aspicere, to look at : ad-, toward + specere, to look.]

aspire intr.v. aspired aspiring aspires 1. To have a great ambition or ultimate goal; desire strongly: aspired to be an actress, aspired to stardom. 2. To strive toward an end: aspiring to great knowledge. 3. To desire with eagerness; to seek to attain something high or great; to pant; to long; to aspire after immorality. 4. To strive toward an end; aim at: aspiring to great knowledge. 3. Archaic. To rise upward; soar. [ME aspiren < Lat. aspirare, to desire. -see aspirate.] aspirer n. aspiringly adv.

assenting v. (agreeing with or consenting to)

assign tr.v. assigned assigning assigns 1. To set apart for a particular purpose; designate. 2. To select for a duty or office; appoint. 3. To give out as a task; allot. 4. To ascribe; attribute. 5. Law. To transfer (property, rights, or interests). 6. To place (a unit or personnel) integrally into a particular military organization. -n. Law. An assignee. [ME assignen < OFr. assignir < Lat. assignare : ad-, to + signare, to mark < signum, sign.] assignability n. assignable adj. assignably adv. assigner n. assignment n. assignments n.pl. 1. The act of assigning. 2. Something assigned, as a task. 3. A position or post of duty to which one is assigned. 4. Law. a. The transfer of a claim, right, interest, or property. b. The document or deed by which this transfer is made.

astir adj. Moving about; being in motion. Stirring; in a state of activity or motion.

attain v. attained attaining attains -tr. 1. To gain, reach, or accomplish by mental or physical effort. 2. To arrive at, as in time. -intr. To succeed in gaining or reaching: He attained to the highest office in the land. [ME atteignen < OFr. ataindre, to reach to < Lat. attingere : ad-, to + tangere, to touch.] attainability attainableness n. attainable adj. attainables n. from adj. attainable. Those things which can be attained or achieved. attainer n. attainers n.pl. One who attains or achieves the acquirement of something.

attainment n. attainments n.pl. 1. The act of attaining or the condition of being attained. 2. Something that is attained; accomplishment. attainment rest. The terminal sleep of time, the rest experienced by ascenders on their voyage from the inner circle of Havona to the resurrection of eternity and residential status on Paradise. The ascender is joined in this attainment rest by his long-time associate, a complement of rest. The attainment rest is true rest, the relaxation of the ages. (297/36, 299/4sec).

attenuate v. attenuated -ating -ates -tr. 1. To make slender, fine, or small. 2. To reduce in force, value, or amount; weaken. 3. To lessen the density of; rarefy. 4. Biology. To make less virulent. -intr. To become thin, weak, or fine. -adj. 1. Reduced or weakened, as in strength or value. 2. Botany. Gradually tapering to a slender point. [Lat. attenuare, to make thin : ad-, to + tenuis, thin.] attenuable adj. attenuation n. attenuations n.pl. 1. the act of attenuating or the state of being attenuated. 2. the process by which a virus, bacterium, etc., changes under laboratory conditions to become harmless or less virulent. attenuators n.pl. of attenuator n. A device that reduces the amplitude of an electrical signal with little or no distortion.

attenuations n. The act or process of making slender, or the state of being slender; emaciation. 2. The act of attenuating; the act of making thin or less dense, or of rarefying, as fluids or gases. 3. The process of weakening in intensity; diminution of virulence; as, the attenuation of virus. 4. A dilution, thinning, or weakening of a substance; a lessening of the amount, force, or magnitude of something; weakening in force or intensity; “attenuation in the volume of the sound” [syn: fading] specifically: a weakening of the connection between an illegal police procedure and the evidence obtained by it such that the evidence is admissible at trial as an exception to the exclusionary rule or a reduction in the virulence of a pathogen through repeated inoculation, growth in a different culture medium, or exposure to heat, light, air or other weakening agents or the energy loss of an ultrasonic beam as it passes through a material. (Communications) The progressive reduction in amplitude of a signal as it travels farther from the point of origin. For example, an electric signal's amplitude reduces with distance due to electrical impedance. Attenuation is usually measured in decibels [per metre]. Attenuation does not imply appreciable modification of the shape of the waveform (distortion), though as the signal amplitude falls the signal-to-noise ratio will also fall unless the channel itself is noise free or the signal is amplified at some intermediate point(s) along the channel.

attribute n. (atr-byoot). 1. A quality or characteristic inherent in or ascribed to someone or something. 2. An object associated with and serving to identify a character, a personage, or an office: Lightning bolts are an attribute of Zeus. [Latin attribuere, attribut- : ad-, ad- + tribuere, to allot. TRIBUTE.] attribute (-tribyoot) v.tr. at-trib-ut-ed, at-trib-ut-ing, at-trib-utes. 1. To relate to a particular cause or source; ascribe. 2. To regard as the work of a specified agent or creator: attributed the painting to Titian.  --at-trib'ut-a-ble adj. --at-trib'ut-er or at-trib'u-tor n. SYNONYM: attribute, ascribe, impute, credit, assign, refer These verbs mean to consider as resulting from, proper to, or belonging to a person or thing. Attribute and ascribe, often interchangeable, have the widest application: a symphony attributed to Mozart; an invention ascribed to the 15th century. Impute is often used in laying guilt or fault to another: "We usually ascribe good; but impute evil" (Samuel Johnson). Credit frequently applies to an accomplishment or virtue: "Some excellent remarks were made on immortality, but mainly borrowed from and credited to Plato" (Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr). Assign and refer are often used to classify or categorize according to character or chronology: Program music as a genre is usually assigned to the Romantic period. "A person thus prepared will be able to refer any particular history he takes up to its proper place in universal history" (Joseph Priestley). An essential and distinctive element : characteristic, savor, affection, attribute, character, feature, mark, property, quality, trait, virtue, aspect, earmark, trademark, mannerism, peculiarity. To regard as belonging to or resulting from another. v. attribute, accredit, assign, acknowledge, ascribe, blame, charge, credit, impute, lay, refer, pin, place, trace to

austere adj. severe, stark – (severely simple; “a stark interior”) 2. stern – (of a stern or strict bearing or demeanor; forbidding in aspect; “an austere expression”; “a stern face”) 3. ascetic, ascetical, spartan – (practicing great self-denial; “a desert nomad's austere life”)

authentic adj. 1. Having a genuine original or authority, in opposition to that which is false, fictitious, counterfeit, or apocryphal; being what it purports to be; genuine; not of doubtful origin; real; as, an authentic paper or register. To be avenged On him who had stole Jove's authentic fire. – Milton. 2. Of approved authority; true; trustworthy; credible; as, an authentic writer; an authentic portrait; authentic information. Syn: Authentic, Genuine. Usage: These words, as here compared, have reference to historical documents. We call a document genuine when it can be traced back ultimately to the author or authors from whom it professes to emanate. Hence, the word has the meaning, “not changed from the original, uncorrupted, unadulterated:'' as, a genuine text. We call a document authentic when, on the ground of its being thus traced back, it may be relied on as true and authoritative (from the primary sense of “having an author, vouched for”); hence its extended signification, in general literature, of trustworthy, as resting on unquestionable authority or evidence; as, an authentic history; an authentic report of facts. Conforming to fact and therefore worthy of belief; “an authentic account by an eyewitness”; “reliable information” [syn: reliable] Not counterfeit or copied; “an authentic signature” [syn: bona fide, unquestionable, veritable]

authority (-thori-te, -thor-, o-thor-, o-thor-) n.pl. au-thor-i-ties. 1. The power to enforce laws, exact obedience, command, determine, or judge. One that is invested with this power, especially a government or government officials: land titles issued by the civil authority. 2. Power assigned to another; authorization: Deputies were given authority to make arrests. 3. A public agency or corporation with administrative powers in a specified field: a city transit authority. 4. An accepted source of expert information or advice: a noted authority on birds; a reference book often cited as an authority. A quotation or citation from such a source: biblical authorities for a moral argument. 5. Justification; grounds: On what authority do you make such a claim? 6. A conclusive statement or decision that may be taken as a guide or precedent. 7. Power to influence or persuade resulting from knowledge or experience: political observers who acquire authority with age. 8. Confidence derived from experience or practice; firm self-assurance: played the sonata with authority. [Middle English auctorite, from Old French autorite, from Latin auctoritas, auctoritat-, from auctor, creator. AUTHOR.] A person of great wisdom or extensive knowledge : savant, sage, polymath, pundit, scholar, arbiter, authority, diviner, expert, genius, guru, highbrow, intellectual. Antonyms: idiot, moron. A person with profound knowledge of a subject : scholar, authority, academician, expert, professor, pundit, savant, specialist, sage, learned person, erudite person. The right and power to govern or judge : authority, command, control, domination, dominion, mastery, might, power, sway, force, weight, rule, supremacy. Antonyms: servility, servitude, weakness. A person with great knowledge or skill in a field : expert, ace (informal), adept, authority, dab hand, genius, maestro, maven (informal), prodigy, professional, specialist, virtuoso, whiz, whiz kid, wizard. Antonyms: amateur, tyro, novice. A person who evaluates and reports on worth : appraiser, arbiter, evaluator, authority, connoisseur, critic, expert. Someone who specializes in a subject for the purpose of evaluating : critic, commentator, evaluator, observer, student, judge, expert, authority, analyst.

authorize (oth-riz) v. tr. au-thor-ized, au-thor-iz-ing, au-thor-iz-es. 1. To grant authority or power to. 2. To give permission for; sanction: the city agency that authorizes construction projects. 3. To be sufficient grounds for; justify. [Middle English auctorisen, from Old French autoriser, from Medieval Latin auctorizare, from Latin auctor, author.] --au'thor-iz'er n. SYNONYM: authorize, accredit, commission, empower, license The central meaning shared by these verbs is "to give someone the authority to act": authorized her partner to negotiate in her behalf; a representative who was accredited by his government; commissioned the real-estate agent to purchase the house for us; was empowered to make decisions during the president's absence; a pharmacist licensed to practice in two states. To afford with opportunity, permission, or ability. v. allow, enable, let, indulge, permit, entrust, grant, license, entitle, authorize, okay, OK, assent to, consent to, endorse, empower, enfranchise, franchise, give one's blessing to. Antonyms: disallow, deny, refuse, forbid, prohibit. To put in force by legal authority. v. authorize, decree, enact, institute, legislate, ordain, ratify, license, entitle. To mark with an indication of official sanction. v. validate, countersign, execute, seal, sign, legalize, authorize, certify, stamp, ratify, authenticate, sanction, warrant. Antonyms: invalidate, cancel, void, annul.

baffle (bafl)v. tr. baf-fled, baf-fling, baf-fles. 1. To frustrate or check (a person) as by confusing or perplexing; stymie. 2. To impede the force or movement of. n. 1. A usually static device that regulates the flow of a fluid or light. 2. A partition that prevents interference between sound waves in a loudspeaker. [Perhaps blend of Scottish Gaelic bauchle, to denounce, revile publicly, and French bafouer, to ridicule.] --baf'fle-ment n. --baf'fler n. To prevent from being successful. v. foil, thwart, frustrate, balk, hinder, prevent, check, nip, baffle, beat, bilk, buffalo (informal), circumvent, dash, disappoint. Antonyms: advance, promote. To escape the understanding or grasp of. v. stump, elude, mystify, baffle, dumbfound, perplex, foil, stymie, befog. To upset in mind or purpose. v.confuse, baffle, disconcert, nonplus, perplex, fluster, befuddle, muddle, bewilder, addle, puzzle, discombobulate, confound, fuddle, stump, stymie, throw, buffalo, distract, dizzy, flummox, ball up. Antonyms: enlighten

barbarous adj. brutal, cruel, fell, roughshod, savage, vicious – (of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or suffering; “a barbarous crime”; “brutal beatings”; “cruel tortures”; “Stalin's roughshod treatment of the kulaks”; “a savage slap”; “vicious kicks”) (primitive in customs and culture)

beckon v. 1. To signal or summon, as by nodding or waving. 2. To attract because of an inviting or enticing appearance: "a lovely, sunny country that seemed to beckon them on to the Emerald City" (L. Frank Baum).v. intr. 1. To make a signaling or summoning gesture. 2. To be inviting or enticing.n. A gesture of summons.[Middle English bekenen, from Old English becnan.]

belligerent n. Inclined or eager to fight; hostile or aggressive. 2. Of, pertaining to, or engaged in warfare. One that is hostile or aggressive, especially one that is engaged in war.[Latin belligerans, belligerant-, present participle of belligerare, to wage war, from belliger, warlike : bellum, war + gerere, to make.] combatant, battler, fighter, scrapper – (someone who fights or is fighting)

beneficence n. 1. The state or quality of being kind, charitable, or beneficial. 2. A charitable act or gift. The practice of doing good; active goodness, kindness, or charity; bounty springing from purity and goodness. And whose beneficence no charge exhausts. – Cowper.

beneficent adj. 1. beneficent (vs. maleficent) – (doing or producing good; “the most beneficent regime in history”) 2. beneficent, benevolent, gracious – (doing or producing good) 3. beneficent, benevolent, eleemosynary, philanthropic – (generous in assistance to the poor; “a benevolent contributor”; “eleemosynary relief”; “philanthropic contributions”) beneficently adv. Characterized by or performing acts of kindness or charity. Producing benefit; beneficial.

bestow v. bestowed bestowing bestows 1. To present as a gift or honor; confer, present. 2. To apply; use. 3. Archaic. To store or house. [ME bestowen.] bestowable adj. bestower n. bestowers n.pl. One who bestows or gives. “The university conferred a degree on its most famous former student, who never graduated”; “bestow an honor on someone” [syn: confer] 2: give as a gift 3: bestow a quality on; “Her presence lends a certain cachet to the company”; “The music added a lot to the play”; “She brings a special atmosphere to our meetings”; “This adds a light note to the program” [syn: lend, impart, contribute, add, bring] [Middle English bistowen : bi-, be- + stowen, to place.]

bestowal n. bestowals n.pl. The gift of an incarnated life by a spiritual being upon a planet inhabited by less advanced beings, whether mortal, morontial, or spiritual. On evolutionary planets, bestowed beings usually incarnate in the form of adult males of the realm, although some arrive on a planet as a male babe born of woman, and still others may be invisible. In the case of Creator Sons such as Michael, the bestowal experience allows them grow in understanding of their own creatures through sharing their life experiences, while being otherwise dedicated to revealing the love of the Universal Father and Eternal Son. The attribute of bestowal is inherent in the Paradise Sons of God, and its technique is a secret of Sonarington. The Eternal Son bestowed himself seven times upon the circuits of Havona. [Middle English bistowen : bi-, be- + stowen, to place.]

bona fide adj. [Latin, “in good faith”] 1. Made or carried out in good faith; undertaken in good faith; sincere: “a bona fide offer.” 2. Authentic; genuine; unquestionable, veritable; not counterfeit or copied: (a bona fide Rembrandt; “a bona fide signature”; “a bona fide manuscript”; “a bona fide antique”; “photographs taken in a bona fide bull ring”).

capacity (k-pasi-te)n.pl. ca-pac-i-ties. 1. The ability to receive, hold, or absorb. A measure of this ability; volume. 2. The maximum amount that can be contained: a trunk filled to capacity. 3. Ability to perform or produce; capability. The maximum or optimum amount that can be produced: factories operating below capacity. 4. The power to learn or retain knowledge; mental ability. 5. Innate potential for growth, development, or accomplishment; faculty. Ability. 6. The quality of being suitable for or receptive to specified treatment: the capacity of elastic to be stretched. 7. The position in which one functions; role: in your capacity as sales manager. 8. Legal qualification or authority: the capacity to make an arrest. 9. Electricity. Capacitance. adj. Filling a space with the most it can hold: a capacity crowd at the concert. [Middle English capacite, from Old French, from Latin capacitas, from capax, capac-, spacious. CAPACIOUS.] The power to perform a task : capability, capacity, ability, competence, facility, faculty, knack, means, might, mind, potential, skill, wherewithal. Antonyms: inadequacy, incompetence, ineptitude, inability.

cataclysms n. 1. catastrophe – (a sudden violent change in the earth's surface) 2. calamity, catastrophe, disaster, tragedy – (an event resulting in great loss and misfortune; “the whole city was affected by the irremediable calamity”; “the earthquake was a disaster”)

catastrophic (kat-strofik) adj. 1. Of, relating to, or involving a catastrophe. 2. Involving or resulting in substantial, often ruinous medical expense: a catastrophic illness.--cat'a-stroph'i-cal-ly adv. ca-tas-tro-phe (k-tastr-fe) n. 1. A great, often sudden calamity. See Synonyms at disaster. 2. A complete failure; a fiasco: The food was cold, the guests quarreled--the whole dinner was a catastrophe. 3. The concluding action of a drama, especially a classical tragedy, following the climax and containing a resolution of the plot. 4. A sudden violent change in the earth's surface; a cataclysm. [Greek katastrophe, an overturning, ruin, conclusion, from katastrephein, to ruin, undo : kata-, cata- + strephein, to turn.] A severe misfortune, usually unexpected : disaster, accident, adversity, blow, calamity, cataclysm, catastrophe, crisis, emergency, fiasco, misadventure, misfortune, tragedy. Antonyms: blessing, good fortune, benefit.

census n. An official, usually periodic enumeration of a population, often including the collection of related demographic information. A usually complete count of a population (as of a state); especially, a periodic governmental count of a population that usually includes social and economic information (as occupations, ages, and incomes).

cessation n. A bringing or coming to an end; a ceasing, stopping: a cessation of hostilities. [Middle English cessacioun, from Old French cessation, from Latin cessti, cesstin-, from cesstus, past participle of cessre, to stop. cease.]

challenge (chalnj)n. 1. A call to engage in a contest, fight, or competition: a challenge to a duel. An act or statement of defiance; a call to confrontation: a challenge to the government's authority. 2. A demand for explanation or justification; a calling into question: a challenge to a theory. 3. A sentry's call to an unknown party for proper identification. 4. A test of one's abilities or resources in a demanding but stimulating undertaking: a career that offers a challenge. 5. A claim that a vote is invalid or that a voter is unqualified. 6. Law. A formal objection to the inclusion of a prospective juror in a jury. 7. Immunology. The induction or evaluation of an immune response in an organism by administration of a specific antigen to which it has been sensitized. v. chal-lenged, chal-leng-ing, chal-leng-es.v. tr. 1. To call to engage in a contest, fight, or competition: challenged me to a game of chess. To invite with defiance; dare: challenged him to contradict her. Defy. 2. To take exception to; call into question; dispute: a book that challenges established beliefs. 3. To order to halt and be identified, as by a sentry. 4. Law. To take formal objection to (a prospective juror). 5. To question the qualifications of (a voter) or validity of (a vote). 6. To have due claim to; call for: events that challenge our attention. 7. To summon to action, effort, or use; stimulate: a problem that challenges the imagination. 8. Immunology. To induce or evaluate an immune response in (an organism) by administering a specific antigen to which it has been sensitized. v. intr. 1. To make or give voice to a challenge. 2. To begin barking upon picking up the scent. Used of hunting dogs. [Middle English chalenge, from Old French, from Latin calumnia, trickery, false accusation. See CALUMNY., V., from Middle English chalengen, from Old French chalangier, from Latin calumniari, from calumnia, calumny.] --chal'lenge-a-ble adj. The act of expressing opposition : objection, challenge, expostulation, protest, protestation, remonstrance. Antonyms: agreement, approval, consent. An act that is intentionally provocative : provocation, challenge, dare, defiance, taunt, goad, spur, vexation, pique, perturbation. To confront boldly and courageously. v. brave, beard, challenge, dare, defy, face, resist, stand up to, throw down the gauntlet, look in the eye, front, venture. To be in opposition to. v. oppose, buck, challenge, antagonize, combat, contest, dispute, fight, resist, traverse. Antonyms: support. To call on (someone) to do something requiring boldness. v. challenge, contest, dare, throw down the gauntlet, summon, bid. To be uncertain, disbelieving, or skeptical about. v. doubt, beware, challenge, contest, disbelieve, distrust, mistrust, question, smell a rat, suspect, feel uncertain. Antonyms: believe, trust, rely on. To give no credence to. v. disbelieve, challenge, discredit, dispute, distrust, mistrust, question, suspect, doubt. Antonyms: believe, trust.

circuits n. 1. 1. A closed, usually circular line that goes around an object or area. 2. The region enclosed by such a line. 2. A path or route the complete traversal of which without local change of direction requires returning to the starting point, or the act of following such a path or route, or a journey made on such a path or route. 3. Electronics. A closed path followed or capable of being followed by an electric current, or a configuration of electrically or electromagnetically connected components or devices. 4. a. A regular or accustomed course from place to place; a round: a popular speaker on the lecture circuit. b. The area or district thus covered, especially a territory under the jurisdiction of a judge in which periodic court sessions are held.

circumscribe v. circumscribed, circumscribing, circumscribes 1. To draw a line around; encircle: (“He drew a circle around the points”). 2. To limit narrowly; restrict; confine: (“I limit you to two visits to the pub a day”). 3. To determine the limits of; define; circumscribe – (to draw a geometric figure around another figure so that the two are in contact but do not intersect) [Middle English circumscriben, from Latin circumscrbere : circum-, circum- + scrbere, to write]

clamoring n. hue and cry – (loud and persistent outcry from many people; “he ignored the clamor of the crowd”) [Middle English clamour, from Old French, from Latin clamor, shout, from clamare, to cry out.]

classification (klas-fi-kashn) n. 1. The act or result of classifying. 2. A category or class. 3. Biology. The systematic grouping of organisms into categories on the basis of evolutionary or structural relationships between them; taxonomy. The act of arranging or the way something is arranged : organization, categorization, systemization, arrangement, cataloguing, classification, disposal, distribution, formation, grouping, layout, ordering, placement, sequence, structure. Antonyms: disorganization, disarrangement. The separation of a whole into its parts for study: dissection, itemization, analysis, breakdown, classification, detailing, fractionation, resolution (technical).

coerce tr.v. coerced coercing coerces 1. To force to act or think in a given manner by pressure, threats, or intimidation; compel. 2. To dominate, restrain, or control forcibly: coerced the strikers into compliance. 3. To bring about by force: efforts to coerce agreement. [Lat. coercere, to confine : co(m)-, together + arcere, to restrain.] coercer n. coercible adj. coercion n. 1. The act or practice of coercing. 2. The power to coerce. coercionary adj. coercive adj. Characterized by or inclined to coercion. coercively adv. coerciveness n.

coeternal adj. Equally or jointly eternal. "Hail, holy Light, offspring of Heaven first born! Or of the Eternal coeternal beam." – Milton.

coexistent adj. Existing at the same time. existent 1. Having life or being; existing. 2. Occurring or present at the moment; current. n. One that exists. Having existence or life. alive, existent, extant, living. Antonyms: dead, extinct.

cognizant adj. Fully informed; conscious, aware. Having knowledge or understanding; “our youth are cognizant of the law;” “I am well aware of his limitations” [syn: cognisant, well aware, aware] [ant: incognizant]

cohere v. cohered, cohering, coheres v.intr. 1. To stick or hold together in a mass that resists separation. 2. To have internal elements or parts logically connected so that aesthetic consistency results: “The movie as a whole failed to cohere” (Robert Brustein). v.tr. To cause to form a united, orderly, and aesthetically consistent whole. [Latin cohaerre : co-, co- + haerre, to cling.]
coherence n. 1: the state of cohering or sticking together [syn: coherency, cohesion, cohesiveness] [ant: incoherence] 2: logical and orderly and consistent relation of parts [syn: coherency] Coherence of discourse, and a direct tendency of all the parts of it to the argument in hand, are most eminently to be found in him. – Locke.

cohesiveness n. Holding the particles of a homogeneous body together; as, cohesive attraction; producing cohesion; as, a cohesive force. Cohering, or sticking together, as in a mass; capable of cohering; tending to cohere; as, cohesive clay.

commune intr.v. communed, communing, communes 1. To be in a state of intimate, heightened sensitivity and receptivity, as with one's surroundings: hikers communing with nature. [Middle English comunen, to have common dealings with, converse, from Old French communer, to make common, share (from commun, common.), and perhaps from Old French communier, to share in the Communion (from Late Latin commnicre, from Latin, to communicate.]

communion n. 1. The act or an instance of sharing, as of thoughts or feelings; intercourse between two or more persons; esp., intimate association and intercourse implying sympathy and confidence; interchange of thoughts, purposes, etc.; agreement; fellowship; as, the communion of saints. 2. Religious or spiritual fellowship. 3. A body of Christians with a common religious faith who practice the same rites; a denomination. [Middle English communioun, Christian fellowship, Eucharist, from Old French communion, from Late Latin commni, commnin-, from Latin, mutual participation, from commnis, common.] In Bible: (fellowship with God) (Gen. 18:17-33; Ex. 33:9-11; Num. 12:7, 8), between Christ and his people (John 14:23), by the Spirit (2 Cor. 13:14; Phil. 2:1), of believers with one another (Eph. 4:1-6). The Lord's Supper is so called (1 Cor. 10:16, 17), because in it there is fellowship between Christ and his disciples, and of the disciples with one another.

comparable adj 1: able to be compared or worthy of comparison [ant: incomparable] 2: conforming in every respect; “boxes with corresponding dimensions”; “the like period of the preceding year” [syn: corresponding, like]

compel tr.v. -pelled -pelling -pels 1. To force, drive, or constrain: Duty compelled him to volunteer. 2. To necessitate or pressure by force; exact: The energy crisis compels fuel conservation. [ME compellen < Lat. compellere : com-, together + pellere, to drive.] compellable adj. compellably adv. compeller n. compellingly adv. Urgently requiring attention.

compensate v. To serve as or provide a substitute or counterbalance; adjust or make up for; “engineers will work to correct the effects or air resistance” To make amends; to supply an equivalent; – followed by for; as, nothing can compensate for the loss of reputation. To offset. To make satisfactory payment or reparation to; recompense or reimburse: Management compensated us for the time we worked. “She was compensated for the loss of her arm in the accident” [syn: recompense, repair, indemnify] 3: make up for shortcomings or a feeling of inferiority by exaggerating good qualities; “he is compensating for being a bad father” [syn: cover, overcompensate] 4: make reparations or amends for; “right a wrongs done to the victims of the Holocaust” [syn: right, redress, correct] [ant: wrong] 5: do or give something to somebody in return; “Does she compensate you for the work you are doing?” [syn: pay, pay off, make up] compensatory adj. countervailing, offsetting, compensative – (compensating for)

competent adj. Answering to all requirements; adequate; sufficient; suitable; capable; fit. Properly or sufficiently qualified; capable: a competent typist. Adequate for the purpose: a competent performance. “That is the privilege of the infinite Author of things, . . . but is not competent to any finite being.” – Locke. (Law) Legally qualified or fit to perform an act; properly or sufficiently qualified; capable; answering to all requirements; adequate; sufficient; suitable; fit. “A competent knowledge of the world.” “Competent age.” “Competent statesmen.” “A competent witness.”

complement n. 1. a. Something that completes, makes up a whole, or brings to perfection. b. The quantity or number needed to make up a whole: shelves with a full complement of books. 3. Either of two parts that complete the whole or mutually complete each other. [Usage Note: Complement and compliment, though quite distinct in meaning, are sometimes confused because they are pronounced the same. As a noun, complement means “something that completes or brings to perfection” (The antique silver was a complement to the beautifully set table); used as a verb it means “to serve as a complement to.” The noun compliment means “an expression or act of courtesy or praise” (They gave us a compliment on our beautifully set table), while the verb means “to pay a compliment to.”]

complemental adj : acting as or providing a complement (something that completes the whole). Supplying, or tending to supply, a deficiency; fully completing.

complied with intr.v. complied, complying, complies 1. To act in accordance with another's command, request, rule, or wish: The patient complied with the physician's orders. 2. Obsolete. To be courteous or obedient. Comply v.i. 1. To yield assent; to accord; agree, or acquiesce; to adapt one's self; to consent or conform; – usually followed by with. Yet this be sure, in nothing to comply, Scandalous or forbidden in our law. – Milton. He that complies against his will Is of his own opinion still. – Hudibras. [Perh. formed fr. compliment, influenced by ply, pliant, which are of different origin: cf. It. complire to compliment, finish, suit.]

component n. 1. A constituent element, as of a system; element. 2. A part of a mechanical or electrical complex. adj. Being or functioning as a constituent or an ingredient. Serving, or helping, to form; composing; constituting; constituent. The component parts of natural bodies. – Sir I. Newton.

composite adj. a structure or an entity made up of distinct components; compound. A complex material, such as wood or fiberglass, in which two or more distinct, structurally complementary substances, especially metals, ceramics, glasses, and polymers, combine to produce structural or functional properties not present in any individual component.

comprehend tr.v. -hended -hending -hends 1. To grasp mentally; understand or know. 2. To take in, include, or embrace; comprise: Greater Boston comprehends the surrounding suburbs. [ME comprehenden < Lat. comprehendere : com-, together + prehendere, to grasp.] comprehendible adj.

comprehensible adj. comprehensible (vs. incomprehensible): Readily comprehended or understood; intelligible; comprehendible – (capable of being comprehended or understood; “an idea comprehensible to the average mind”)

comprehension n. The capacity of the mind to perceive and understand; the power, act, or process of grasping with the intellect; perception; understanding; as, a comprehension of abstract principles. The act or fact of grasping the meaning, nature, or importance of; understanding. The knowledge that is acquired in this way.

concept n. 1. An abstract general conception; a notion; a universal. A general idea derived or inferred from specific instances or occurrences. Something formed in the mind; a thought or notion. A general idea or understanding, esp. one derived from specific instances or occurrences. 2. Something conceived in the mind; an abstract or generic idea generalized from particular instances. A thought or notion. Concept is frequently used as a synonym for conception or idea. Traditionally, concept is used for a general abstract idea: The concept of democracy (meaning “the general idea of a democratic state”) began with the Greeks. Conception is used to refer to a particular mental picture or understanding of a concept: Our conception of democracy (meaning “our particular understanding of what democracy is”) is quite different from the Greeks. [LLat. conceptus < p.part. of concipere, to conceive.]

conceptual adj. An abstract idea or notion; something conceived in the mind; a general idea inferred or derived from specific instances. 1. Of or relating to concepts or mental conception: conceptual discussions that antedated development of the new product. 2. Of or relating to conceptualism. concept n. 1. A general idea derived or inferred from specific instances or occurrences. 2. Something formed in the mind; a thought or notion; idea.

conclaves n. 1. A secret or confidential meeting. A private meeting; a close or secret assembly. 2. A meeting of family members or associates. [Middle English, private chamber, conclave of cardinals, from Latin conclave, lockable room : com-, com- + clavis, key.]

concurrently adv. With concurrence; unitedly; overlapping in duration; “concurrently with the conference an exhibition of things associated with Rutherford was held”; “going to school and holding a job at the same time” [syn: at the same time] concurrent adj. 1. Happening at the same time as something else; contemporary. 2. Operating or acting in conjunction with another. 3. Meeting or tending to meet at the same point; convergent. 4. Being in accordance; harmonious.

condescension n. Patronizingly superior behavior or attitude; the trait of displaying arrogance by patronizing those considered inferior [syn: superciliousness, disdainfulness] 2: a communication that indicates lack of respect by patronizing the recipient [syn: disdain, patronage] 3: affability to your inferiors and temporary disregard for differences of position or rank; “the queen”s condescension was intended to make us feel comfortable” [syn: condescendingness] Syn: Complaisance; courtesy; affability.

conduct v. 1. To direct the course of; manage or control. 2. To lead or guide; accompany. To lead, as a commander; to direct; to manage; to carry on; as, to conduct the affairs of a kingdom. Little skilled in the art of conducting a siege. – Prescott. 3. Music. To lead (an orchestra, for example). 4. To serve as a medium for conveying; transmit: Some metals conduct heat. 5. To comport (oneself) in a specified way: She conducted herself stoically in her time of grief.

conformity n. pl. conformities 1. Similarity in form or character; agreement: I acted in conformity with my principles. 2. Action or behavior in correspondence with socially accepted standards, conventions, rules, or laws: conformity to university regulations. 3. Geology. The relationship between adjacent layers of sedimentary rock.

conjecture n. 1. Inference based on inconclusive or incomplete evidence. 2. A statement, opinion, or conclusion based on inference. -v.-tured -turing -tures -tr. To infer from inconclusive evidence; guess. -intr. To make a conjecture; to arrive at by conjecture; to infer on slight evidence; to surmise; to guess; to form, at random, opinions concerning: The commentators made various conjectures about the outcome of the next election. [ME < Lat. conjectura < conicere, to infer : com-, together + jacere, to throw.]
conjectured adj. Synonyms: conjecture surmise guess speculate presume infer: These verbs mean to reach a conclusion or judgment. Conjecture implies that a conclusion is based on incomplete evidence. Surmise suggests a conclusion reached by intuition or by interpretation of slender evidence. Guess, in formal usage, implies a haphazard attempt to answer or solve a problem and suggests substantial grounds for doubt. Informally the term implies a tentative conclusion reached in the absence of alternatives: I guess I'll go to the movies. Speculate implies an orderly process of reasoning based on inconclusive evidence, and is often interchangeable with conjecture and infer apply to conclusions about which less doubt is implied. Presume involves taking a conclusion for granted. In careful usage it is limited to what is considered worthy of trust; thus the term implies assumption based on experience or knowledge. Infer involves reaching a conclusion by reasoning from evidence about which no doubt is necessarily suggested.

conjoint adj. 1. Joined together; united. 2. Of, pertaining to, consisting of, or carried on by two or more joined or associated persons or things. [ME < OFr., p.part. of conjoindre, to conjoin.] conjointly adv.

conjunction n. 1. The act of conjoining, or the state of being conjoined, united, or associated; union; association; league. The temporal property of two things happening at the same time; “the interval determining the coincidence gate is adjustable” [syn: concurrence, coincidence, co-occurrence] 2: the state of being joined together [syn: junction, conjugation, colligation] 3: an uninflected function word that serves to conjoin words or phrases or clauses or sentences [syn: conjunctive, connective] 4: the grammatical relation between linguistic units (words or phrases or clauses) that are connected by a conjunction 5: (astronomy) apparent meeting or passing of two or more celestial bodies in the same degree of the zodiac [syn: alignment] 6: something that joins or connects [syn: junction]

conscious adj. 1. a. Having an awareness of one's own existence, sensations, and thoughts and of one's environment: injured but conscious. b. Capable of thought, will, or perception: Man is a conscious being. 2. Subjectively known or felt: conscious remorse. 3. Intentionally conceived or done; deliberate: a conscious insult; made a conscious effort to speak clearly. 4. Having or showing self-consciousness; aware: conscious of his shortcomings. -n. Psychoanalysis. The component of waking awareness perceptible by an individual at any given instant; consciousness. [Lat. conscius, knowing with others : com-, together + scire, to know.] consciously adv.

consciousness n. 1. The state or condition of being conscious. 2. The essence or totality of attitudes, opinions, and sensitivities held or thought to be held by an individual or group: national consciousness. 3. A critical awareness of one's own identity and situation. Awareness; concern.

consecration n. The act, process, or ceremony of consecrating. A solemn commitment of your life or your time to some cherished purpose (to a service or a goal); “his consecration to study”) (Religion) To declare or set apart as sacred; sanctification of something by setting it apart (usually with religious rites) as dedicated to God; “the Cardinal attended the consecration of the church” 3. To dedicate to a given goal or service: consecrated his life to helping the poor. 4. To make venerable: a tradition consecrated by time. -adj. Consecrated to a sacred purpose; sanctified. [ME consecraten < Lat. consecrare : com-(intensive) + sacrare, to make sacred < sacer, sacred.] consecrative adj.

consequence (konsi-kwens, -kwns) n. 1. Something that logically or naturally follows from an action or condition. See Synonyms at effect. 2. The relation of a result to its cause. 3. A logical conclusion or inference. 4. Importance in rank or position: scientists of consequence. 5. Significance; importance: an issue of consequence. As a result; consequently. The quality or state of being important: importance, account, concern, consequence, moment, significance, weight. Antonyms: unimportance, insignificance. A measure of desirability or importance : worth, account, valuation, usefulness, benefit, merit, worthiness, importance, use, consequence. Antonyms: uselessness, fruitlessness, worthlessness, inutility. An action or state brought about by a cause : result, aftereffect, aftermath, consequence, fallout, effect, event, eventuality, issue, outcome, precipitate, sequel, sequence, upshot. The condition or quality of being serious and impressive : importance, consequence, grandeur, gravity, impressiveness, momentousness, solemnity, weightiness, import, weight, seriousness. Antonyms: unimportance, insignificance, triviality.

consistent (kn-sistnt) adj. 1. In agreement; compatible: The testimony was consistent with the known facts. 2. Being in agreement with itself; coherent and uniform: a consistent pattern of behavior. 3. Reliable; steady: demonstrated a consistent ability to impress the critics. 4. Mathematics. Having at least one common solution, as of two or more equations or inequalities. [Latin consistens, consistent-, present participle of consistere, to stand still. CONSIST.] --con-sis'tent-ly adv. Being in agreement or harmony. adj. concordant, compatible, congruous, harmonious, consonant, like-minded, accordant, consistent, congenial, correspondent, in accord, in accordance, in conformity, in harmony, in keeping, in line, in step, of a piece, of one mind. Antonyms: discordant, unharmonious, incompatible, different. Adhering firmly to a particular habit or behavior. adj. habitual, chronic, confirmed, inveterate, unchanging, constant, consistent. Antonyms: changing, inconsistent, inconstant, moody, changeable.

consonance n. 1. Harmoniousness – (the property of sounding harmonious) Agreement; harmony; accord. 2. Close correspondence of sounds. The repetition of consonants or of a consonant pattern, especially at the ends of words, as in blank and think or strong and string. 3. Music. A simultaneous combination of sounds conventionally regarded as pleasing and final in effect.

conspiracies n. A combination of men for an evil purpose; an agreement, between two or more persons, to commit a crime in concert, as treason; a plot. They made a conspiracy against [Amaziah]. (2 Kings xiv.19). An agreement to perform together an illegal, wrongful, or subversive act. A group of conspirators. Law. An agreement between two or more persons to commit a crime or accomplish a legal purpose through illegal action. A joining or acting together, as if by sinister design: a conspiracy of wind and tide that devastated coastal areas.

constellation n. 1. Astronomy. a. Any of 88 stellar groups considered to resemble and named after various mythological characters, inanimate objects, and animals. b. An area of the celestial sphere occupied by such a group. 2. Astrol. The position of the stars at the time of one's birth, regarded by astrologers as determining one's character or fate. 3. A gathering or assemblage of similar or related persons or things. 4. A set or configuration of objects, properties, or individuals, esp. a structurally or systematically related grouping. [ME constellacioun < OFr. constellation < LLat. constellatio : com-, together + stella, star.] constellational adj. constellatory adj.

constitute tr.v. -tuted -tuting -tutes 1. To be the elements or parts of; compose: Ten members constitute a quorum. To form the substance or whole of: “the bonds constituted the entire estate” 2. To amount to; equal: “Rabies is transmitted through a bite... patting a rabid animal in itself does not constitute exposure” 3. To set up or establish according to law or provision: a body that is duly constituted under the charter. 4. To found (an institution, for example). 5. To enact (a law or regulation). 6. To appoint to an office, dignity, function, or task; designate. “those who are constituted heirs or named legatees” [Lat. constituere, constitut-, to set up : com- (intensive) + statuere, to set up.] constitutor n.

constituent (kn-stichoo-nt) adj. 1. Serving as part of a whole; component: a constituent element. 2. Empowered to elect or designate. 3. Authorized to make or amend a constitution: a constituent assembly. n. 1. A constituent part; a component. See Synonyms at element. 2. A resident of a district or member of a group represented by an elected official. 3. One that authorizes another to act as a representative; a client. 4. Grammar. One of two or more elements into which a construction or compound may be divided by analysis, being either immediate, as He/ works on the railroad, or ultimate, as He/ work/s/ on/ the/ rail/road. [Latin constituens, constituent-, present participle of constituere, to set up. See CONSTITUTE., N., from French, from Latin constituens.] --con-stit'u-ent-ly adv. An individual item, fact, or detail : particular, component, constituent, element, facet, factor, feature, ingredient, minutia, nicety, point, specific. Constructed or serving as part of a whole. adj. constituent, built-in, component, componential, partial, incorporate.

consummate v.tr. con-sum-mat-ed, con-sum-mat-ing, con-sum-mates. 1. To bring to completion or fruition; conclude: consummate a business transaction. To realize or achieve; fulfill: a dream that was finally consummated with the publication of her first book. 2. To complete (a marriage) with the first act of sexual intercourse after the ceremony. To fulfill (a sexual desire or attraction) especially by intercourse. adj. 1. Complete or perfect in every respect: consummate happiness. 2. Supremely accomplished or skilled: "Sargent was now a consummate master of brushwork" 3. Complete; utter: a consummate bore. (perfect; brought to perfection) [Middle English consummaten, from Latin consummare, consummat- : com-, com- + summa, sum.

contravention n. The act of contravening; opposition; obstruction; transgression; violation. Coming into conflict with [syn: dispute] Warrants in contravention of the acts of Parliament. – Macaulay. In contravention of all his marriage stipulations. – Motley.

controller n. 1. One who controls. 2. comptroller An officer who audits accounts and supervises the financial affairs of a corporation or of a governmental body. 3. A regulating mechanism, as in a vehicle or electric device. controllership n.

conversant adj. Familiar – (usually followed by “with”) well informed about or knowing thoroughly; “conversant with business trends”; “familiar with the complex machinery.” Familiar, as by study or experience: conversant with medieval history. [Middle English conversaunt, associated with, from Old French conversant, present participle of converser, to associate with, from Latin conversari.]

co-ordinate (ko-ordn-at, -it) n. 1. One that is equal in importance, rank, or degree. 2. coordinates. A set of articles, as of clothing or luggage, designed to match or complement one other, as in style or color. 3. Mathematics. Any of a set of two or more numbers used to determine the position of a point, line, curve, or plane in a space of a given dimension with respect to a system of lines or other fixed reference. adj. (-it, -at). 1. Of equal importance, rank, or degree: coordinate offices of a business. 2. Of or involving coordination. 3. Of or based on a system of coordinates. v. co-or-di-nat-ed, co-or-di-nat-ing, co-or-di-nates (-at). v. tr. 1. To place in the same order, class, or rank. 2. To harmonize in a common action or effort: coordinating the moving parts of a machine; coordinate the colors of a design. v. intr. 1. To be coordinate: The generators coordinate so that one is always running. 2. To work together harmoniously: a nursing staff that coordinates smoothly. 3. To form a pleasing combination; match: shoes that coordinate with the rest of the outfit. [CO- + ORDINATE.] --co-or'di-nate-ly (-it-le). adv. --co-or'di-nate-ness (-it-nis). n. --co-or'di-na'tive adj. --co-or'di-na'tor n. To plan and start to carry out. v. coordinate, organize, arrange, institute, launch, mount. To bring into a state of agreement or accord. v.reconcile, coordinate, resolve, harmonize, agree, clear up, mediate, concur, compromise, mend, negotiate, patch up, rectify, settle, smooth over, straighten out, work out. To combine and adapt in order to attain a particular effect. v. blend, harmonize, synthesize, arrange, incorporate, integrate, unify, coordinate, orchestrate. Antonyms: clash. To work together smoothly. v. coordinate, mesh. To make into a whole by joining a system of parts. v. synchronize, coordinate, concatenate, correlate, integrate, mesh, unite, unify. Antonyms: separate, divide. Shared equally by two or more. adj. common, coordinate, mutual, collaborative, collective, conjoint, correlative, joint, reciprocal. Antonyms: individual.

corporeality n. The quality of being physical; consisting of matter [syn: materiality, physicalness] [ant: immateriality] corporeal (kÔr-pÔr-l, -pr-) adj. 1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of the body; bodily. 2. Of a material nature; tangible. [From Latin corporeus, from corpus, corpor-, body. kwrep- Indo-European Roots.]

correlate (kor-lat, kor-)v. cor-re-lat-ed, cor-re-lat-ing, cor-re-lates.v. tr. 1. To put or bring into causal, complementary, parallel, or reciprocal relation. 2. To establish or demonstrate as having a correlation: correlated drug abuse and crime.v. intr. To be related by a correlation.adj. (-lit, -lat). Related by a correlation, especially having corresponding characteristics.n. (-lit, -lat). Either of two correlate entities; a correlative. To examine so as to note the similarities and differences of. v.compare, assess, collate, contrast, correlate, evaluate, juxtapose, oppose, rate, weigh, bracket, equate, measure against. To make into a whole by joining a system of parts. v.synchronize, coordinate, concatenate, correlate, integrate, mesh, unite, unify. Antonyms: separate, divide. [Back-formation from CORRELATION.] correlation (kor-lashn, kor-)n. 1. A causal, complementary, parallel, or reciprocal relationship, especially a structural, functional, or qualitative correspondence between two comparable entities: a correlation between drug abuse and crime. 2. Statistics. The simultaneous change in value of two numerically valued random variables: the positive correlation between cigarette smoking and the incidence of lung cancer; the negative correlation between age and normal vision. 3. An act of correlating or the condition of being correlated. [Medieval Latin correlatio, correlation- : Latin com-, com- + Latin relatio, relation, report (from relatus, past participle of referre, to carry back.)]

cosmic adj. 1. Of or pertaining to the universe, esp. as distinct from the earth. 2. Infinitely or inconceivably extended; vast: an issue of cosmic dimensions. [Gk. kosmikos < kosmos, universe.] cosmically adv.

cosmic sociology n. 1. cosmic adj. – (of or from or pertaining to or characteristic of the cosmos or universe; “cosmic laws”; “cosmic catastrophe”; “cosmic rays”) 2. cosmic – (inconceivably extended in space or time) + sociology n. (the study and classification of human societies)

counterpart n. 1. a. One that closely resembles another. b. One that has the same functions and characteristics as another; a corresponding person or thing: Their foreign minister is the counterpart of our secretary of state. 2. A copy or duplicate of a legal paper. 3. a. One of two parts that fit and complete each other. b. One that serves as a complement. 4. A thing may be applied to another thing so as to fit perfectly, as a seal to its impression; hence, a thing which is adapted to another thing, or which supplements it; that which serves to complete or complement anything; hence, a person or thing having qualities lacking in another; an opposite.

counterpoise n. an equivalent counterbalancing weight. A force or influence that balances or equally counteracts another; to act against with equal power; to balance. 2. An equal power or force acting in opposition; a force sufficient to balance another force. The second nobles are a counterpoise to the higher nobility, that they grow not too potent. – Bacon. 3. The state of being in equilibrium. To act against with equal weight; to equal in weight; to balance the weight of; to counterbalance; the relation of two weights or forces which balance each other; equilibrium; equiponderance. The pendulous round eart, with balanced air, In counterpoise. – Milton.

covenant n. 1. A binding agreement; a compact; an official agreement or bargain. 2. (Law) A formal sealed agreement or contract. 3. (Bible) God's promise to the human race. [Middle English, from Old French, from present participle of convenir, to agree.]

crave v. craved craving craves -tr. 1. To have an intense desire for. 2. To need urgently; require. 3. To beg earnestly for; implore. -intr. To have an eager or intense desire. [ME craven < OE crafian, to beg.] craver n. cravingly adv.

creator n. 1. One that creates. 2. Creator God. [ME createn < Lat. creare.] create tr.v. -ated -ating -ates 1. To cause to exist; bring into being. 2. To give rise to; produce: Her remark created a stir. 3. To invest with an office or title; appoint. 4. To produce through artistic or imaginative effort: create a poem; create a role. -adj. Archaic. Created. [ME createn < Lat. creare.] A person who creates, founds, or originates : inventor, architect, author, builder, creator, designer, founder, framer, mastermind, maker, originator, planner, prime mover, progenitor, artificer.

critical (kriti-kl) adj. 1. Inclined to judge severely and find fault. 2. Characterized by careful, exact evaluation and judgment: a critical reading. 3. Of, relating to, or characteristic of critics or criticism: critical acclaim; a critical analysis of Melville's writings. 4. Forming or having the nature of a turning point; crucial or decisive: a critical point in the campaign. 5. Of or relating to a medical crisis: an illness at the critical stage. Being or relating to a grave physical condition especially of a patient. 6. Indispensable; essential: a critical element of the plan; a second income that is critical to the family's well-being. 7. Being in or verging on a state of crisis or emergency: a critical shortage of food. 8. Fraught with danger or risk; perilous. 9. Mathematics. Of or relating to a point at which a curve has a maximum, minimum, or point of inflection. 10. Chemistry. Physics. Of or relating to the value of a measurement, such as temperature, at which an abrupt change in a quality, property, or state occurs: A critical temperature of water is 100 degrees C, its boiling point at standard atmospheric pressure. 11. Physics. Capable of sustaining a nuclear chain reaction.--crit'i-cal-ly adv. --crit'i-cal-ness n. SYNONYM: critical, captious, censorious, faultfinding, hypercritical. The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "tending or marked by a tendency to find and call attention to errors and flaws": a critical attitude; a captious pedant; censorious of petty failings; an excessively demanding and faultfinding tutor; hypercritical of colloquial speech. ANTONYM: uncritical Expressing reproach or blame. adj. reproachful, denunciatory, critical, accusatory, supercritical, scolding. Antonyms: praiseworthy, accepting. Inclined to judge severely and find fault. adj.critical, censorious, condemnatory, faultfinding, hypercritical. Antonyms: uncritical, nonjudgmental. Fraught with danger or harm. adj.grave, critical, hazardous, serious, dangerous, perilous, unsafe, precarious, risky. Antonyms: safe, secure, unhazardous. Requiring immediate attention or action. adj. urgent, compelling, critical, crucial, exigent, life-and-death, life-or-death, pressing, vital. Not to be dispensed with; essential. adj. indispensable, critical, crucial, integral, mandatory, necessary, pivotal, required, compulsory, requisite, vital, needed. Antonyms: dispensible, disposable, throwaway.

crystallized adj. 1. Having become fixed and definite in form; “distinguish between crystallized and uncrystallized opinion” To give a definite, precise, and usually permanent form to: The scientists finally crystallized their ideas about the role of the protein. 2. To coat with crystals, as of sugar.

culminates v.intr. culminated, culminating, culminates 1. 1. To reach the highest point or degree; climax: habitual antagonism that culminated in open hostility. 2. To come to completion; end: Years of waiting culminated in a tearful reunion. 2. Astronomy. To reach the highest point above an observer's horizon. Used of stars and other celestial bodies. v. tr. To bring to the point of greatest intensity or to completion; climax: The ceremony culminated a long week of preparation. [Late Latin culminre, culmint-, from Latin culmen, culmin-summit.]

curtailed v. 1. restrict, curtail, curb, cut back – (place restrictions on; “curtail drinking in school”) 2. clip, curtail, cut short – (terminate or abbreviate before its intended or proper end or its full extent; “My speech was cut short”; “Personal freedom is curtailed in many countries”)
curtailment n. 1: the temporal property of being cut short; the act or result of curtailing or cutting off. curtail v. To cut short or reduce.

custodian n. One that has charge of something; a caretaker. An organization, typically a commercial bank, that holds in custody and safekeeping someone else”s assets. These assets may be cash, securities, or virtually anything of value.

cycle n. 1. An interval of time during which a characteristic, often regularly repeated event or sequence of events occurs; a recurring series of events: as a series of stages through which an organism tends to pass once in a fixed order: the common cycle of birth, growth, senescence and death. 2. A single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon; one complete performance of a vibration, electric oscillation, current alternation, or other periodic process 3. A periodically repeated sequence of events; a series of stages through which a substance tends to pass and which usually leads back to the starting point.

dedication (n.) The act of setting apart or consecrating to a divine Being, or to a sacred use, often with religious solemnities; solemn appropriation; as, the dedication of Solomon's temple. Dedication (n.) A devoting or setting aside for any particular purpose; as, a dedication of lands to public use. Dedication (n.) An address to a patron or friend, prefixed to a book, testifying respect, and often recommending the work to his special protection and favor. Dedicate (p. a.) Dedicated; set apart; devoted; consecrated. Dedicated (imp. & p. p.) of Dedicate Dedicating (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Dedicate Dedicate (v. t.) To set apart and consecrate, as to a divinity, or for sacred uses; to devote formally and solemnly; as, to dedicate vessels, treasures, a temple, or a church, to a religious use. Dedicate (v. t.) To devote, set apart, or give up, as one's self, to a duty or service. Dedicate (v. t.) To inscribe or address, as to a patron. Dedicatee (n.) One to whom a thing is dedicated; -- correlative to dedicator.

deduction n. Act or process of deducing or inferring. Act of deducting or taking away; subtraction; as, the deduction of the subtrahend from the minuend. That which is deduced or drawn from premises by a process of reasoning; an inference; a conclusion. That which is deducted; the part taken away; abatement; as, a deduction from the yearly rent.

deductive a. Of or pertaining to deduction; capable of being deduced from premises; deducible.
 
deductively adv. By deduction; by way of inference; by consequence.

deduct (v. t.) To lead forth or out. To take away, separate, or remove, in numbering, estimating, or calculating; to subtract; – often with from or out of. To reduce; to diminish.

deductible (a.) Capable of being deducted, taken away, or withdrawn.

default n. 1. default – (loss due to not showing up; “he lost the game by default”) 2. default, nonpayment, nonremittal – (act of failing to meet a financial obligation) 3. nonpayment, default, nonremittal – (loss resulting from failure of a debt to be paid) 4. default option, default – (an option that is selected automatically unless an alternative is specified)

default v. To fail in fulfilling a contract, agreement, or duty; to fail to perform or pay; to be guilty of neglect of; to omit. What they have defaulted towards him as no king. – Milton. That he gainst courtesy so foully did default. – Spenser. 1. Failure to perform a task or fulfill an obligation, especially failure to meet a financial obligation: in default on a loan. 2. Law. Failure to make a required court appearance. 3. The failure of one or more competitors or teams to participate in a contest: won the championship by default. v. de-fault-ed, de-fault-ing, de-faults.v. intr. 1. To fail to do what is required. To fail to pay money when it is due. 2. Law. To fail to appear in court when summoned. To lose a case by not appearing. 3. To fail to take part in or complete a scheduled contest. v.tr. 1. To fail to perform or pay. 2. Law. To lose (a case) by failing to appear in court. 3. To fail to take part in or complete (a contest, for example). --idiom. in default of. Through the failure, absence, or lack of. [Middle English defaute, from Old French, from past participle of defaillir, to fail, grow weak : de-, intensive pref. See DE- + faillir. See fail.]

delegates v. To transfer responsibility or authority; to authorize and send (another person) as one's representative. To commit or entrust to another: delegate a task to a subordinate. to entrust or transfer (as power, authority, or responsibility) to another: as a : to transfer (one's contractual duties) to another; to appoint as one's representative b : to empower a body (as an administrative agency) to perform (a governmental function)

delegations (deli-gashn) n.pl. 1. The act of delegating. The condition of being delegated. 2. A person or group of persons officially elected or appointed to represent another or others. A group of diplomats sent to negotiate with a foreign government : delegation, embassy, deputation, legation, mission. del-e-gate (deli-gat, -git) n. 1. A person authorized to act as representative for another; a deputy or an agent. 2. A representative to a conference or convention. 3. A member of a House of Delegates, the lower house of the Maryland, Virginia, or West Virginia legislature. 4. An elected or appointed representative of a U.S. territory in the House of Representatives who is entitled to speak but not vote. v. tr. del-e-gat-ed, del-e-gat-ing, del-e-gates (-gat). 1. To authorize and send (another person) as one's representative. 2. To commit or entrust to another: delegate a task to a subordinate. 3. Law. To appoint (one's debtor) as a debtor to one's creditor in place of oneself. [Middle English delegat, from Medieval Latin delegatus, from past participle of delegare, to dispatch : de-, de- + legare, to send.] --del'e-ga'tor n. A person who acts for another : representative, ambassador, envoy, agent, delegate, deputy, emissary, procurator, proxy, substitute, proctor, surrogate, spokesperson. To authorize and send (a person) as one's representative. v.delegate, name, designate, appoint as one's representative.

deliberations n. The act or process of deliberating; a discussion and consideration by a group of persons (as a jury or legislature) of the reasons for or against a measure. Discussion and consideration of all sides of an issue: the deliberations of a jury. The act of deliberating, or of weighing and examining the reasons for and against a choice or measure; careful consideration; mature reflection. Choosing the fairest way with a calm deliberation. – W. Montagu. Careful discussion and examination of the reasons for and against a measure; as, the deliberations of a legislative body or council. Thoughtfulness in decision or action.

demonstrate (v.t.) To point out; to show; to exhibit; to make evident. (v.t.) To show, or make evident, by reasoning or proof; to prove by deduction; to establish so as to exclude the possibility of doubt or denial. (v.t.) To exhibit and explain (a dissection or other anatomical preparation). demonstration (n.) The act of demonstrating; an exhibition; proof; especially, proof beyond the possibility of doubt; indubitable evidence, to the senses or reason. (n.) An expression, as of the feelings, by outward signs; a manifestation; a show. (n.) The exhibition and explanation of a dissection or other anatomical preparation. (n.) (Military) a decisive exhibition of force, or a movement indicating an attack. (n.) The act of proving by the syllogistic process, or the proof itself. (n.) A course of reasoning showing that a certain result is a necessary consequence of assumed premises -- these premises being definitions, axioms, and previously established propositions.

denote v. To mark out plainly; to signify by a visible sign; to serve as the sign or name of; to indicate; to point out; as, the hands of the clock denote the hour. A frown that denoted increasing impatience. 2. To serve as a symbol or name for the meaning of; signify: A flashing yellow light denotes caution. 3. To signify directly; refer to specifically.

deprivation n. 1. privation, want, deprivation – (a state of extreme poverty) 2. loss, deprivation – (the disadvantage that results from losing something; “his loss of credibility led to his resignation”; “losing him is no great deprivation”) 3. privation, deprivation – (act of depriving someone of food or money or rights; “nutritional privation”; “deprivation of civil rights”)

derivations n. 1. The act or process of deriving. 2. The state or fact of being derived; originating: a custom of recent derivation. 3. Something derived; a derivative. 4. The form or source from which something is derived; an origin. 5. The historical origin and development of a word; an etymology.

designate (v.t.) 1. To mark out and make known; to point out; to name; to indicate; to show; to distinguish by marks or description; to specify; as, to designate the boundaries of a country; to designate the rioters who are to be arrested. 2. To call by a distinctive title; to name. 3. To indicate or set apart for a purpose or duty; – with to or for; to designate an officer for or to the command of a post or station. Syn: To name; denominate; style; entitle; characterize; describe. Designated; appointed; chosen, name.

despair v. 1. To lose all hope: despaired of reaching shore safely. To give up as beyond hope or expectation. 2. To be overcome by a sense of futility or defeat. To be hopeless; to have no hope; to give up all hope or expectation; – often with of. We despaired even of life. – (2 Cor. i. 8.) Never despair of God's blessings here. – Wake.

despicable adj. 1. contemptible – (worthy only of being despised and rejected; “a contemptible lack of courage”; “A little, wretched, despicable creature, a worm, a mere nothing...that has risen up in contempt against the majesty of Heaven and earth”- Jonathan Edwards) 2. ugly, vile, unworthy – (morally reprehensible; “would do something as despicable as murder”; “ugly crimes”; “the vile development of slavery appalled them”)

destiny n.1. The inevitable or necessary fate to which a particular person or thing is destined; one's lot; fate. 2. A predetermined course of events considered as something beyond human power or control: "Marriage and hanging go by destiny" (Robert Burton). 3. The power or agency thought to predetermine events; fate: Destiny brought them together. [Middle English destine, from Old French destinee, from feminine past participle of destiner, to destine].

detained v. To keep back or from; to withhold. 2. To restrain from proceeding; to stay or stop; to delay; as, we were detained by an accident.

devising v. To form in the mind by new combinations of ideas, new applications of principles, or new arrangement of parts; to formulate by thought; to contrive; to excogitate; to invent; to plan; to scheme; as, to devise an engine, a new mode of writing, a plan of defense, or an argument. To devise curious works. – Ex. CCTV. 32. Devising schemes to realize his ambitious views. – Bancroft. 2. To plan or scheme for; to purpose to obtain. For wisdom is most riches; fools therefore They are which fortunes do by vows devise. – Spenser. 3. To say; to relate; to describe. [Obs.] – Chaucer. 4. To imagine; to guess. [Obs.] 5. (Law) To give (property) by will; used of real estate; formerly, also, of chattels. Syn: To bequeath; invent; discover; contrive; excogitate; imagine; plan; scheme. (Etymology: Anglo-French deviser to divide, share, bequeath, ultimately from Latin dividere to divide).

devolves v. 1. To pass on or delegate to another: The senator devolved the duties of office upon a group of aides. 2. Archaic. To cause to roll onward or downward. v.intr. 1. To be passed on or transferred to another: The burden of proof devolved upon the defendant. The estate devolved to an unlikely heir. 2. To degenerate or deteriorate gradually: After several hours the discussion had devolved into a shouting match. [Middle English devolven, to transfer, from Old French devolver, to confer, ascribe, from Latin devolvere, to roll down, fall to : de-, de- + volvere, to roll.]

differential n. (a quality that differentiates between similar things) differential gear, differential – (a bevel gear that permits rotation of two shafts at different speeds; used on the rear axle of automobiles to allow wheels to rotate at different speeds on curves) adj. 1. Of, relating to, or showing a difference. 2. Constituting or making a difference; distinctive. 3. Dependent on or making use of a specific difference or distinction. 4. Mathematics. Of or relating to differentiation. 5. Involving differences in speed or direction of motion.n. 1. Mathematics. An infinitesimal increment in a variable. The product of the derivative of a function containing one variable multiplied by the increment of the independent variable. 2. Differential gear. 3. A difference in wage rate or in price.

differentiation n. To become distinct or specialized; acquire a different character. To make distinctions; discriminate. The acquisition or possession of a character or function different from that of the original type. differentiate v. To constitute the distinction between: subspecies that are differentiated by the markings on their wings. To perceive or show the difference in or between; discriminate. To make different by alteration or modification.

diffused adj. Widely spread or scattered; not concentrated. To pour out and cause to spread, as a fluid; to cause to flow on all sides; to send out, or extend, in all directions; to spread; to circulate; to disseminate; to scatter; as to diffuse information. Thence diffuse His good to worlds and ages infinite. – Milton. We find this knowledge diffused among all civilized nations. – Whewell. Syn: To expand; spread; circulate; extend; scatter; disperse; publish; proclaim. Spread abroad; dispersed; loose; flowing. (of light rays) subjected to scattering by reflection from a rough surface or transmission through a translucent material; “diffused light” (of light) not bright or glaring; “a softer diffused radiance” [syn: softened]

dignity (digni-te) n.pl. dig-ni-ties. 1. The quality or state of being worthy of esteem or respect. 2. Inherent nobility and worth: the dignity of honest labor. 3. Poise and self-respect. Stateliness and formality in manner and appearance. 4. The respect and honor associated with an important position. 5. A high office or rank. 6. dignities. The ceremonial symbols and observances attached to high office. 7. Archaic. A dignitary. [Middle English dignite, from Old French, from Latin dignitas, from dignus, worthy.] A sense of one's own dignity or worth : pride, honor, amour-propre, ego, assertiveness, self-confidence, self-esteem, dignity, self-respect. Conformity to social conventions or standards : propriety, conventionality, correctness, decorum, punctilio, punctiliousness, seemliness, courtesy, decorousness, dignity, etiquette, formality, respectability.

diminishing adj. 1. To make smaller in any manner; to reduce in bulk or amount; to lessen; – opposed to augment or increase. Not diminish, but rather increase, the debt. 2. To lessen the authority or dignity of; to put down; to degrade; to abase; to weaken. I will diminish them, that they shall no more rule over the nations. – Ezek. xxix. 15. O thou . . . at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminished heads. – Milton. 3. (Mus.) To make smaller by a half step; to make (an interval) less than minor; as, a diminished seventh. 4. To take away; to subtract. Neither shall ye diminish aught from it.– Deut. iv.2.

diminution n. Change toward something smaller or lower; the act, process, or an instance of making less. 1. The act or process of diminishing; a lessening or reduction. The act of diminishing, or of making or becoming less; state of being diminished; reduction in size, quantity, or degree; – opposed to augmentation or increase. 2. The act of lessening dignity or consideration, or the state of being deprived of dignity; a lowering in estimation; degradation; abasement. 3. The resulting reduction; decrease.

discern v. discerned, discerning, discerns v.tr. To see and identify by noting a difference or differences; to note the distinctive character of; to discriminate; to distinguish. To perceive with the eyes or intellect; detect. To recognize or comprehend mentally. To perceive or recognize as being different or distinct; distinguish. To perceive differences. To see or understand the difference; to make distinction; as, to discern between good and evil, truth and falsehood. More than sixscore thousand that cannot discern between their right hand their left. – Jonah iv. 11. Detect with the senses; “The fleeing convicts were discerned in the darkness by the watchful prison guards”; “I can't discern the faces in this photograph” “To discern such buds as are fit to produce blossoms.” To see by the eye or by the understanding; to perceive and recognize; as, to discern a difference. And [I] beheld among the simple ones, I discerned among the youths, a young man void of understanding. – Prov. vii. 7. I wake, and I discern the truth. – Tennyson. Syn: To perceive; distinguish; discover; penetrate; discriminate; espy; descry; detect; recognize, pick out, make out, tell apart] [Middle English discernen, from Old French discerner, from Latin discernere, to separate : dis-, apart; see dis- + cernere, to perceive] discernment n.

discernible adj. Perceptible, as by the faculty of vision or the intellect. Capable of being discerned by the eye or the understanding; as, a star is discernible by the eye; the identity of difference of ideas is discernible by the understanding; “things happen in the earth and sky with no discernible cause”; “the newspaper reports no discernible progress in the negotiations”; “the skyline is easily discernible even at a distance of several miles” [ant: indiscernible] 2: capable of being perceived clearly; “an essay with a meaning that was not always discernible” 3: capable of being seen or noticed; “a discernible change in attitude”; “a clearly evident erasure in the manuscript”; “an observable change in behavior” [syn: evident, observable] Capable of being discerned by the eye or the understanding; as, a star is discernible by the eye; the identity of difference of ideas is discernible by the understanding. The effect of the privations and sufferings... was discernible to the last in his temper and deportment. – Macaulay. Syn: Perceptible; distinguishable; apparent; visible; evident; manifest. [L. discernibilis.] [Middle English discernen, from Old French discerner, from Latin discernere, to separate : dis-, apart; see dis- + cernere, to perceive]

discernibly adv. Perceptible, as by the faculty of vision or the intellect.

discernment n. 1. The act or process of exhibiting keen insight and good judgment. The cognitive condition of someone who understands; “he has virtually no understanding of social cause and effect” [syn: understanding, apprehension, savvy] 2. Keenness of insight and judgment. Delicate discrimination (especially of aesthetic values); “arrogance and lack of taste contributed to his rapid success”; “to ask at that particular time was the ultimate in bad taste” [syn: taste, appreciation, perceptiveness] 3: perception of that which is obscure [syn: perceptiveness] 4: ability to make good judgments [syn: sagacity, sagaciousness, judgment, judgement] 5: the trait of judging wisely and objectively; “a man of discernment” [syn: discretion] The power or faculty of the mind by which it distinguishes one thing from another; power of viewing differences in objects, and their relations and tendencies; penetrative and discriminate mental vision; acuteness; sagacity; insight; as, the errors of youth often proceed from the want of discernment. Syn: Judgment; acuteness; discrimination; penetration; sagacity; insight. – Discernment, Penetration, Discrimination. Discernment is keenness and accuracy of mental vision; penetration is the power of seeing deeply into a subject in spite of everything that intercepts the view; discrimination is a capacity of tracing out minute distinctions and the nicest shades of thought. A discerning man is not easily misled; one of a penetrating mind sees a multitude of things which escape others; a discriminating judgment detects the slightest differences. [Middle English discernen, from Old French discerner, from Latin discernere, to separate : dis-, apart; see dis- + cernere, to perceive]

disclose v. 1. To expose to view, as by removing a cover; uncover. 2. To make known (something heretofore kept secret). To lay open or expose to view; to cause to appear; to bring to light; to reveal. How softly on the Spanish shore she plays, Disclosing rock, and slope, and forest brown! – Byron. Her lively looks a sprightly mind disclose. – Pope. To make known, as that which has been kept secret or hidden; to reveal; to expose; as, events have disclosed his designs. If I disclose my passion, Our friendship 's an end. – Addison. Syn: To uncover; open; unveil; discover; reveal; divulge; tell; utter.

discriminative adj. Drawing distinctions; capable of making fine distinctions; expressing careful judgment; “discriminative censure.” Observing or marking a difference or distinctions; making differences; discriminating; distinguishing; distinctive; characteristic. That peculiar and discriminative form of life. – Johnson.

disfigurement n. An appearance that has been spoiled or is misshapen; “there were distinguishing disfigurements on the suspect's back”; “suffering from facial disfiguration” [syn: deformity] 2: the act of damaging the appearance or surface of something; “the defacement of an Italian mosaic during the Turkish invasion”; “he objected to the dam's massive disfigurement of the landscape” [syn: defacement]

disintegrated v. intr. To separate into integrant parts; to reduce to fragments or to powder; to break up, or cause to fall to pieces, as a rock, by blows of a hammer, frost, rain, and other mechanical or atmospheric influences. 1. To become reduced to components, fragments, or particles. 2. To lose cohesion or unity: pressures that cause families to disintegrate 3. Physics & Chemistry. To decompose, decay, or undergo a nuclear transformation.

dispensational adj. dispensation n. 1. The act of dispensing. Something dispensed. A specific arrangement or system by which something is dispensed. 2. An exemption or release from an obligation or rule, granted by or as if by an authority. 3. 1. An exemption from a church law, a vow, or another similar obligation granted in a particular case by an ecclesiastical authority. 2. The document containing this exemption. 4. Theology. 1. The divine ordering of worldly affairs. 2. A religious system or code of commands considered to have been divinely revealed or appointed. [Medieval Latin dispnsti, dispnstin-, from Latin, distribution, management, from dispnstus, past participle of dispnsre, to distribute. dispense.]

dissolution n. 1. Decomposition into fragments or parts; disintegration. 2. Indulgence in sensual pleasures; debauchery. 3. Termination or extinction by disintegration or dispersion: The dissolution of the empire was remarkably swift. 4. Extinction of life; death. 5. Annulment or termination of a formal or legal bond, tie, or contract. 6. Formal dismissal of an assembly or legislature. 7. Reduction to a liquid form; liquefaction. The act or process of dissolving: as separation into component parts. Death. “grew convinced of his friend's approaching dissolution” —Elinor Wylie

diverse adj. Differing one from another. Made up of distinct characteristics, qualities, or elements; different; unlike; dissimilar; distinct; separate. Our roads are diverse: farewell, love! said she. – R. Browning. Various; distinctly dissimilar or unlike; “diverse parts of the country”; “celebrities as diverse as Bob Hope and Bob Dylan”; “animals as various as the jaguar and the cavy and the sloth” 2. Capable of various forms; multiform; divers – (many and different; “tourist offices of divers nationalities”; “a person of diverse talents”)

divert v. 1. deviate, divert – (turn aside; turn away from) 2. divert – (send on a course or in a direction different from the planned or intended one) 3. amuse, divert, disport – (occupy in an agreeable, entertaining or pleasant fashion; “The play amused the ladies”) 4. divert, hive off – (withdraw (money) and move into a different location, often secretly and with dishonest intentions)

divest tr.v. divested, divesting, divests 1. To strip, as of clothes. “She divested herself of her outdoor clothes” 2. a. To deprive, as of rights or property; dispossess; take away possessions from someone. b. To free of; rid: “Most secretive of men, let him at last divest himself of secrets, both his and ours” (Brendan Gill). 3. To sell off or otherwise dispose of (a subsidiary company or an investment). [Alteration (influenced by Medieval Latin dvestre, to undress), of devest.]

divestment n. The act of divesting: divest v. To strip, as of clothes. To deprive, as of rights or property; dispossess. 2. To free of; rid: “Most secretive of men, let him at last divest himself of secrets, both his and ours” (Brendan Gill). To sell off or otherwise dispose of (a subsidiary company or an investment). [Alteration (influenced by Medieval Latin dvestre, to undress), of devest.]

divine adj. diviner, divinest a. Having the nature of or being a deity. b. Of, relating to, emanating from, or being the expression of a deity: sought divine guidance through meditation. c. Being in the service or worship of a deity; sacred. Superhuman; godlike. a. Supremely good or beautiful; magnificent: a divine performance of the concerto. b. Extremely pleasant; delightful: had a divine time at the ball. Heavenly; perfect. n. A cleric. A theologian. v. divined, divining, divines v. tr. To foretell through or as if through the art of divination. a. To know by inspiration, intuition, or reflection. b. To guess. To locate (underground water or minerals) with a divining rod; douse. v. intr. To practice divination. To guess. [Middle English, from Old French devine, from Latin dvnus, divine, foreseeing, from dvus, god; see dyeu- in Indo- European roots. V., Middle English divinen from Old French deviner, from Latin dv n re, from dv nus.] divinely adv. divineness n. diviner n.

divinity n. The state of being divine; the nature or essence of God; deity; godhead. 2. The Deity; the Supreme Being; God. This the divinity that within us. – Addison. 3. Something divine or superhuman; supernatural power or virtue; something which inspires awe. There's such divinity doth hedge a king. – Shak. 4. The science of divine things; the science which treats of God, his laws and moral government, and the way of salvation; theology. Divinity is essentially the first of the professions. – Coleridge. [Middle English, from Old French devine, from Latin divinus, divine, foreseeing, from divus, god. See deiw-., V., Middle English divinen, from Old French deviner, from Latin divinare, from divinus, foreseeing.]

domains n. 1. A territory over which rule or control is exercised. 2. A sphere of activity, concern, or function; a field: the domain of history. The land of one with paramount title and absolute ownership.

dominance n. The condition or fact of being dominant. dom-i-nant (dom-nnt) adj. 1. Exercising the most influence or control. 2. Most prominent, as in position; ascendant. 3. Genetics. Of, relating to, or being an allele that produces the same phenotypic effect whether inherited with a homozygous or heterozygous allele. 4. Ecology. Of, relating to, or being a species that is most characteristic of an ecological community and usually determines the presence, abundance, and type of other species. 5. Music. Relating to or based on the fifth tone of a diatonic scale. n. 1. Genetics. A dominant allele or trait. 2. Ecology. A dominant species. 3. Music. The fifth tone of a diatonic scale. [Middle English dominaunt, from Old French, from Latin dominans, dominant-, present participle of dominari, to dominate.] --dom'i-nant-ly adv. SYNONYM: dominant, predominant, preponderant, paramount, preeminent These adjectives mean surpassing all others in power, influence, or position. Dominant applies to what exercises principal control or authority or is unmistakably ascendant. Predominant is often nearly identical with dominant but more often implies being uppermost at a particular time or for the time being: "Egrets, gulls and small mammals are the predominant wildlife on the island these days" (Dan McCoubrey). Preponderant implies superiority as the result of outweighing or outnumbering all others: "No big modern war has been won without preponderant sea power" (Samuel Eliot Morison). Paramount means first in importance, rank, or regard: "My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union" (Abraham Lincoln). Preeminent especially suggests generally recognized supremacy: He is the preeminent tenor of the modern era.

dominate (dom-nat)v. dom-i-nat-ed, dom-i-nat-ing, dom-i-nates. v. tr. 1. To control, govern, or rule by superior authority or power: Successful leaders dominate events rather than react to them. 2. To exert a supreme, guiding influence on or over: Ambition dominated their lives. 3. To enjoy a commanding, controlling position in: a drug company that dominates the tranquilizer market. 4. To overlook from a height: a view from the cliffside chalet that dominates the valley. v. intr. 1. To have or exert strong authority or mastery. 2. To be situated in or occupy a position that is more elevated or decidedly superior to others. [Latin dominari, dominat-, to rule, from dominus, lord.] --dom'i-na'tive adj. --dom'i-na'tor n. To surpass in power, importance, or influence. v. predominate, dominate, govern, loom large, overshadow, prevail, rule. To occupy the preeminent position in. v. dominate, domineer, have the upper hand, hold sway, overshadow, predominate, reign, rule, preponderate, prevail, govern, control. To acquire or maintain a monopoly of. v. monopolize, control, corner the market in, dominate, hog (slang). Antonyms: share, divide. To rise above, especially so as to afford a view of. v. overlook, dominate, look down, overshadow, tower above. To make insignificant by comparison. v. outshine, dominate, eclipse, overshadow, show up, surpass, top, upstage. To command in an arrogant manner. v. boss, dominate, domineer, lord it over, order about, push around, shove around.

ecstasy n. rapture, transport, exaltation – (a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion; “listening to sweet music in a perfect rapture”- Charles Dickens) (a state of elated bliss)

edify tr.v. edified, edifying, edifies To instruct especially so as to encourage intellectual, moral, or spiritual improvement. [Middle English edifien, from Old French edifier, from Late Latin aedificre, to instruct spiritually, from Latin, to build. See edifice.]

effect n. In general: That which is produced by an agent or cause; the event which follows immediately from an antecedent, called the cause; result; consequence; outcome; fruit; as, the effect of luxury. effect v. To bring into existence. To produce as a result. To bring about. An effect is produced by the action of an agent or a cause and follows it in time: “Every cause produces more than one effect”

effective adj. Producing a decided, decisive, claimed, or desired effect 1. Having an intended or expected effect; producing a strong impression or response; striking: gave an effective performance as Othello. 2. Operative; in effect: The law is effective immediately. 3. Existing in fact; actual: a decline in the effective demand. 4. Prepared for use or action, especially in warfare.

effected (imp. & p. p.) of effect: effect (n.) Execution; performance; realization; operation; as, the law goes into effect in May. Effect (n.) Manifestation; expression; sign. Effect (n.) In general: That which is produced by an agent or cause; the event which follows immediately from an antecedent, called the cause; result; consequence; outcome; fruit; as, the effect of luxury. Effect (n.) Impression left on the mind; sensation produced. Effect (n.) Power to produce results; efficiency; force; importance; account; as, to speak with effect. Effect (n.) Consequence intended; purpose; meaning; general intent; -- with to. Effect (n.) The purport; the sum and substance. Effect (n.) Reality; actual meaning; fact, as distinguished from mere appearance. Effect (n.) Goods; movables; personal estate; -- sometimes used to embrace real as well as personal property; as, the people escaped from the town with their effects. Effecting (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Effect Effect (v. t.) To produce, as a cause or agent; to cause to be. Effect (v. t.) To bring to pass; to execute; to enforce; to achieve; to accomplish. Effecter (n.) One who effects.

equivalate See equivalence (i-kwiv-lns) n. 1. The state or condition of being equivalent; equality. 2. Mathematics. An equivalence relation. The state of being equivalent : equivalence, equality, par, parity, evenness, equivalency, uniformity, sameness. Antonyms: inequality, dissimilarity, difference. And equivalent (i-kwiv-lnt) adj. 1. Equal, as in value, force, or meaning. Having similar or identical effects. 2. Being essentially equal, all things considered: a wish that was equivalent to a command. 3. Mathematics. Capable of being put into a one-to-one relationship. Used of two sets. Having virtually identical or corresponding parts. 4. Chemistry. Having the same ability to combine. n. Abbr. equiv., eq. 1. Something that is essentially equal to another: "Prejudicing vital foreign policy considerations in order to rescue individuals finds its domestic equivalent in the inflated awards paid to ... accident and malpractice victims" (Moorhead Kennedy). 2. Chemistry. Equivalent weight. [Middle English, from Late Latin aequivalens, aequivalent-, present participle of aequivalere, to have equal force : aequi-, equi- + valere, to be strong.] --e-quiv'a-lent-ly adv. Something analogous to something else : parallel, analog, congener, correlative, correspondent, counterpart, equal, equivalent, homologue, match.Antonyms: opposite, reverse.

embark v 1: go on board; used of ships or aircraft [ant: disembark] 2: set out on (an enterprise, subject of study, etc.); "she embarked upon a new career" [syn: enter] 3: proceed somewhere despite the risk of possible dangers; "We ventured into the world of high-tech and bought a supercomputer" [syn: venture] embark (v. t.) To cause to go on board a vessel or boat; to put on shipboard. (v. t.) To engage, enlist, or invest (as persons, money, etc.) in any affair; as, he embarked his fortune in trade. Embark (v. i.) To go on board a vessel or a boat for a voyage; as, the troops embarked for Lisbon. Embark (v. i.) To engage in any affair.

embodiment n. A new personification of a familiar idea; “the embodiment of hope.” The act of embodying; the state of being embodied. 2. That which embodies or is embodied; representation in a physical body; a completely organized system, like the body; as, the embodiment of courage, or of courtesy; the embodiment of true piety.

emergence n. 1. The gradual beginning or coming forth; “figurines presage the emergence of sculpture in Greece” [syn: outgrowth, growth] 2: the becoming visible; “not a day's difference between the emergence of the andrenas and the opening of the willow catkins” [syn: egress, issue] 3: the act of emerging [syn: emersion] 4: the act of coming (or going) out; becoming apparent [syn: egress, egression]

en masse adv. en masse, en bloc, as a group – (all together; “the students turned out en masse”)

en- pref. 1. To put into or onto: encapsulate. In; into; within: enzootic. 2. To go into or onto: enplane. 3. To cover or provide with: enrobe. 4. To cause to be: endear. 5. Thoroughly. It is sometimes used to give a causal force, as in enable, enfeeble, to cause to be, or to make, able, or feeble; and sometimes merely gives an intensive force, used as an intensive: entangle, enchasten.

enabled v. To supply with the means, knowledge, or opportunity; make able: a hole in the fence that enabled us to watch; techniques that enable surgeons to open and repair the heart. To make feasible or possible: funds that will enable construction of new schools. 2. To give legal power, capacity, or sanction to: a law enabling the new federal agency. 3. To make operational; activate: enabled the computer's modem; enable a nuclear warhead.

encircuitment n. en- pref. + circuit: the complete path (of an electric current) including usually the source of (electric) energy + -ment suff. 1. Action; process: appeasement. 2. Result of an action or process: advancement. 3. Means, instrument, or agent of an action or process: adornment.

encompass v. include in scope; include as part of something broader; have as one's sphere or territory; “This group encompasses a wide range of people from different backgrounds”; “this should cover everyone in the group” [syn: embrace, comprehend, cover] encompasses v. embrace, encompass, comprehend, cover.

encounter encountered v. To come up against: encounter numerous obstacles. To meet, especially unexpectedly; come upon; come against face to face; to confront, either by chance, suddenly, or deliberately. To meet in opposition or with hostile intent; to engage in conflict with; to oppose; to struggle with; as, two armies encounter each other; to encounter obstacles or difficulties, to encounter strong evidence of a truth. Then certain philosophers of the Epicureans, and of the Stoics, encountered him. – (Acts xvii. 18.) I am most fortunate thus accidentally to encounter you. – Shak.

encountered (v.i.) To meet face to face; to have a meeting; to meet, esp. as enemies; to engage in combat; to fight; as, three armies encountered at Waterloo. (v.t.) A meeting face to face; a running against; a sudden or incidental meeting; an interview. (v.t.) A meeting, with hostile purpose; hence, a combat; a battle; as, a bloody encounter. encounter (adv.) To come against face to face; to meet; to confront, either by chance, suddenly, or deliberately; especially, to meet in opposition or with hostile intent; to engage in conflict with; to oppose; to struggle with; as, to encounter a friend in traveling; two armies encounter each other; to encounter obstacles or difficulties, to encounter strong evidence of a truth.

endorses v. 1. back, endorse, indorse, plump for, plunk for, support – (be behind; approve of; “He plumped for the Labor Party”; “I backed Kennedy in 1960") 2. second, back, endorse, indorse – (give support or one's approval to; “I'll second that motion”; “I can't back this plan”; “endorse a new project”) 3. certify, endorse, indorse – (guarantee as meeting a certain standard; “certified grade AAA meat”) 4. endorse, indorse – (of documents or cheques)

endowed adj. Provided or supplied or equipped with (especially as by inheritance or nature); “an well-endowed college”; “endowed with good eyesight”; “endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights.” v. 1. To furnish with money or its equivalent, as a permanent fund for support; to make pecuniary provision for; to settle an income upon; especially, to furnish with dower; as, to endow a wife; to endow a public institution, as, to endow hospitals and almshouses. 2. To enrich or furnish with anything of the nature of a gift (as a quality or faculty); – followed by with, as, man is endowed by his Maker with reason; to endow with privileges or benefits. endowment n. Syn: gift, empower, invest, endue, enrich or furnish with anything of the nature of a gift (as a quality or faculty).

endowing v. tr.v. endow 1. To enrich or furnish with anything of the nature of a gift (as a quality or faculty); – followed by with, as, man is endowed by his Maker with reason; to endow with privileges or benefits. To equip or supply with a talent or quality: Nature endowed you with a beautiful singing voice. 2. To imagine as having a usually favorable trait or quality: endowed the family pet with human intelligence. 3. To provide with property, income, or a source of income. To furnish with money or its equivalent, as a permanent fund for support; to make pecuniary provision for; to settle an income upon; especially, to furnish with dower; as, to endow a wife; to endow a public institution. Endowing hospitals and almshouses.

endowment n. 1. The act of endowing. 2. Funds or property donated to an institution, individual, or group as a source of income. (“his generous endowment of the laboratory came just in the nick of time”) 3. A natural gift, ability, or quality. 4. A result or product of endowing: as a: the income of an institution derived from donations, the university's ability to attract endowment b: the property (as a fund) donated to an institution or organization that is invested and producing income: an endowment to maintain the gallery 5. An endowed organization or institution, a foundation: chairwoman of the state's arts endowment.

energization n. To give energy to; activate or invigorate.

enlighten (en-litn) v.tr. enlightened, en-light-en-ing, en-light-ens. 1. To give spiritual or intellectual insight to: "Enlighten the people generally, and tyranny and oppression of body and mind will vanish like evil spirits at the dawn of day" (Thomas Jefferson). 2. To give information to; inform or instruct.--en-light'en-er n. To free from illusion or false belief. v. enlighten, disenchant, disentrance, disillusion, set straight, undeceive. Antonyms: mislead, delude. To enable to understand. v. enlighten, edify, educate, illuminate, illumine, improve, irradiate, uplift, guide, instruct, direct, school, show, teach, train, tutor. Antonyms: mystify, perplex, bewilder, confound. To impart knowledge or skill to. v. teach, enlighten, instruct, educate, school, train, coach, tutor, ground, give instruction, prepare, ready, instill, familiarize with, coach, edify, equip, inculcate, prime, drill, discipline, indoctrinate. (v.t.) To supply with light; to illuminate; as, the sun enlightens the earth.

enlightened adj 1: highly educated; having extensive information or understanding; “an enlightened public”; “knowing instructors”; “a knowledgeable critic”; “a knowledgeable audience” [syn: knowing, knowledgeable, learned, lettered, well-educated, well-read] 2: having knowledge and spiritual insight; [ant: unenlightened] 3: freed from illusion [syn: disillusioned] 4: having or based on relevant experience; “an educated guess”; “an enlightened electorate” [syn: educated]

enlightenment n. Act of enlightening, or the state of being enlightened or instructed: education that results in understanding and the spread of knowledge [ant: unenlightenment] 2: (Hinduism and Buddhism) the beatitude that transcends the cycle of reincarnation; characterized by the extinction of desire and suffering and individual consciousness [syn: Nirvana] 3: a movement in the 18th century that advocated the use of reason in the reappraisal of accepted ideas and social institutions [syn: Enlightenment, Age of Reason]

enshrouds v. To cover with or as if with a shroud: Clouds enshrouded the summit. shroud: 1. A cloth used to wrap a body for burial; a winding sheet. 2. Something that conceals, protects, or screens: under a shroud of fog. 3. Nautical. One of a set of ropes or wire cables stretched from the masthead to the sides of a vessel to support the mast. A similar supporting line for a smokestack or comparable structure. One of the ropes connecting the harness and the canopy of a parachute. 1. To wrap (a corpse) in burial clothing. 2. To shut off from sight; screen, block. 3. Archaic. To shelter; protect.v. intr. Archaic. To take cover; find shelter.[Middle English, garment, from Old English scrud.]

ensues intr.v. ensue, ensued, ensuing, ensues To follow as a consequence or result; to take place subsequently. To follow or come afterward; to follow as a consequence or in chronological succession; to result; as, an ensuing conclusion or effect; the year ensuing was a cold one. So spoke the Dame, but no applause ensued. – Pope. Syn: To follow; pursue; succeed. [Middle English ensuen, from Old French ensuivre, ensu-, from Vulgar Latin nsequere, from Latin nsequ, to follow closely : in-, intensive pref.; see en-1 + sequ, to follow]

enterprise n. 1. An undertaking, especially one of some scope, complication, and risk. 2. A business organization. 3. Industrious, systematic activity, especially when directed toward profit: Private enterprise is basic to capitalism. 4. Willingness to undertake new ventures; initiative: “Through want of enterprise and faith men are where they are, buying and selling, and spending their lives like serfs” (Henry David Thoreau). That which is undertaken; something attempted to be performed; a work projected which involves activity, courage, energy, and the like; a bold, arduous, or hazardous attempt; an undertaking; as, a manly enterprise; a warlike enterprise. Their hands can not perform their enterprise. – Job v. 12. Willingness or eagerness to engage in labor which requires boldness, promptness, energy, and like qualities; as, a man of great enterprise.

enthroned v. 1. invest, vest, enthrone – (provide with power and authority; “They vested the council with special rights”) 2. enthrone, throne – (put a monarch on the throne; “The Queen was enthroned more than 50 years ago”)
enthronement (n.) The act of enthroning, or state of being enthroned. enthrone (v. t.) To seat on a throne; to exalt to the seat of royalty or of high authority; hence, to invest with sovereign authority or dignity.

enthronement (n.) The act of enthroning, or state of being enthroned. enthrone (v. t.) To seat on a throne; to exalt to the seat of royalty or of high authority; hence, to invest with sovereign authority or dignity.

entities n.pl. entity n. A real being, whether in thought (as an ideal conception) or in fact; being; essence; existence. Something that exists as a particular and discrete unit: Persons and corporations are equivalent entities under the law. The existence of something considered apart from its properties. entity (enti-te) n.pl. en-ti-ties. 1. Something that exists as a particular and discrete unit: Persons and corporations are equivalent entities under the law. 2. The fact of existence; being. 3. The existence of something considered apart from its properties. [Medieval Latin entitas, from Latin ens, ent-, present participle of esse, to be.] Something having material existence: entity, article, creation, item, object, tangible, structure, creature, being, body, substance, thing. Antonyms: nonentity, illusion, phantom, mirage, delusion. Someone or something that exists independently : individual, being, entity, somebody, person, organism. Self-subsisting entities, such as our own personality. – Shairp. Fortune is no real entity, . . . but a mere relative signification. – Bentley.

envelop v. To enclose or encase completely with or as if with a covering: “Accompanying the darkness, a stillness envelops the city” (Curtis Wilkie). To put a covering about; to wrap up or in; to inclose within a case, wrapper, integument or the like; to surround entirely; as, to envelop goods or a letter; the fog envelops a ship. “Nocturnal shades this world envelop.” (J. Philips).

envisage v. 1. To conceive an image or a picture of, especially as a future possibility: envisaged a world at peace. 2. To consider or regard in a certain way. To look in the face of; to apprehend; to regard; to form a mental image of something that is not present or that is not yet the case. [syn: imagine, conceive of, ideate]

epoch n. 1. era, epoch – (a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event) 2. A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy. 3. epoch, date of reference – A notable event that marks the beginning of such a period. 4. epoch – (a unit of geological time) A unit of geologic time that is a division of a period. 5. Astronomy. An instant in time that is arbitrarily selected as a point of reference; the precise date that is the point of reference for which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is referred. [Medieval Latin epocha, measure of time, from Greek epokh, a point in time.] epoch n. 1. A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy. 2. A notable event that marks the beginning of such a period. 2. A unit of geologic time that is a division of a period. 3. Astronomy. An instant in time that is arbitrarily selected as a point of reference. A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy. A notable event that marks the beginning of such a period. 2. A unit of geologic time that is a division of a period. 3. Astronomy. An instant in time that is arbitrarily selected as a point of reference. [Medieval Latin epocha, measure of time, from Greek epokhe, a point in time.]

equivalent n. 1. Something equivalent; that which is equal in value, worth, weight, or force; as, to offer an equivalent for damage done. Equal in amount or value; “like amounts”; “equivalent amounts”; “the same amount”; “gave one six blows and the other a like number”; “an equal number”; “the same number” [syn: like, equal, same] [ant: unlike] 2: being essentially equal to something; “it was as good as gold”; “a wish that was equivalent to a command”; “his statement was tantamount to an admission of guilt” [syn: tantamount(p)] n 1: a person or thing equal to another in value or measure or force or effect or significance etc; “send two dollars or the equivalent in stamps”

eras n. A fixed point of time, usually an epoch, from which a series of years is reckoned. 2. A period of time reckoned from some particular date or epoch; a succession of years dating from some important event; as, the era of Alexander; the era of Christ, or the Christian era. 1. A period of time as reckoned from a specific date serving as the basis of its chronological system. 2. A period of time characterized by particular circumstances, events, or personages: the Colonial era of U.S. history; the Kennedy era. A point that marks the beginning of such a period of time. See Synonyms at period. 3. The longest division of geologic time, made up of one or more periods. [Late Latin aera, from Latin, counters, pl. of aes, aer-, bronze coin.]

eruption n. 1. The act of breaking out or bursting forth; as: (a) A violent throwing out of flames, lava, etc., as from a volcano of a fissure in the earths crust. (b) A sudden and overwhelming hostile movement of armed men from one country to another. – Milton. (c) A violent commotion. All Paris was quiet . . . to gather fresh strength for the next day's eruption. – W. Irving. 2. That which bursts forth. 3. A violent exclamation; ejaculation.

essential adj. 1. Constituting or being part of the essence of something; inherent. 2. Basic or indispensable; necessary: essential ingredients; indispensable. Belonging to the essence, or that which makes an object, or class of objects, what it is. Majestic as the voice sometimes became, there was forever in it an essential character of plaintiveness. – Hawthorne. 2. Hence, really existing; existent. Is it true, that thou art but a name, And no essential thing? – Webster (1623). 3. Important in the highest degree; indispensable to the attainment of an object; indispensably necessary. Judgment's more essential to a general Than courage. – Denham. How to live? – that is the essential question for us. – H. Spencer. (a.) Belonging to the essence, or that which makes an object, or class of objects, what it is. Essential (a.) Hence, really existing; existent. Essential (a.) Important in the highest degree; indispensable to the attainment of an object; indispensably necessary. Essential (a.) Containing the essence or characteristic portion of a substance, as of a plant; highly rectified; pure; hence, unmixed; as, an essential oil. Essential (a.) Necessary; indispensable; -- said of those tones which constitute a chord, in distinction from ornamental or passing tones. Essential (a.) Idiopathic; independent of other diseases. Esential (n.) Existence; being. Esential (n.) That which is essential; first or constituent principle; as, the essentials or religion. Essentiality (n.) The quality of being essential; the essential part. Esentially (adv.) In an essential manner or degree; in an indispensable degree; really; as, essentially different. essence (n.) The predominant qualities or virtues of a plant or drug, extracted and refined from grosser matter; or, more strictly, the solution in spirits of wine of a volatile or essential oil; as, the essence of mint, and the like.

eternal adj. 1. Being without beginning or end; existing outside of time; infinite. 2. Continuing without interruption; perpetual. 3. Forever true or changeless: eternal truths. 4. Seemingly endless; interminable; ageless; continual. 5. Of or relating to spiritual communion with God, especially in the afterlife. n. 1. Something timeless, uninterrupted, or endless. 2. Eternal. God. Used with the. --e'ter-nal'i-ty (etr-nali-te). or e-ter'nal-ness n. [Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin aeternalis, from Latin aeternus.]

eternally adv. Without end; forever. adj. eternal, nonstop, ceaseless, constant, continuous, endless, enduring, everlasting, infinite, never-ending, perpetual, timeless, imperishable, undying, unending. Antonyms: unenduring, ephemeral. Incapable of being destroyed. adj. indestructible, eternal, everlasting, ineradicable, inextinguishable, uneradicable. Antonyms: destructible. [Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin aeternalis, from Latin aeternus.]

eternalize v. tr. e-ter-nal-ized, e-ter-nal-iz-ing, e-ter-nal-iz-es. To cause to last endlessly. To make eternal. To protract for an indefinite period. 2. To make perpetually famous; immortalize. Syn: immortalize, eternalize, perpetuate, eternize. [French eterniser, from Old French eterne, eternal.] – eternization n. eternalizes eternalized v. To make eternal. To make famous for ever. [syn: immortalize]

eternity (i-turni-te) n.pl. e-ter-ni-ties. 1. Time without beginning or end; infinite time. 2. The state or quality of being eternal. 3. The timeless state following death. The afterlife; immortality. 4. A very long or seemingly endless time: waited in the dentist's office for an eternity. [Middle English eternite, from Old French, from Latin aeternitas, from aeternus, eternal.]

ethical n. 1. ethical – (of or relating to the philosophical study of ethics; “ethical codes”; “ethical theories”) 2. ethical (vs. unethical) – (conforming to accepted standards of social or professional behavior; “an ethical lawyer”; “ethical medical practice”; “an ethical problem”; “had no ethical objection to drinking”; “Ours is a world of nuclear giants and ethical infants”- Omar N. Bradley) 3. ethical, honorable, moral – (adhering to ethical and moral principles; “it seems ethical and right”; “followed the only honorable course of action”; “had the moral courage to stand alone”)

eventual adj. 1. Occurring at an unspecified time in the future; ultimate: his eventual failure; last. Archaic. Dependent on circumstance; contingent. e-ven-tu-al-i-ty n.pl. e-ven-tu-al-i-ties. Something that may occur; a possibility. An action or state brought about by a cause: result, aftereffect, aftermath, consequence, fallout, effect, event, eventuality, issue, outcome, precipitate, sequel, sequence, upshot. Something that may occur or be done: possibility, chance, contingency, eventuality, likelihood, prospect, odds. [French eventuel, from Latin eventus, outcome.] eventually adv. At an unspecified future time.

eventuate v : come out in the end; to come out finally or in conclusion; to result; to come to pass. To result ultimately. eventuating v. (come out in the end)

eventually adv. At an unspecified future time

evolution n. 1. A process in which something changes into a different and usually more complex or better form. 2. The process of developing. 3. Biology. The theory that groups of organisms change with passage of time, mainly as a result of natural selection, so that descendants differ morphologically and physiologically from their ancestors. The historical development of a related group of organisms; phylogeny. 4. A movement that is part of a set of ordered movements. [Latin evolutio, evolution-, from evolutus, past participle of evolvere, to unroll.]  Note: In this (the second) universe age, evolution is the technique of creation. Evolution takes place suddenly, in one generation – not gradually, as is generally thought.

evolutionary adj. Advance from a simple to a more complex form: evolution, development, evolvement, growth, progress, progression, unfolding, advancement, extension.
 
evolve v. evolved, evolving, evolves. v. tr. 1. To develop or achieve: evolve a style of one's own. To work (something) out; devise: “the schemes he evolved to line his purse” (S.J. Perelman). 2. Biology. To develop (a characteristic) by evolutionary processes. 3. To give off; emit.v. intr. 1. To undergo change; develop: an amateur acting group that evolved into a theatrical company. 2. Biology. To develop or arise through evolutionary processes. [Latin evolvere, to unroll: e-, ex-, ex- + volvere, to roll.] – e-volv'a-ble adj. – e-volve'ment n. To grow or develop into. v. become, amount to, evolve, mature, ripen, maturate, bloom.

ex officio adj. By virtue of office or position. “the Vice President serves ex officio as president of the Senate” “an ex officio member of the board.” [Latin] [syn: by right of office]

exalt (g-zÔlt) tr.v. exalted, exalting, exalts 1. To raise in rank, character, or status; elevate: exalted the shepherd to the rank of grand vizier. 2. To glorify, praise, or honor. 3. To increase the effect or intensity of; heighten: works of art that exalt the imagination. 1. To raise high; to elevate; to lift up; to raise in rank, character, or status. I will exalt my throne above the stars of God. – (Is.xiv.13) Exalt thy towery head, and lift thine eyes – (Pope) 2. To elevate in rank, dignity, power, wealth, character, or the like; to dignify; to promote; as, to exalt a prince to the throne, a citizen to the presidency. Righteousness exalteth a nation. – (Prov. xiv.34) He that humbleth himself shall be exalted. – (Luke xiv.11) 3. To glorify, praise, or honor. To elevate by praise or estimation; to magnify; to extol. “Exalt ye the Lord.” – (Ps. xcix.5) In his own grace he doth exalt himself. – Shak. 4. To lift up with joy, pride, or success; to inspire with delight or satisfaction; to elate. They who thought they got whatsoever he lost were mightily exalted. – (Dryden) 5. To elevate the tone of, as of the voice or a musical instrument. – Is. xxxvii.23. Now Mars, she said, let Fame exalt her voice. – (Prior) 6. To increase the effect or intensity of; heighten. (Alchem.) To render pure or refined; to intensify or concentrate; as, to exalt the juices of bodies. With chemic art exalts the mineral powers. – (Pope) (Obsolete.) To fill with sublime emotion; elate. [Middle English exalten, from Latin exaltre : ex-, up, away; see ex- + altus, high]

exaltation n. 1. ecstasy, rapture, transport – (a state of being carried away by overwhelming emotion; “listening to sweet music in a perfect rapture”- Charles Dickens) 2. exaltation – (the location of a planet in the zodiac at which it is believed to exert its maximum influence) 3. exaltation – (a flock of larks (especially a flock of larks in flight overhead) 4. deification, exaltation, apotheosis – (the elevation of a person (as to the status of a god)

exalted adj. Raised to lofty height; elevated; extolled; refined; dignified; sublime. 1. Elevated in rank, character, or status. 2. Lofty; sublime; noble: an exalted dedication to liberty. 1. Elevated in rank, character, or status. 2. Lofty; sublime; noble: an exalted dedication to liberty. Obsolete. Filled with sublime emotion; elated.

exclusive adj 1: being independent from or not shared by others; not divided or shared with others; “they have exclusive use of the machine”; “sole rights of publication” [syn: sole] 2: limiting or limited to possession, ownership, or use; excluding much or all; especially all but a particular group or minority; “exclusive clubs”; “an exclusive restaurants and shops” [ant: inclusive] 3: not divided among or brought to bear on more than one object or objective; “gained their exclusive attention” [syn: single, undivided]
exclusively adv. Not divided or shared with others; without any others being included or involved; “was entirely to blame”; “a school devoted exclusively to the needs of problem children”; “he works for Mr. Smith exclusively” [syn: entirely, solely, alone, only].

execution n. 1. The act of executing; a carrying into effect or to completion; performance; achievement; consummation; as, the execution of a plan, a work, etc.The excellence of the subject contributed much to the happiness of the execution.– Dryden. 2. A putting to death as a legal penalty; death lawfully inflicted; as, the execution of a murderer. A warrant for his execution. – Shak. 3. The act of the mode of performing a work of art, of performing on an instrument, of engraving, etc.; as, the execution of a statue, painting, or piece of music. The first quality of execution is truth. – Ruskin. 4. (Law) (a) The carrying into effect the judgment given in a court of law. (b) A judicial writ by which an officer is empowered to carry a judgment into effect; final process. (c) The act of signing, and delivering a legal instrument, or giving it the forms required to render it valid; as, the execution of a deed, or a will. 5. That which is executed or accomplished; effect; effective work; – usually with do. To do some fatal execution. – Shak.

executive n. 1. A person or group having administrative or managerial authority in an organization. 2. The chief officer of a government, state, or political division. 3. The branch of government charged with putting into effect a country”s laws and the administering of its functions. adj. Designed or fitted for execution, or carrying into effect; as, executive talent; qualifying for, concerned with, or pertaining to, the execution of the laws or the conduct of affairs; as, executive power or authority; executive duties, officer, department, etc. Note: In government, executive is distinguished from legislative and judicial; legislative being applied to the organ or organs of government which make the laws; judicial, to that which interprets and applies the laws; executive, to that which carries them into effect or secures their due performance.

exemplary adj. Worthy of imitation; commendable: exemplary behavior. Serving as a model. Serving as a pattern; deserving to be proposed for imitation; commendable; as, an exemplary person; exemplary conduct.

exhaust (ig-zost)v. ex-haust-ed, ex-haust-ing, ex-hausts. v. tr. 1. To wear out completely. See Synonyms at tire1. 2. To drain of resources or properties; deplete: tobacco crops that exhausted the soil. See Synonyms at deplete. 3. To use up completely: exhausted our funds before the month was out. 4. To treat completely; cover thoroughly: exhaust a topic. 5. To draw out the contents of; drain: exhaust a tank gradually. 6. To let out or draw off: exhaust vaporous wastes through a pipe. v. intr. To escape or pass out: Steam exhausts through this valve. n. 1. The escape or release of vaporous waste material, as from an engine. The fumes or gases so released. 2. A duct or pipe through which waste material is emitted. 3. An apparatus for drawing out noxious air or waste material by means of a partial vacuum. [Latin exhaurire, exhaust- : ex-, ex- + haurire, to draw.] --ex-haust'ed-ly adv. --ex-haust'er n. --ex-haust'i-bil'i-ty n. --ex-haust'i-ble adj. --ex-haust'ing-ly adv A smoky or vaporous substance given off : emission, emanation, exhaust, effluvium, miasma, discharge, fumes, pollutant, impurity, waste. To exert to the utmost. v. strain, exhaust, stretch, tax, fatigue, do double duty. To deplete utterly one's energies or inner resources. v. exhaust, burn out, poop out (informal), shoot one's bolt, do in (slang), knock out, fatigue, drain, overtire, sap one's energy. Antonyms: invigorate, refresh, renew, revive, strengthen. To use all of. v. consume, deplete, devour, dissipate, polish off, drain, eat up, exhaust, finish, go through, run out of, run through, sap, use up, spend. Antonyms: conserve, preserve, save. To lessen or exhaust the energy, strength, or courage of. v. debilitate, devitalize, exhaust, tire, sap, drain, weary, bleed, dilute, enfeeble, enervate, fatigue, overtire, prostrate, water down, fag out (informal), frazzle, poop (informal), weaken, emasculate, unman, unnerve. Antonyms: invigorate, energize, empower, vitalize. To cause to lose energy, strength, or vigor. v. debilitate, enervate, weaken, drain, enfeeble, exhaust, gnaw, short-circuit, waste, wear out. Antonyms: vitalize, strengthen, energize. To lose strength or power. v. tire, exhaust, deplete, flag, fade, wane, fizzle out, fall apart, decline, give out, decline, go downhill, sink, weaken, peter out, hit the skids, waste away, wear out, languish, deteriorate, fail, run out of gas, run out of steam, poop out. Antonyms: freshen, recover, brace up. To fatigue with dullness or tedium. v. bore, pall, tire, weary, exhaust, wear out. Antonyms: excite, interest. To remove the contents of completely. v. drain, empty, evacuate, exhaust, void. Antonyms: fill, replenish.

exhilarating v. thrill, exalt, beatify – (fill with sublime emotion); “The children were exhilarated at the prospect of going to the movies.” exhilarate To cause to feel happily refreshed and energetic; elate: We were exhilarated by the cool, pine-scented air. 2. To invigorate; stimulate: bold designs that exhilarate the viewer's imagination. [Latin exhilarare, exhilarat- : ex-, intensive pref. See EX- + hilarare, to make cheerful (from hilaris, hilarus, cheerful, from Greek hilaros).]

exhortation n. 1. The act or an instance of exhorting. 2. A speech or discourse that encourages, incites, or earnestly advises. Advice as to a decision or course of action: recommendation, counsel, direction, guidance, opinion, piece of advice, prompting, urging, exhortation, pointer, tip, suggestion. An earnest or urgent request: appeal, call, cry, demand, entreaty, exhortation, petition, plea, prayer, solicitation, suit, supplication. Antonyms: refusal, rejection, repudiation, denial.

exigencies n.pl. 1. Urgent requirements; pressing needs. exigency – (a pressing or urgent situation; “the health-care exigency”) 2. emergency, exigency, pinch – (a sudden unforeseen crisis (usually involving danger) that requires immediate action; “he never knew what to do in an exigency”) A volatile situation requiring immediate response : emergency, crisis, crunch, danger, dangerousness, dire straits, desperate straits, distress, exigency, extremity, matter of life and death, trouble, predicament. Something indispensable : necessity, essential, must, precondition, prerequisite, something needed, exigency, requirement, sine qua non. Something required : necessity, basic, essential, fundamental, prerequisite, requirement, sine qua non, must, exigency. A decisive point : crisis, crossroads, exigency, head, juncture, pass, climax, critical stage, turning point, point of decision.

existence (n.) The state of existing or being; actual possession of being; continuance in being; as, the existence of body and of soul in union; the separate existence of the soul; immortal existence. Existence (n.) Continued or repeated manifestation; occurrence, as of events of any kind; as, the existence of a calamity or of a state of war. Existence (n.) That which exists; a being; a creature; an entity; as, living existences.

existent adj. Having life or being; existing; real. Occurring or present at the moment; current. Having being or existence; existing; being; occurring now; taking place. The eyes and mind are fastened on objects which have no real being, as if they were truly existent. – Dryden.

existential adj. 1. Of, relating to, or dealing with existence, esp. human existence. 2. Based on experience; empirical; existential – (derived from experience or the experience of existence; “the rich experiential content of the teachings of the older philosophers”) 3. Of or as conceived by existentialism or existentialists: an existential moment of choice. “formal logicians are not concerned with existential matters”- John Dewey) Syn: empirical, existential, factual, observable, experiential, real.

existentially adv. Based on fact, observation, or experience. adj. empirical, existential, factual, observable, experiential, real.

expatiate v. 1. Add details, as to an account or idea; clarify the meaning of and discourse in a learned way, usually in writing; “She elaborated on the main ideas in her dissertation” [syn: elaborate, lucubrate, exposit, enlarge, flesh out, expand, expound, dilate] [ant: abridge] To speak or write at length: expatiated on the subject until everyone was bored. To enlarge in discourse or writing; to be copious in argument or discussion; to descant. He expatiated on the inconveniences of trade. – Addison. 2. To wander freely. To range at large, or without restraint. Bids his free soul expatiate in the skies. – Pope.

experience n. 1. The apprehension of an object, a thought, or an emotion through the senses or mind: a child's first experience of snow. 2. Active participation in events or activities, leading to the accumulation of knowledge or skill: a lesson taught by experience; a carpenter with experience in wall and roof repair. The knowledge or skill so derived. 3. An event or a series of events participated in or lived through. The totality of such events in the past of an individual or a group.v. tr. ex-per-i-enced, ex-per-i-enc-ing, ex-per-i-enc-es. To participate in personally; undergo: experience a great adventure; experienced loneliness. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin experientia, from experiens, experient-, present participle of experiri, to try.] – ex-pe'ri-enc-er n. Syn: experience, suffer, sustain, taste, undergo. The central meaning shared by these verbs is “to encounter or partake of personally”: experience happiness; suffer a loss; sustained an injury; tasted freedom; has undergone a religious conversion. Something that happens: event, circumstance, episode, happening, incident, occasion, occurrence, thing, experience. Past events surrounding a person: background, biography, career, experience, grounding, history, life. Antonyms: future. To go through (life) in a certain way. experience v. live, channel, conduct, experience, lead, spend. To be physically aware of through the senses. v. sense, experience, feel, perceive.

experiential adj. Relating to or derived from or pertaining to, experience. Derived from, or pertaining to, experience; relating to or resulting from experience; “a personal, experiential reality.” It is called empirical or experiential . . . because it is divan to us by experience or observation, and not obtained as the result of inference or reasoning. Derived from experience or the experience of existence; “the rich experiential content of the teachings of the older philosophers.” experiential, existential – 1: relating to or resulting from experience; “a personal, experiental reality” 2: derived from experience or the experience of existence; “the rich experiential content of the teachings of the older philosophers”- Benjamin Farrington; “formal logicians are not concerned with existential matters”- John Dewey. 1. The apprehension of an object, a thought, or an emotion through the senses or mind: a child's first experience of snow. 2. Active participation in events or activities, leading to the accumulation of knowledge or skill: a lesson taught by experience; a carpenter with experience in wall and roof repair. The knowledge or skill so derived. 3. An event or a series of events participated in or lived through. The totality of such events in the past of an individual or a group. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin experientia, from experiens, experient-, present participle of experiri, to try.] To be physically aware of through the senses. experientially adv. by experience

experiment n. Abbr. exp., expt. 1. A test under controlled conditions that is made to demonstrate a known truth, examine the validity of a hypothesis, or determine the efficacy of something previously untried. The process of conducting such a test; experimentation. 2. An innovative act or procedure: “Democracy is only an experiment in government” (William Ralph Inge) . 3. The result of experimentation: “We are not [nature's] only experiment” (R. Buckminster Fuller) .v. intr. ex-per-i-ment-ed, ex-per-i-ment-ing, ex-per-i-ments (-ment) . 1. To conduct an experiment. 2. To try something new, especially in order to gain experience: experiment with new methods of teaching. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin experimentum, from experiri, to try.] – ex-per'i-ment'er n. A procedure designed to answer a question: test, dry run, experiment, experimentation, trial, trial run, probe, check, feeler, analysis, investigation, tryout. To engage in experimentation. v. experiment, assay, sample, test out, try out. experimentation (ik-sper-men-tashn) n. The act, process, or practice of experimenting. A procedure designed to answer a question: test, dry run, experiment, experimentation, trial, trial run, probe, check, feeler, analysis, investigation, tryout.

expressive a. 1. Serving to express, utter, or represent; indicative; communicative; – followed by of; as, words expressive of his gratitude. Each verse so swells expressive of her woes. – Tickell. 2. Full of expression; vividly representing the meaning or feeling meant to be conveyed; significant; emphatic; as, expressive looks or words. You have restrained yourself within the list of too cold an adieu; be more expressive to them. – Shak. Through her expressive eyes her soul distinctly spoke. – Littelton. – Expressively, adv. – Expressiveness, n. (1) Serving to express, utter, or represent; indicative; communicative; – followed by of; as, words expressive of his gratitude. (2) Full of expression; vividly representing the meaning or feeling meant to be conveyed; significant; emphatic; as, expressive looks or words.

exquisite adj. 1. Characterized by intricate and beautiful design or execution: an exquisite chalice. 2. Of such beauty or delicacy as to arouse intense delight: an exquisite sunset. 3. Excellent; flawless: plays the piano with exquisite technique. 4. Acutely perceptive or discriminating: “Blind dolphins have been known to survive in the wild, guided by exquisite acoustic images of their prey” (Kenneth Browser). 5. Intense; keen: suffered exquisite pain. [Middle English exquisit, carefully chosen, from Latin exqustus, past participle of exqurere, to search out : ex-, ex- + quaerere, to seek.] exquisiteness n. 1. keen – (intense or sharp; “suffered exquisite pain”; “felt exquisite pleasure”) 2. exquisite, recherche – (lavishly elegant and refined) 3. dainty, exquisite – (of delicate composition and artistry; “a dainty teacup”; “an exquisite cameo”) 4. exquisite – (of extreme beauty; “her exquisite face”)

exquisitely adv. In an exquisite manner or degree; as, lace exquisitely wrought. adj. 1. Characterized by intricate and beautiful design or execution: an exquisite chalice. 2. Of such beauty or delicacy as to arouse intense delight: an exquisite sunset. See Synonyms at delicate. 3. Excellent; flawless: plays the piano with exquisite technique. 4. Acutely perceptive or discriminating. 5. Intense; keen. To a sensitive observer there was something exquisitely painful in it. – Hawthorne. [Middle English exquisit, carefully chosen, from Latin exqustus, past participle of exqurere, to search out : ex-, ex- + quaerere, to seek.] exquisiteness n.

extradivine extra- pref. Outside; beyond; something in addition to what is due, expected, or customary + divine

extraordinary adj. Beyond or out of the common order or method; not usual, customary, regular, or ordinary; as, extraordinary remedies. Which dispose To something extraordinary my thoughts. – Milton. 2. Exceeding the common degree, measure. or condition; hence, remarkable; uncommon; rare; wonderful; highly exceptional; remarkable, as, extraordinary talents or grandeur. 3. Employed or sent upon an unusual or special service, function, or occasion; as, an ambassador extraordinary.

facilitate tr.v. facilitated, facilitating, facilitates To make easy or easier: political agreements that facilitated troop withdrawals. Ease, alleviate – (make easier; “you could facilitate the process by sharing your knowledge”) help, facilitate – (be of use; “This will facilitate the prevention of accidents”) facilitate – (physiology: increase the likelihood of a response); “The stimulus facilitates a delayed impulse”) To make easy or easier: political agreements that facilitated troop withdrawals. [French faciliter, from Old French, from Italian facilitare, from facile, facile, from Latin facilis. facile.]

factualize = factual adj 1: of the nature of fact; having actual existence; “rocks and trees...the actual world”; “actual heroism”; “the actual things that produced the emotion you experienced” [syn: actual] 2: of or relating to or characterized by facts; “factual considerations” 3: existing in fact whether with lawful authority or not; “de facto segregation is as real as segration imposed by law”; “a de facto state of war” [syn: de facto, actual] [ant: de jure] 4: based on fact; “factual accuracy”; “a factual account” 5: characterized by fact; “the factual aspects of the case” + -ize suff. 1. To cause to be or to become: dramatize. 2. To cause to conform to or resemble: Hellenize. 3. To treat as: idolize. 4. To treat or affect with: anesthetize. 5. To subject to: tyrannize. 6. To treat according to or practice the method of: pasteurize. 7. To become; become like: materialize. 8. To perform, engage in, or produce: botanize.

fallacy n. 1. A false notion, a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning [syn: false belief] 2. A statement or an argument based on a false or invalid inference. 3. Incorrectness of reasoning or belief; erroneousness. 4. The quality of being deceptive. 1. Deceptive or false appearance; deceitfulness; that which misleads the eye or the mind; deception. Winning by conquest what the first man lost, By fallacy surprised. – Milton. 2. (Logic) An argument, or apparent argument, which professes to be decisive of the matter at issue, while in reality it is not; a sophism. Syn: Deception; deceit; mistake. Usage: Fallacy, Sophistry. A fallacy is an argument which professes to be decisive, but in reality is not; sophistry is also false reasoning, but of so specious and subtle a kind as to render it difficult to expose its fallacy. Many fallacies are obvious, but the evil of sophistry lies in its consummate art. “Men are apt to suffer their minds to be misled by fallacies which gratify their passions. Many persons have obscured and confounded the nature of things by their wretched sophistry; though an act be never so sinful, they will strip it of its guilt.'' – South. [Alteration of Middle English fallace, from Old French, from Latin fallcia, deceit, from fallx, fallc-, deceitful, from fallere, to deceive.]

fallible adj. 1. fallible (vs. infallible) – (likely to fail or be inaccurate; “everyone is fallible to some degree”) 2. fallible, frail, imperfect, weak – (having the attributes of man as opposed to e.g. divine beings; “I'm only human”; “frail humanity”)

fascinating from fascinate (v.t.) To influence in an uncontrollable manner; to operate on by some powerful or irresistible charm; to bewitch; to enchant. Fascinate (v. t.) To excite and allure irresistibly or powerfully; to charm; to captivate, as by physical or mental charms. Fascination (n.) The act of fascinating, bewitching, or enchanting; enchantment; witchcraft; the exercise of a powerful or irresistible influence on the affections or passions; unseen, inexplicable influence. Fascination (n.) The state or condition of being fascinated. Fascination (n.) That which fascinates; a charm; a spell.

fetters n. A chain or shackle for the ankles or feet. [They] bound him with fetters of brass. – Judg. xvi. 21. 2. Something that serves to restrict; a restraint. Anything that confines or restrains. Passion's too fierce to be in fetters bound. – Dryden.

fiat n. 1. An arbitrary order or decree. 2. Authorization or sanction: government fiat; an authoritative but arbitrary order; a legally binding command or decision entered on the court record (as if issued by a court or judge).

fictitious adj. 1. fabricated, fancied, fictional, fictitious, invented, made-up – (formed or conceived by the imagination; “a fabricated excuse for his absence”; “a fancied wrong”; “a fictional character”; “used fictitious names”; “a made-up story”) 2. assumed, false, fictitious, fictive, pretended, put on, sham – (adopted in order to deceive; “a fictitious, assumed name”; “a fictitious, assumed cheerfulness”; “a fictitious address”; “fictive sympathy”; “a fictitious, pretended interest”; “a fictitious put-on childish voice”; “fictitious, sham modesty”)

figuratively adv. (in a figurative sense; “figuratively speaking,...”) figurative adj. 1. figurative (vs. literal), nonliteral – (used of the meanings of words or text) not literal; using figures of speech; “figurative language”) 2. figural, figurative – (consisting of or forming human or animal figures; “a figural design”; “the figurative art of the humanistic tradition”- Herbert Read)

finite Having a limit; limited in quantity, degree, or capacity; bounded; bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent [ant: infinite]; as, finite number; finite existence; a finite being; a finite mind; finite duration. Having bounds; limited: a finite list of choices; our finite fossil fuel reserves. Existing, persisting, or enduring for a limited time only; impermanent. 2. Mathematics. Being neither infinite nor infinitesimal. Having a positive or negative numerical value; not zero. Possible to reach or exceed by counting. Used of a number. Having a limited number of elements. Used of a set. 3. Grammar. Limited by person, number, tense, and mood. Used of a verb that can serve as a predicate or the initial element of one. n. A finite thing. [Middle English finit, from Latin finitus, past participle of finire, to limit, from finis, end.]

finitude n. The quality or condition of being finite. [syn: finiteness, boundedness] [ant: infiniteness]

finity n. The condition of being finite. Limited. With an end or limit; having a countable number of elements; subject to measurable limitations.

flash v. To appear or occur suddenly: The image flashed onto the screen. To move or proceed rapidly: The cars flashed by.

fluctuations n. 1. A motion like that of waves; a moving in this and that direction; as, the fluctuations of the sea. 2. A wavering; unsteadiness; as, fluctuations of opinion; fluctuations of prices. 1: a wave motion; “the fluctuations of the sea” 2: an instance of change; the rate or magnitude of change [syn: variation] 3: the quality of being unsteady and subject to fluctuations; “he kept a record of price fluctuations” [syn: wavering] 1 : a motion like that of waves; especially : the wavelike motion of a fluid collected in a natural or artificial cavity of the body observed by palpation or percussion 2 a : a slight and nonheritable variation; especially : such a variation occurring in response to environmental factors b : recurrent and often more or less cyclic alteration (as of form, size, or color of a bodily part).

focalizations n 1: the confinement of an infection to a limited area; to concentrate or be concentrated; localize. 2: the act of bringing into focus; to be brought to a focus; sharpen.

focalize v.tr. intr. focalized, focalizing, focalizes. 1. To adjust or come to a focus. 2. To bring or be brought to a focus; sharpen. 3. To concentrate or be concentrated; localize. focalization n. The act of focalizing or bringing to a focus, or the state of being focalized.

foreknow v. anticipate, foresee – (realize beforehand)

forgather v. To gather together; assemble. To convene; collect in one place; “We assembled in the church basement”; “Let's gather in the dining room” [syn: meet, gather, assemble]

formulate v. tr. formulated, formulating, formulates. 1. Explicate, formulate, develop – (elaborate, as of theories and hypotheses; “Could you develop the ideas in your thesis”); to state as or reduce to a formula. To express in systematic terms or concepts. Give voice, formulate, word, phrase, articulate – (put into words or an expression; “He formulated his concerns to the board of trustees”) To devise or invent: formulate strategy. 2. Invent, contrive, devise, excogitate, formulate, forge – (come up with (an idea, plan, explanation, theory, or principle) after a mental effort; “formulate a way to measure the speed of light”); to prepare according to a specified formula. To arrange in some system. Syn: categorize, mold, cast, describe, formulate, sort, type; phrase, couch, describe, express, formulate, put, term, word; to make clear or clearer; explain, clarify, delineate, formulate, disambiguate, elucidate, explicate, illuminate, illustrate, interpret, spell out, define. Antonyms: obfuscate, confuse, disarrange, unsort.

formulation n 1. inventing or contriving an idea or explanation and formulating it mentally [syn: conceptualization] 2. the style of expressing yourself; “he suggested a better formulation;” “his manner of expression showed how much he cared” [syn: expression] 3. a substance prepared according to a formula [syn: preparation] formulate v. to put in a clear and definite form of statement or expression.

forthwith adv. At once; immediately; without delay or hesitation; with no time intervening; directly. Immediately there fell from his eyes as it had been scales; and he received sight forthwith. – Acts ix. 18.

fortuitous adj. 1. causeless, fortuitous, uncaused – (having no cause or apparent cause; “a causeless miracle”; “fortuitous encounters – strange accidents of fortune”; “we cannot regard artistic invention as...uncaused and unrelated to the times”) 2. fortuitous – (occurring by happy chance; “profits were enhanced by a fortuitous drop in the cost of raw materials”)
 
fragment n. 1. A small part broken off or detached. 2. An incomplete or isolated portion; a bit: overheard fragments of their conversation; extant fragments of an old manuscript. v. fragmented, fragmenting, fragments (ment). v. tr. To break or separate (something) into fragments. v. intr. To become broken into fragments: After the election, the coalition fragmented. [Middle English, from Latin fragmentum, from frangere, frag, to break. bhreg.] A portion severed from a whole : fragment, cutting, section, segment, shard, slice, sliver, snippet, bit, chunk, morsel, scrap, shred. To undergo partial breaking. v. crack, cleave, fissure, fracture, fragment, part, rupture, snap, splinter, split. To become reduced to pieces or components. v. fragment, break apart, break up, divide, chop up, dice, cut up, cube, crumble, chip, decompose, disintegrate, fall apart, shatter, shiver, splinter, split, disunite, decompound. To separate into parts, sections, or branches. v. segment, break up, split, divide, subdivide, carve, fragment, partition, slice, cleave, cut up, disjoint, dissect, dissever, section, sever, sunder. Antonyms: meld, fuse, join, unite.

fragmentized adj. A small part broken off or detached. fragmentable adj. Able to fragment. (fragmnt) n. 1. A small part broken off or detached. 2. An incomplete or isolated portion; a bit: overheard fragments of their conversation; extant fragments of an old manuscript. v. fragmented, fragmenting, fragments (ment). v. tr. To break or separate (something) into fragments. v. intr. To become broken into fragments: After the election, the coalition fragmented. [Middle English, from Latin fragmentum, from frangere, frag, to break. bhreg.] A portion severed from a whole : fragment, cutting, section, segment, shard, slice, sliver, snippet, bit, chunk, morsel, scrap, shred. To undergo partial breaking. v. crack, cleave, fissure, fracture, fragment, part, rupture, snap, splinter, split. To become reduced to pieces or components. v. fragment, break apart, break up, divide, chop up, dice, cut up, cube, crumble, chip, decompose, disintegrate, fall apart, shatter, shiver, splinter, split, disunite, decompound. To separate into parts, sections, or branches. v. segment, break up, split, divide, subdivide, carve, fragment, partition, slice, cleave, cut up, disjoint, dissect, dissever, section, sever, sunder. Antonyms: meld, fuse, join, unite.

fraternal (fr-turnl) adj. 1. Of or relating to brothers: a close fraternal tie. Showing comradeship; brotherly. 2. Of or constituting a fraternity: a fraternal association. 3. Biology. Of, relating to, or being a twin developed from two separately fertilized ova; dizygotic. [Middle English, from Old French fraternel, from Medieval Latin fraternalis, from Latin fraternus, from frater, brother.] --fra-ter'nal-ism n. --fra-ter'nal-ly adv.

fraught adj. Freighted; laden; filled; stored; charged; pregnant – (filled with or attended with; “words fraught with meaning”; “an incident fraught with danger”; “a silence pregnant with suspense” A vessel of our country richly fraught. – Shak. Filled with a specified element or elements; charged: an incident fraught with danger; an evening fraught with high drama. Marked by or causing distress; emotional; marked by distress; “a fraught mother-daughter relationship”

gradations n. 1. A series of gradual, successive stages; a systematic progression. 2. A degree or stage in such a progression. 3. A passing by barely perceptible degrees from one tone or shade, as of color, to another.

grandeur n. 1. The quality or condition of being grand; magnificence; the quality of being magnificent or splendid or grand [syn: magnificence, brilliance, splendor, splendour, grandness] “The world is charged with the grandeur of God” (Gerard Manley Hopkins). The state or quality of being grand; vastness; greatness; splendor; magnificence; stateliness; sublimity; dignity. 2. Nobility or greatness of character; the quality of being exalted in character or ideals or conduct [syn: nobility, magnanimousness] elevation of thought or expression; nobility of action. [F., fr. grand.]

grotesque adj. Characterized by ludicrous or incongruous distortion, as of appearance or manner. Distorted and unnatural in shape or size; abnormal and hideous; “tales of grotesque serpents eight fathoms long that churned the seas”; “twisted into monstrous shapes” [syn: monstrous, unnatural] Outlandish or bizarre, as in character or appearance. Fantastic. ludicrously odd; “Hamlet's assumed antic disposition”; “fantastic Halloween costumes”; “a grotesque reflection in the mirror” [syn: antic, fantastic, fantastical] n : art characterized by an incongruous mixture of parts of humans and animals interwoven with plants.

hailing v. To salute or greet. To greet or acclaim enthusiastically. An exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting. “Hail, brave friend.” – Shak.

Havona (Index:
Havona) (hah vohn' ah). The central and divine universe, an eternal, wholly created, and perfect planetary family containing one billion worlds arranged in seven concentric circuits contiguous to and surrounding Paradise. (152,1)[14:0.1].

hindrance n. Something immaterial that interferes with or delays action or progress [syn: deterrent, impediment, balk, baulk, check, handicap]; the act of hindering or obstructing or impeding [syn: interference] . 2. One that hinders; an impediment; an obstacle; an impediment; any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome [syn: hitch, preventive, preventative, encumbrance, incumbrance, interference] What various hindrances we meet. – Cowper. Something between a hindrance and a help. – Wordsworth. Syn: Impediment; obstruction; obstacle; difficulty; interruption; check; delay; restraint.

homage n. court, homage – (special honor or respect shown or expressed publicly) (respect or reverential regard; deference; especially, respect paid by external action; obeisance) (respectful deference; “pay court to the emperor”) (pay reverence to by external action) Homage, fealty. Homage was originally the act of a feudal tenant by which he declared himself, on his knees, to be the homage or bondman of the lord; hence the term is used to denote reverential submission or respect. Fealty was originally the fidelity of such a tenant to his lord, and hence the term denotes a faithful and solemn adherence to the obligations we owe to superior power or authority. “We pay homage to men of preeminent usefulness and virtue, and profess our fealty to the principles by which they have been guided.”

horrific (ho-rifik, ho-) adj. Causing horror; terrifying. [Latin horrificus : horrere, to tremble + -ficus, -fic.] --hor-rif'i-cal-ly adv. Arousing fear, horror, or loathing. adj. alarming, dreadful, scary, fearsome, frightening, terrifying, weird, eldritch, dire, direful, awful, appalling, terrific, horrendous, shocking, terrible, frightful, disgusting, odious, revolting, hideous, loathsome, repulsive, nightmarish, monstrous, horrific, horrible, grisly, ghastly, gruesome, macabre, morbid, atrocious, brutish, grotesque, ghoulish, hateful, horrid. Antonyms: appealing, pleasant, attractive, lovely. Shockingly evil, frightening, or ugly. adj. abominable, heinous, abhorrent, bestial, odious, horrible, horrid, horrific, hideous, bloodcurdling, monstrous, gruesome, freakish, frightful, grotesque, terrifying, dreadful, scary, shocking, bizarre, appalling, awful. Antonyms: pleasant, pleasing, attractive, inviting, delightful, charming, agreeable, lovely.

host (host) n. 1. An army. 2. A great number; a multitude. See Synonyms at multitude.[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin hostis, from Latin, enemy.] A very large number or amount of something: multitude, mountain, quantities, host, slew, legion, crowd, flood, army, mass, myriad, bushels, dozens, gobs, heaps (informal), loads, wads, droves, lots, oodles (informal), reams, scads, scores, tons, stacks, jillion (informal), zillion (informal). An indefinite amount or extent : quantity, couple, multitude, crowd, abundance, host, army, group, mass, swarm, array, number, mob, bunch.

humanize v. humanism, secular humanism – (the doctrine emphasizing a person's capacity for self-realization through reason; rejects religion and the supernatural)

hypothetical adj. 1. Of, relating to, or based on a hypothesis: a hypothetical situation; theoretical. 2. Suppositional; uncertain; conditional; contingent. Characterized by, or of the nature of, an hypothesis; assumed without proof, for the purpose of reasoning and deducing proof, or of accounting for some fact or phenomenon. “Causes hypothetical at least, if not real, for the various phenomena of the existence of which our experience informs us.” – Sir W. Hamilton.

idealized adj. 1. Exalted to an ideal perfection or excellence; to attribute ideal characteristics and excellences to. Of, relating to, or embodying an ideal. Conforming to an ultimate form or standard of perfection or excellence -- a sometimes unattainable standard of perfection. 2. Considered the best of its kind. 3. Completely or highly satisfactory 4. Philosophy. Existing as an archetype or pattern, especially as a Platonic idea or perception. idealize v. 1. To regard as ideal. 2. To make or envision as ideal. ideal n. 1. A conception of something in its absolute perfection. 2. One that is regarded as a standard or model of perfection or excellence. 3. An ultimate object of endeavor; a goal. 4. An honorable or worthy principle or aim.

imagination (Index) (i-maj-nashn) n. 1. The formation of a mental image of something that is neither perceived as real nor present to the senses. The mental image so formed. The ability or tendency to form such images. 2. The ability to confront and deal with reality by using the creative power of the mind; resourcefulness: handled the problems with great imagination. 3. A traditional or widely held belief or opinion. 4. Archaic. An unrealistic idea or notion; a fancy. A plan or scheme.--i-mag'i-na'tion-al adj. SYNONYM: imagination, fancy, fantasy. These nouns refer to the power of the mind to form images, especially of what is not present to the senses. Imagination is the most broadly applicable: The actor rehearsed the lines in his imagination. The glorious music haunts my imagination. "In the world of words, the imagination is one of the forces of nature" (Wallace Stevens). Fancy especially suggests mental invention that is whimsical, capricious, or playful and that is characteristically well removed from reality: "which ... claims to be founded not on fancy ... but on Fact" (Arthur P. Stanley). Is world peace only the fancy of idealists? Fantasy is applied principally to the product of imagination given free rein and especially to elaborate or extravagant fancy: The sitting room was a kind of Victorian fantasy, full of cabbage roses, fringe, and tassels. "The poet is in command of his fantasy, while it is exactly the mark of the neurotic that he is possessed by his fantasy" (Lionel Trilling). Imaginative cleverness in making or designing : ingenuity, creativeness, creativity, ingeniousness, invention, inventiveness, skill, skillfulness, imagination, aptitude, adroitness, mastery, expertise, resourcefulness, astuteness. Antonyms: stupidity, ineptitude, unskillfulness, awkwardness. The power of the mind to form images : imagination, fancy, fantasy, imaginativeness, mind's eye, inventiveness, creativity, invention, creative thought.

immanence n. 1. Existing or remaining within; inherent: believed in a God immanent in humans. The condition or quality of being immanent; inherence; an indwelling. The state of being within. 2. Restricted entirely to the mind; subjective. [Late Latin immanens, immanent-, present participle of immanere, to remain in : Latin in-, in. See IN-2 + Latin manere, to remain.]

immaterial adj. Of no importance or relevance; inconsequential or irrelevant. Of so little importance or relevance as to have no significant impact on an outcome. Of no substantial consequence; without weight or significance; unimportant; as, it is wholly immaterial whether he does so or not. Syn: Unimportant; inconsequential; insignificant; inconsiderable; trifling.

immersed v. 1. To cover completely in a liquid; submerge. To plunge into anything that surrounds or covers, especially into a fluid; to dip; to sink; to bury; to immerge. Deep immersed beneath its whirling wave. – J Warton. More than a mile immersed within the wood. – Dryden. 2. To baptize by submerging in water. 3. To engage wholly or deeply; absorb: scholars who immerse themselves in their subjects. To engross the attention of; to involve; to overwhelm. The queen immersed in such a trance. – Tennyson. It is impossible to have a lively hope in another life, and yet be deeply immersed inn the enjoyments of this. – Atterbury.

immortal adj. 1. Not subject to death: immortal deities; the immortal soul. 2. Never to be forgotten; everlasting: immortal words. 3. Of or relating to immortality. 4. Biology. Capable of indefinite growth or division. Used of cells in culture. n. 1. One not subject to death. 2. One whose fame is enduring. [Middle English, from Old French immortel, from Latin immortalis. mer.] immor'tally adv. Having the nature of a deity. adj. divine, immortal, godlike, almighty, deific, deiform, godly, holy. Antonyms: mortal.

immutable adj. Not subject or susceptible to change or variation in form or quality or nature; "the view of that time was that all species were immutable, created by God" [syn: changeless] [ant: mutable] immutability adj. immutableness n. immutably adv. [L. immutabilis; pref. im- not + mutabilis mutable.] Not mutable; not capable or susceptible of change; unchangeable; unalterable. That by two immutable things, in which it was impossible for God to lie, we might have a strong consolation. – Heb. vi. 18. Immutable, immortal, infinite, Eternal King. – Milton.

impinge v. encroach, entrench, trench – (impinge or infringe upon; “This impinges on my rights as an individual”; “This matter entrenches on other domains”) 2. encroach, infringe, impinge – (advance beyond the usual limit)

impose v. imposed, imposing, imposes. v. tr. 1. To establish or apply as compulsory; levy: impose a tax. 2. To apply or make prevail by or as if by authority: impose a peace settlement. dictate. 3. To obtrude or force (oneself, for example) on another or others. 4. Printing. To arrange (type or plates) on an imposing stone. 5. To offer or circulate fraudulently; pass off: imposed a fraud on consumers. v. intr. To take unfair advantage: You are always imposing on their generosity. [Middle English imposen, from Old French imposer, alteration (influenced by poser, to put, place. POSE1), of Latin imponere, to place upon: in, on. IN + ponere, to place. apo.] impos'er n. To prescribe expressly and with authority. v. dictate, decree, charge, command, demand, call the shots, bid, direct, enjoin, impose, instruct, ordain, order, prescribe, proclaim, rule, lay down the law, mandate. To advance beyond the proper or customary limits. v. encroach, trespass, impose, intrude, meddle, interfere, disturb, cut in, interlope, barge in, break in, chisel in, interpose, interrupt, kibitz, butt in, chime in, horn in, insinuate, intervene, obtrude. To compel observance of. v. enforce, carry out, effect, execute, implement, invoke, impose, lean on, twist someone's arm, clamp down, crack down, apply, put into action, put in force, set in motion. To force (another) to accept a burden. v. foist, fob off, impose, inflict, palm off, press on, saddle, thrust upon, unload, stick (slang), burden, pass off. To cause to undergo or bear something unwelcome or damaging. v. inflict, impose, visit, wreak, wreck, perpetrate, unload. Antonyms: spare, alleviate. To establish and apply as compulsory. v. assess, impose, exact, levy, put on.

impulse n. 1. An impelling force; an impetus. The motion produced by such a force. 2. A sudden wish or urge that prompts an unpremeditated act or feeling; abrupt inclination: had an impulse to run away; an impulse of regret that made me hesitate; bought a hat on impulse. 3. A motivating force or tendency: "Respect for the liberty of others is not a natural impulse in most men" (Bertrand Russell). 4. Electronics. A surge of electrical power in one direction. 5. Physics. The product obtained by multiplying the average value of a force by the time during which it acts. The impulse equals the change in momentum produced by the force in this time interval. 6. Physiology. The electrochemical transmission of a signal along a nerve fiber that produces an excitatory or inhibitory response at a target tissue, such as a muscle or another nerve. adj. Characterized by impulsiveness or acting on impulse: an impulse shopper; impulse buying. [Latin impulsus, from past participle of impellere, to impel.] A driving force or pressure: impetus, drive, energy, impulse, momentum, power, propulsion, push, thrust.

inaugurated v. To introduce or induct into an office with suitable ceremonies or solemnities; to invest with power or authority in a formal manner; to install; as, to inaugurate a president; to inaugurate a king. – Milton. 2. To cause to begin, esp. with formality or solemn ceremony; hence, to set in motion, action, or progress; to initiate; – used especially of something of dignity or worth or public concern; as, to inaugurate a new era of things, new methods, etc. As if kings did closes remarkable days to inaugurate their favors. – Sir H. Wotton. 3. To celebrate the completion of, or the first public use of; to dedicate, as a statue. [Colloq.] 4. To begin with good omens. [Obs.] Syn. begin; usher in, introduce; be a precursor of; “The fall of the Berlin Wall ushered in the post-Cold War period”

incarceration n : the state of being imprisoned; “he was held in captivity until he died”; “the imprisonment of captured soldiers”; “his ignominious incarceration in the local jail”; “he practiced the immurement of his enemies in the castle dungeon” [syn: captivity, imprisonment, immurement] 1. To put into jail. 2. To shut in; confine. [Medieval Latin incarcerare, incarcerat- : Latin in-, in. + Latin carcer, prison.]

incarnate adj. 1. Invested with bodily nature and form: an incarnate spirit. Invested with flesh; embodied in a human nature and form; united with, or having, a human body. Here shalt thou sit incarnate. – Milton. 2. Embodied in human form; personified. I fear nothing... that devil carnate or incarnate can fairly do. Substantiate; embodies; represent in bodily form. adj. Invested with bodily nature and form: an incarnate spirit. Embodied in human form; personified: a villain who is evil incarnate. 2. Incarnadine. v. tr. in-car-nat-ed, in-car-nat-ing, in-car-nates (-nat). 1. To give bodily, especially human, form to. To personify. 2. To realize in action or fact; actualize: a community that incarnates its founders' ideals. [Middle English, from Late Latin incarnatus, past participle of incarnare, to make flesh : Latin in-, causative pref. See IN-2 + Latin caro, carn-, flesh.]

incarnation n. 1. The act of clothing with flesh, or the state of being so clothed; the act of taking, or being manifested in, a human body and nature. 2. (Theol.) The union of the second person of the Godhead with manhood in Christ. 3. An incarnate form; a personification; a manifestation; a reduction to apparent from; a striking exemplification in person or act. She is a new incarnation of some of the illustrious dead. – Jeffrey. The very incarnation of selfishness. – F. W. Robertson. 1. The act of incarnating; the condition of being incarnated. 2. Incarnation Christianity. The doctrine that the Son of God was conceived in the womb of Mary and that Jesus is true God and true man. 3. A bodily manifestation of a supernatural being. 4. One who is believed to personify a given abstract quality or idea. 5. A period of time passed in a given bodily form or condition: hopes for a better life in another incarnation. (Easton”s 1897 Bible Dictionary) Incarnation, that act of grace whereby Christ took our human nature into union with his Divine Person, became man. Christ is both God and man. Human attributes and actions are predicated of him, and he of whom they are predicated is God. A Divine Person was united to a human nature (Acts 20:28; Rom. 8:32; 1 Cor. 2:8; Heb. 2:11-14; 1 Tim. 3:16; Gal. 4:4, etc.). The union is hypostatical, i.e., is personal; the two natures are not mixed or confounded, and it is perpetual.

incessant adj. Continuing without interruption; continual. Continuing or following without interruption; unceasing; unitermitted; uninterrupted; continual; as, incessant clamors; incessant pain, etc. Against the castle gate, . . . Which with incessant force and endless hate, They batter'd day and night and entrance did await. – Spenser. Syn: Unceasing; uninterrupted; unintermitted; unremitting; ceaseless; continual; constant; perpetual.

indicative adj. 1. Serving to indicate: symptoms indicative of anemia; an insignia indicative of high rank. Serving as a symbol. Syn: symbolic, emblematic, emblematical, indicative, representational, representative, token. Of, providing, or constituting evidence. adj. evidentiary, demonstrative, designative, evidential, forensic, indicative, verificative. Pointing out; bringing to notice; giving intimation or knowledge of something not visible or obvious.

indigenous adj. 1. Originating and living or occurring naturally in an area or environment. Originating where it is found; native. 2. Intrinsic; innate. having originated in and being produced, growing, or living naturally in a particular region or environment. Being inborn or innate, as, a type of behavior that is indigenous to human beings. Native; produced, growing, or living, naturally in a country or climate; not exotic; not imported. In America, cotton, being indigenous, is cheap. Native; inherent; innate. Joy and hope are emotions indigenous to the human mind.

indispensable adj. 1. Not to be dispensed with; essential. 2. Obligatory; unavoidable: the routine but indispensable ceremonies of state. n. One that is indispensable. Not to be dispensed with; essential; indispensable, critical, crucial, integral, mandatory, necessary, pivotal, required, compulsory, requisite, vital, needed. Antonyms: dispensible, disposable, throwaway.

indistinguishable adj. Not distinguishable, especially: Impossible to differentiate or tell apart: indistinguishable twins; markings that make a moth indistinguishable from its background. Impossible to discern; imperceptible: a sound that was indistinguishable to the human ear. Not distinguishable; not capable of being perceived, known, or discriminated as separate and distinct; hence, not capable of being perceived or known; as, in the distance the flagship was indistinguishable; the two copies were indistinguishable in form or color; the difference between them was indistinguishable.

individualizes tr.v. individualized, individualizing, individualizes 1. To give individuality to. 2. To consider or treat individually; particularize. 3. To modify to suit the wishes or needs of a particular individual: individualized the work schedules of all the physicians.

indivisibility n. The state or property of being indivisible or inseparable; inseparability. indivisible (nd-vz-bl) adj. 1. Incapable of undergoing division. 2. Mathematics. Incapable of being divided without a remainder: The number 15 is indivisible by 7. indivisibly adv.

indulgence n. 1. indulgence, self-indulgence – (an inability to resist the gratification of whims and desires) 2. indulgence, lenience, leniency – (a disposition to yield to the wishes of someone; "too much indulgence spoils a child") 3. indulgence, indulging, pampering, humoring – (the act of indulging or gratifying a desire) 4. folly, foolery, tomfoolery, craziness, lunacy, indulgence – (foolish or senseless behavior) 5. indulgence – (the remission by the pope of the temporal punishment in purgatory that is still due for sins even after absolution; "in the Middle Ages the unrestricted sale of indulgences by pardoners became a widespread abuse")

indwelling adj. To dwell in; to abide within; to remain in possession; dwelling or residing within. 2. Placed or implanted within the body. n. An inner presence, as of a spirit or power. indwells v. To exist as an animating or divine inner spirit, force, or principle. 2. To be located or implanted inside something. To inhabit or reside within as such a spirit, force, or principle.

inerrant adj. inerrable, unerring – (not liable to error; “the Church was... theoretically inerrant and omnicompetent” -G.G.Coulton; “lack an inerrant literary sense”; “an unerring marksman”) Incapable of erring; infallible. 2. Containing no errors.

inevitabilities n.pl. inevitability n. (the quality of being unavoidable) Required by authority or duty; obligatory. adj. compulsory, bound, bounden, mandatory, inevitable, necessary, required. Antonyms: unobligatory, unrequired, unmandatory, optional. Impossible to avoid or prevent. adj. inevitable, destined, fated, inescapable, predestined, preordained, unavoidable. Antonyms: preventable, avoidable.

inevitable n. 1. Impossible to avoid or prevent. Certain. 2. Invariably occurring or appearing; predictable: the inevitable changes of the seasons. (an unavoidable event; "don't argue with the inevitable")

inexplicable adj. (vs. explicable), incomprehensible – (incapable of being explained or accounted for; "inexplicable errors"; "left the house at three in the morning for inexplicable reasons")

inexplicably adv. Difficult or impossible to explain or account for.

infallible adj. Not capable of erring; entirely exempt from liability to mistake; unerring. Not liable to fail, deceive, or disappoint; indubitable; sure; certain; as, infallible evidence; infallible success; an infallible remedy. To whom also he showed himself alive, after his passion, by many infallible proofs. – (Acts i. 3.) – (incapable of failure or error; “an infallible antidote”; “an infallible memory”; “no doctor is infallible”) [ant: fallible] infallible (vs. fallible) – (incapable of failure or error; "an infallible antidote"; "an infallible memory"; "the Catholic Church considers the Pope infallible"; "no doctor is infallible")

infinite adj. 1. Having no boundaries or limits. 2. Immeasurably great or large; boundless: infinite importance. 3. Mathematics. Existing beyond or being greater than any arbitrarily large value. Unlimited in spatial extent. Of or relating to a set capable of being put into onetoone correspondence with a proper subset of itself. n. Something infinite. [Middle English infinit, from Old French, from Latin infinitus: in, not. IN + finitus, finite, from past participle of finire, to limit.] in'finitely adv. infiniteness n. Syn: infinite, boundless, eternal, illimitable. The central meaning shared by these adjectives is “being without beginning or end”: infinite wisdom; boundless ambition; eternal beauty; illimitable space; sempiternal truth. incalculable. Ant: finite. Usage: Infinite is sometimes grouped with absolute terms such as unique, absolute, and omnipotent, since in its strict mathematical sense it allows no degree modification or comparison; one quantity cannot be more infinite than another (though technically one infinite set can be larger than another). Unlike other absolute terms, however, infinite also does not permit modification by adverbs such as nearly and almost; mathematically, infinity is not approached by degrees. In non-technical usage, of course, infinite is often used metaphorically to refer simply to an unimaginably large degree or amount, and here the comparison of the word is unexceptionable: Listening to the late quartets on that little gramophone, I experienced the most infinite musical joy that I have ever known. Denoting a large, indefinite number. adj. many, countless, immeasurable, infinite, innumerable, most, multiple, myriad, numberless, numerous, umpteen, umpteenth. Without end; forever. adj. eternal, nonstop, ceaseless, constant, continuous, endless, enduring, everlasting, infinite, never-ending, perpetual, timeless, imperishable, undying, unending. Antonyms: unenduring, ephemeral, few, scant, scarce.

infinity (in-fini-te) n.pl. in-fin-i-ties. 1. The quality or condition of being infinite. 2. Unbounded space, time, or quantity. 3. An indefinitely large number or amount. 4. Mathematics. The limit that a function f is said to approach at x a when for x close to a, f(x) is larger than any preassigned number. 5. A range in relation to an optical system, such as a camera lens, representing distances great enough that light rays reflected from objects within the range may be regarded as parallel. A distance setting, as on a camera, beyond which the entire field is in focus. A period of time that is or seems extremely long : eon, age, donkey's years, eternity, lifetime, month of Sundays, forever, infinity, time without end, endlessness, ages and ages, eons and eons. Antonyms: instant, moment, second, split second. The quality or state of endless time : perpetuity, endlessness, eternity, infinity, timelessness, unendingness, world without end, eternality. The state or quality of endlessness in space or amount : infinity, boundlessness, inexhaustibility, limitlessness, immeasurability. Antonyms: exhaustibility, limitedness.

Infinite Upholder: I AM self-associative, the Universal Absolute (105:2.8)

inhabit v. inhabited, inhabiting, inhabits. v. tr. 1. To live or reside in. 2. To be present in; fill: Old childhood memories inhabited the attic. v. intr. Archaic. To dwell. [Middle English enhabiten, from Old French enhabiter, from Latin inhabitare: in, in. IN + habitare, to dwell, frequentative of habere, to have. ghabh.] inhab'itabil'ity n. inhab'itable adj. inhab'ita'tion n. inhab'iter n. To live in (a place). v. inhabit, occupy, people, populate. To occupy a place that serves as a residence. v. reside, dwell, domicile, live, make one's home, occupy, room, set up housekeeping, inhabit, take up residence, tenant, lodge, remain, settle, abide, bide, board, put down roots, sojourn, stay. inhabitant n. One who dwells or resides permanently in a place, as distinguished from a transient lodger or visitor; as, an inhabitant of a house, a town, a city, county, or state. [Middle English enhabiten, from Old French enhabiter, from Latin inhabitare: in, in. IN + habitare, to dwell, frequentative of habere, to have.]

inhabitant (n.) One who dwells or resides permanently in a place, as distinguished from a transient lodger or visitor; as, an inhabitant of a house, a town, a city, county, or state. (n.) One who has a legal settlement in a town, city, or parish; a permanent resident. inhabit (inhabit) v. inhabited, inhabiting, inhabits. v. tr. 1. To live or reside in. 2. To be present in; fill: Old childhood memories inhabited the attic. v. intr. Archaic. To dwell. [Middle English enhabiten, from Old French enhabiter, from Latin inhabitare: in, in. IN + habitare, to dwell, frequentative of habere, to have.] inhab'itabil'ity n. inhab'itable adj. inhab'ita'tion n. inhab'iter n. To live in (a place). v. inhabit, occupy, people, populate. To occupy a place that serves as a residence. v. reside, dwell, domicile, live, make one's home, occupy, room, set up housekeeping, inhabit, take up residence, tenant, lodge, remain, settle, abide, bide, board, put down roots, sojourn, stay.

inhabited adj. Having inhabitants; lived in; to live or dwell in; to occupy, as a place of settled residence; as, wild beasts inhabit the forest; men inhabit cities and houses. The high and lofty One, that inhabiteth eternity. --Is. lvii. 15. O, who would inhabit This bleak world alone? --Moore.

inherent adj. Existing as an essential constituent or characteristic; intrinsic. Occurring as a natural part or consequence. Involved in the constitution or essential character of something : belonging by nature. Permanently existing in something; inseparably attached or connected; naturally pertaining to; innate; inalienable; as, polarity is an inherent quality of the magnet; the inherent right of men to life, liberty, and protection. “A most inherent baseness.” – Shak. “The sore disease which seems inherent in civilization.” – Southey. Syn: Innate; inborn; native; natural; inbred; inwrought; inseparable; essential; indispensable. [Latin inhaerens, inhaerent, present participle of inhaerere, to inhere.] 1. built-in, constitutional, inbuilt, inherent, integral – (existing as an essential constituent or characteristic; "the Ptolemaic system with its built-in concept of periodicity"; "a constitutional inability to tell the truth") 2. congenital, inborn, innate, inherent – (present at birth but not necessarily hereditary; acquired during fetal development) 3. implicit in (predicate), inherent, underlying – (in the nature of something though not readily apparent; "shortcomings inherent in our approach"; "an underlying meaning")

inimical adj. 1. Injurious or harmful in effect; adverse: habits inimical to good health. 2. Unfriendly; hostile: a cold, inimical voice.[Late Latin inimicalis, from Latin inimicus, enemy.] unfriendly – (not friendly; "an unfriendly act of aggression"; "an inimical critic") (injurious or harmful in effect; adverse: “habits inimical to good health”) (unfriendly; hostile: “a cold, inimical voice”).

iniquitous adj. Characterized by iniquity; wicked. Characterized by iniquity; unjust; wicked; as, an iniquitous bargain; an iniquitous proceeding. Demagogues . .... bribed to this iniquitous service. --Burke. Syn: Wicked; wrong; unjust; unrighteous; nefarious; criminal. Usage: Iniquitous, Wicked, Nefarious. Wicked is the generic term. Iniquitous is stronger, denoting a violation of the rights of others, usually by fraud or circumvention. Nefarious is still stronger, implying a breach of the most sacred obligations, and points more directly to the intrinsic badness of the deed.

injunction n. 1. The act or an instance of enjoining; a command, a directive, or an order. 2. Law. A court order prohibiting a party from a specific course of action. [Middle English injunccion, from Late Latin iniunctio, iniunction, from Latin iniunctus, past participle of iniungere, to enjoin: in, in. IN + iungere, to join. yeug.] injunc'tive adj. An obligatory directive: command, behest, bidding, charge, dictate, injunction, mandate, order, ultimatum, edict, decree, decretalRoman Catholic Church. A coercive measure intended to ensure compliance: penalty, sanction, injunction, order, retribution, fine, assessment, punishment.

innate adj. 1. Possessed at birth; inborn. 2. Possessed as an essential characteristic; inherent. 3. Of or produced by the mind rather than learned through experience: an innate knowledge of right and wrong. [Middle English innat, from Latin innatus, past participle of innasci, to be born in : in-, in + nasci, to be born.] 1. unconditioned (vs. conditioned), unlearned – (not established by conditioning or learning; "an unconditioned reflex") 2. natural, born (predicate), innate (predicate) – (being talented through inherited qualities; "a natural leader"; "a born musician"; "an innate talent") 3. congenital, inborn, innate, inherent – (present at birth but not necessarily hereditary; acquired during fetal development).

insight n. 1. penetration – (clear or deep perception of a situation) 2. insight, perceptiveness, perceptivity – (a feeling of understanding) 3. insight, brainstorm, brainwave – (the clear (and often sudden) understanding of a complex situation) 4. insight, sixth sense – (grasping the inner nature of things intuitively)

insurrections n. rebellion, revolt, rising, uprising – (organized opposition to authority; a conflict in which one faction tries to wrest control from another) insurrectionary – (of or relating to or given to insurrection)

integral adj. (essential or necessary for completeness; constituent: The kitchen is an integral part of a house) (possessing everything essential; entire) Lacking nothing of completeness; complete; perfect; uninjured; whole; entire. A local motion keepeth bodies integral. – Bacon. Essential to completeness; constituent, as a part; pertaining to, or serving to form, an integer; integrant. Ceasing to do evil, and doing good, are the two great integral parts that complete this duty. – South.

integrant Constituting part of a whole; integral. Integrant parts, or particles, of bodies, those smaller particles into which a body may be reduced without loss of its original constitution, as by mechanical division.

integrity n. 1. Steadfast adherence to a strict moral or ethical code. 2. The state of being unimpaired; soundness. 3. The quality or condition of being whole or undivided; completeness. [Middle English integrite, from Old French, from Latin integrits, soundness, from integer, whole, complete.]

intellect n. 1. The ability to learn and reason; the capacity for knowledge and understanding. The ability to think abstractly or profoundly. mind. 2. A person of great intellectual ability. [Middle English, from Old French intellecte, from Latin intellectus, perception, from past participle of intellegere, to perceive.

intelligible adj. 1. Capable of being understood: an intelligible set of directions. 2. Capable of being apprehended by the intellect alone. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin intellegibilis, intelligibilis, from intellegere, to perceive] intelligibly adv. Describing written or oral communication that is easily understood. adj. intelligible, clear, understandable, crystal clear, comprehensible, direct, limpid, perspicuous, plain, unambiguous. Ant: unintelligible, unclear, incomprehensible, ambiguous, indecipherable.

inter- pref. 1. Between; among: international. 2. In the midst of; within: intertropical. 3. Mutual; mutually: interrelate. 4. Reciprocal; reciprocally: intermingle. A prefix signifying among, between, amid; as, interact, interarticular, intermit, international. 1. Between; among: international, interdental. 2. In the midst of; within: intertropical, interoceptor. 3. Mutual; mutually: interrelate. 4. Reciprocal; reciprocally: intermingle.

interdependent (intr-di-pendnt) adj. Mutually dependent: "Today, the mission of one institution can be accomplished only by recognizing that it lives in an interdependent world with conflicts and overlapping interests" (Jacqueline Grennan Wexler). --in'ter-de-pend'ence or in'ter-de-pend'en-cy n. Tending, serving, or able to combine. adj. combinatorial, combinative, conjoint, interdependent, joint.

interpose v. 1. To insert or introduce between parts. 2. To place (oneself) between others or things. 1.To insert or introduce between parts. To place (oneself) between. 2. To introduce or interject (a comment, for example) during discourse or a conversation. Introduce. 3. To exert (influence or authority) in order to interfere or intervene: interpose one's veto. v.intr. 1. To come between. 2. To come between the parties in a dispute; intervene. 3. To insert a remark, a question, or an argument. [French, from Old French interposer, to intervene, alteration (influenced by poser, to put, place.), of Latin interponere, to put between : inter-, inter- + ponere, to put.

interposition n. The act of interposing, or the state of being interposed; a being, placing, or coming between; mediation.

intra- pref. Within; during. A prefix signifying in, within, interior; as, intraocular, within the eyeball; intramarginal.

intrigue (intreg, in-treg)n. 1. A secret or underhand scheme; a plot. The practice of or involvement in such schemes. See Synonyms at conspiracy. 2. A clandestine love affair.v. in-trigued, in-trigu-ing, in-trigues (in-treg).v. intr. To engage in secret or underhand schemes; plot.v. tr. 1. To effect by secret scheming or plotting. 2. To arouse the interest or curiosity of: Hibernation has long intrigued biologists.[Probably from French intriguer, to plot, from Italian intrigare, to plot, from Latin intricare, to entangle. INTRICATE.] --in-trigu'er n. --in'trigu'ing-ly adv. USAGE NOTES: The introduction of the verb intrigue to mean "to arouse the interest or curiosity of" was initially resisted by writers on usage as an unneeded French substitute for available English words such as interest, fascinate, or puzzle, but it now appears to be well established. A usually brief romance entered into lightly : flirtation, affair, dalliance, fling, intrigue, amour, liaison. A secret agreement or plan to attain a wrongful end : conspiracy, cabal, intrigue, machination, plot, scheme, collusion, connivance, treason, treachery, sedition. To form a plan for. v. plot, design, scheme, devise, draw up, conspire, intrigue, plan. To arouse the interest and attention of. v. interest, engross, absorb, attract, appeal, draw in, engage, excite, fascinate, intrigue, pique, turn on (slang), get one going, tantalize, titillate. Antonyms: bore, turn off. To work out a plan to do something illegal or immoral. v. scheme, cabal, collude, connive, conspire, intrigue, machinate, mastermind, plot, contrive. To arouse expectations by keeping out of reach. v. tantalize, tease, tempt, taunt, titillate, lead on, whet the appetite, intrigue. Antonyms: satisfy, gratify.

intrinsically adv. Internally; in its nature; essentially; really; truly. A lie is a thing absolutely and intrinsically evil. – South. Of or relating to the essential nature of a thing; inherent.

intrudes v. 1. intrude, irrupt – (enter uninvited; "They intruded on our dinner party"; "She irrupted into our sitting room") 2. trespass, intrude – (enter unlawfully on someone's property; "Don't trespass on my land!") 3. intrude, obtrude – (thrust oneself in as if by force; "The colors don't intrude on the viewer")

intrusion n. 1. invasion, encroachment, intrusion – (any entry into an area not previously occupied; “an invasion of tourists”; “an invasion of locusts”) 2. intrusion – (entrance by force or without permission or welcome) 3. intrusion – (the forcing of molten rock into fissures or between strata of an earlier rock formation) 4. intrusion – (rock produced by an intrusive process) 5. trespass, encroachment, violation, intrusion, usurpation – (entry to another's property without right or permission)

intrusted v. To deliver (something) to another in trust; to deliver to (another) something in trust; to commit or surrender (something) to another with a certain confidence regarding his care, use, or disposal of it; as, to intrust a servant with one”s money or intrust money or goods to a servant. Syn: To commit; consign; confide. Variant of entrust.

invalidating v. To make or render invalid; nullify. To weaken or lessen the force of; to destroy the authority of; to render of no force or effect; to overthrow; as, to invalidate an agreement or argument.

inveigled v. 1. To win over by coaxing, flattery, or artful talk. 2. To obtain by cajolery: inveigled a free pass to museum. To lure by false representations or other deceit “whoever unlawfully…inveigles, decoys, kidnaps, abducts, or carries away and holds for ransom or reward or otherwise any person…shall be punished by imprisonment” —U.S. Code To lead astray as if blind; to persuade to something evil by deceptive arts or flattery; to entice; to insnare; to seduce; to wheedle, cajole, palaver, blarney, coax, sweet-talk – (influence or urge by urging, caressing, or flattering; “He inveigled her into going along”) (“Yet have they many baits and guileful spells To inveigle and invite the unwary sense.” Milton)

irrevocable adj. (vs. revocable), irrevokable – (impossible to retract or revoke; “firm and irrevocable is my doom”- Shakespeare)

jeopardy n. Exposure to death, loss, or injury; hazard; danger. There came down a storm of wind on the lake; and they were filled with water, and were in jeopardy. – Luke 8: 23. Look to thyself, thou art in jeopardy. – Shak. Syn: Danger; peril; hazard; risk.

jurisdiction n. 1. Authority or control: islands under U.S. jurisdiction; a bureau with jurisdiction over Native American affairs. 2. The extent of authority or control: a family matter beyond the school's jurisdiction. 3. The territorial range of authority or control.

kindred adj. 1. Of the same ancestry or family: kindred clans. Having a similar or related origin, nature, or character: kindred emotions. Related; congenial; of the like nature or properties; as, kindred souls; kindred skies; kindred propositions. True to the kindred points of heaven and home. – Wordsworth.

legion adj. Constituting a large number; multitudinous. A great number; a vast multitude [syn: horde, host] Where one sin has entered, legions will force their way through the same breach. (Rom. Antiq.) A body of foot soldiers and cavalry consisting of different numbers at different periods, – from about four thousand to about six thousand men, – the cavalry being about one tenth. A regiment of the Roman army, the number of men composing which differed at different times. It originally consisted of three thousand men, but in the time of Christ consisted of six thousand, exclusive of horsemen, who were in number a tenth of the foot-men. The word is used (Matt. 26:53; Mark 5:9) to express simply a great multitude. (Easton's Bible Dictionary)

legions n. 1. (Military). A large military unit trained for combat; an army. The major unit of the Roman army consisting of 3,000 to 6,000 infantry troops and 100 to 200 cavalry troops. A regiment of the Roman army, the number of men composing which differed at different times. It originally consisted of three thousand men, but in the time of Christ consisted of six thousand, exclusive of horsemen, who were in number a tenth of the foot-men. 2. A large number; a multitude. The word is used (Matt. 26:53; Mark 5:9) to express simply a great multitude. (Easton's Bible Dictionary).

let 1. To give permission or opportunity to; allow: I let them borrow the car. The inheritance let us finally buy a house. 2. To cause to; make: Let the news be known. 3. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a command, request, or proposal: Let's finish the job! Let x equal y. 4. Used as an auxiliary in the imperative to express a warning or threat: Just let her try! 5. To permit to enter, proceed, or depart: let the dog in. 6. To release from or as if from confinement: let the air out of the balloon; let out a yelp. 7. To rent or lease: let rooms. 8. To award, especially after bids have been submitted: let the construction job to a new firm.

liaison n. A close relationship, connection, or link. 1. An instance or a means of communication between different groups or units of an organization, especially in the armed forces. 2. One that maintains communication: served as the President's liaison with Congress.

liberation (lib-rashn) n. 1. The act of liberating or the state of being liberated. 2. The act or process of trying to achieve equal rights and status. --lib'er-a'tion-ist n. Extrication from danger or confinement : rescue, deliverance, rescuing, saving, recovery, liberation, freeing, release.

license n. Deviation from normal rules, practices, or methods in order to achieve a certain end or effect. Latitude of action, especially in behavior or speech. To give or yield permission to or for. To grant a license to or for; authorize.

literal adj. 1. Being in accordance with, conforming to, or upholding the exact or primary meaning of a word or words. 2. Word for word; verbatim: a literal translation. 3. Avoiding exaggeration, metaphor, or embellishment; factual; prosaic: a literal description; a literal mind. 4. Consisting of, using, or expressed by letters: literal notation. 5. Conforming or limited to the simplest, nonfigurative, or most obvious meaning of a word or words.

literally adv. 1. According to the primary and natural import of words; not figuratively; as, a man and his wife can not be literally one flesh. 2. With close adherence to words; word by word. In a literal manner; word for word: translated the Greek passage literally. In a literal or strict sense: Don't take my remarks literally. So wild and ungovernable a poet can not be translated literally. – Dryden. 1. (in a literal sense; "literally translated"; "he said so literally") 2. virtually – ((intensifier before a figurative expression) without exaggeration; "our eyes were literally pinned to TV during the Gulf war").

lodgment n. A lodging place; a room. [Obs.] An accumulation or collection of something deposited in a place or remaining at rest. (Military) The occupation and holding of a position, as by a besieging party; an instrument thrown up in a captured position; as, to effect a lodgment.

logic n. 1. The study of the principles of reasoning, especially of the structure of propositions as distinguished from their content and of method and validity in deductive reasoning. 2. A system of reasoning: Aristotle's logic. A mode of reasoning: By that logic, we should sell the company tomorrow. The formal, guiding principles of a discipline, school, or science. 3. Valid reasoning: Your paper lacks the logic to prove your thesis. 4. The relationship between elements and between an element and the whole in a set of objects, individuals, principles, or events: There's a certain logic to the motion of rush-hour traffic. 5. Computer Science. The non-arithmetic operations performed by a computer, such as sorting, comparing, and matching, that involve yes-no decisions. Computer circuitry. Graphic representation of computer circuitry. [Middle English, from Old French logique, from Latin logica, from Greek logike (tekhne), (art) of reasoning, logic, feminine of logikos, of reasoning, from logos, reason. leg.] A line of reasoning: argument, defense, apologia, apology, case, logic, plea, rationale. Logical and methodical reasoning: ratiocination, induction, deduction, logic, dialectics, analysis, argument, syllogistic reasoning, inductive reasoning.

logical adj. 1. Of, relating to, in accordance with, or of the nature of logic. 2. Based on earlier or otherwise known statements, events, or conditions; reasonable: Rain was a logical expectation, given the time of year. 3. Reasoning or capable of reasoning in a clear and consistent manner. log'ical'ity (kalite). or log'icalness n. log'ically adv. SYNONYM: logical, analytic, ratiocinative, rational. The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "capable of or reflecting the capability for correct and valid reasoning": a logical mind; an analytic thinker; the ratiocinative process; a rational being. ANTONYM: illogical Of, relating to, or resembling syllogism. adj. syllogistic, deductive, logical, syllogistical.

long-suffering adj. patiently enduring continual wrongs or trouble or difficulties; “an enduring disposition”; “a long-suffering and uncomplaining wife” [syn: enduring] n : patient endurance of pain or unhappiness [syn: long-sufferance] Patiently enduring wrongs or n. Patient endurance. n. Bearing injuries or provocation for a long time; patient; not easily provoked. The Lord God, merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abundant in goodness and truth. – Ex. xxxiv. 6. Long patience of offense. Despisest thou the riches of his goodness and forbearance and long-suffering? – Rom. ii. 4.

luminosity n : the quality of being luminous; emitting or reflecting light; “its luminosity is measured relative to that of our sun” [syn: brightness, brightness level, luminance, luminousness, light] Exceptional brightness and clarity: radiance, splendor, brightness, brilliance, effulgence, incandescence, luminescence, luminosity, luminousness, refulgence. Antonyms: dullness, darkness, murkiness, dimness. The act of shedding light or the light that is shed: illumination, brightness, fluorescence, glow, incandescence, lambency, lighting, luminosity, phosphorescence, radiance.

luminous adj. 1. Emitting light, especially emitting self-generated light. 2. Full of light; illuminated, bright. 3. Easily comprehended; clear: luminous prose. Enlightened and intelligent; inspiring: luminous ideas. Shining; emitting or reflecting light; brilliant; bright; as, the is a luminous body; a luminous color. Fire burneth wood, making it . . . luminous. – Bacon. The mountains lift . . . their lofty and luminous heads. – Longfellow. 2. Illuminated; full of light; bright; as, many candles made the room luminous. Up the staircase moved a luminous space in the darkness. – Longfellow. 3. Enlightened; intelligent; also, clear; intelligible; as, a luminous mind. “ Luminous eloquence.” – Macaulay. “ A luminous statement.” – Brougham. Syn: Lucid; clear; shining; perspicuous.

magnificent adj. 1. Splendid in appearance; grand: a magnificent palace. 2. Grand or noble in thought or deed; exalted. 3. Outstanding of its kind; superlative: a magnificent place for sailing. grand. [Middle English, from Old French, from magnificence, splendor, from Latin magnificentia, from magnificus, magnificent.] magnif'icently adv. Splendid in size and appearance. adj. grand, imposing, impressive, august, noble, lordly, princely, magnific, grandiose, spectacular, magnificent, majestic, stately, regal, royal, awe-inspiring, awesome (informal), breathtaking, glorious, sumptuous, luxurious, resplendent, opulent. Antonyms: homely, plainlooking, humble, unsightly, ugly, squalid, ignoble, ordinary.

majestic adj. Having or showing lofty dignity or nobility; stately, grand. Possessing or exhibiting majesty; of august dignity, stateliness, or imposing grandeur; lofty; noble; grand. “The majestic world.” – Shak. The least portions must be of the epic kind; all must be grave, majestic, and sublime. – Dryden. Splendid in size and appearance. adj. grand, imposing, impressive, august, noble, lordly, princely, magnific, grandiose, spectacular, magnificent, majestic, stately, regal, royal, awe-inspiring, awesome (informal), breathtaking, glorious, sumptuous, luxurious, resplendent, opulent. Antonyms: homely, plain-looking, humble, unsightly, ugly, squalid, ignoble, ordinary. Of or relating to a monarch or monarchy. adj. royal, imperial, kingly, majestic, princely, queenly, regal, regnant, sovereign, monarchic, monarchical. Describing a scenic view. adj. beautiful, spectacular, appealing, arresting, attractive, beauteous, breathtaking, exotic, majestic, panoramic, picturesque, pretty.

mandate n. 1. An authoritative command or instruction. 2. A command or an authorization given by a political electorate to its representative. 3. A commission from the League of Nations authorizing a member nation to administer a territory. A region under such administration. 4. Law. An order issued by a superior court or an official to a lower court. A contract by which one party agrees to perform services for another without payment. v. tr. mandated, mandating, mandates. 1. To assign (a colony or territory) to a specified nation under a mandate. 2. To make mandatory, as by law; decree or require: mandated desegregation of public schools. [Latin mandatum, from neuter past participle of mandare, to order. man2.] man'da'tor n. An obligatory directive: command, behest, bidding, charge, dictate, injunction, mandate, order, ultimatum, edict, decree, decretal Roman Catholic Church. Authoritative direction for conduct, or a system of such rules: law, code, commandment, regulation, mandate, edict, ordinance, act, bill, bylaw, canon, rule. To prescribe expressly and with authority. v. dictate, decree, charge, command, demand, call the shots, bid, direct, enjoin, impose, instruct, ordain, order, prescribe, proclaim, rule, lay down the law, mandate.

mandates n. An authoritative command or instruction. Documents giving an official instruction or command. 2. The commission that is given to a government and its policies through an electoral victory.

manifest adj. Clearly apparent to the sight or understanding; obvious. apparent. v.tr. manifested, manifesting, manifests. 1. To show or demonstrate plainly; reveal. 2. To be evidence of; prove. [Middle English manifeste, from Old French, from Latin manufestus, manifestus, caught in the act, blatant, obvious.] adj. obvious, absolute, barefaced, blatant, clear, downright, evident, indisputable, manifest, noticeable, open, outright, patent, plain. Antonyms: inconspicuous. Easy to notice. adj. apparent, conspicuous, discernible, evident, manifest, noticeable, observable, perceptible, unmistakable, visible. Antonyms: inconspicuous, imperceptible. “Mercedes... manifested the chaotic abandonment of hysteria” (Jack London). 2. To be evidence of; prove. 3. To make evident or certain by showing or displaying; manifesting the intent to make a gift. [Middle English manifeste, from Old French, from Latin manufestus, manifestus, caught in the act, blatant, obvious.]

manifestation n. 1. The act of manifesting. The state of being manifested. 2. An indication of the existence, reality, or presence of something: A high fever is an early manifestation of the disease. 3. One of the forms in which someone or something, such as a person, a divine being, or an idea, is revealed. The materialized form of a spirit. 4. A public demonstration, usually of a political nature. The act of coming into view: appearance, materialization, emergence, manifestation, surfacing, coming, showing up, turning up, advent. Antonyms: disappearance. A physical entity typifying an abstraction: embodiment, incarnation, manifestation, personification, reification. 1. manifestation – (a clear appearance; "a manifestation of great emotion") 2. manifestation – (a manifest indication of the existence or presence or nature of some person or thing; "a manifestation of disease") 3. materialization, materialisation, manifestation – [an appearance in bodily form (as of a disembodied spirit)] 4. expression, manifestation, reflection, reflexion – (expression without words; "tears are an expression of grief"; "the pulse is a reflection of the heart's condition") 5. demonstration, manifestation – (a public display of group feelings (usually of a political nature); "there were violent demonstrations against the war")

manifestations n.pl. 1. The act of manifesting; the state of being manifested. 2. An indication of the existence, reality, or presence of something: A high fever is an early manifestation of the disease. 3. a. One of the forms in which someone or something, such as a person, a divine being, or an idea, is revealed. b. The materialized form of a spirit. 4. A public demonstration, usually of a political nature.

manifested manifest tr.v. manifested, manifesting, manifests 1. To show or demonstrate plainly; reveal: “Mercedes... manifested the chaotic abandonment of hysteria” (Jack London). 2. To be evidence of; prove. 3. To make evident or certain by showing or displaying; manifesting the intent to make a gift. [Middle English manifeste, from Old French, from Latin manufestus, manifestus, caught in the act, blatant, obvious.]

manifold (manfold) adj. 1. Many and varied; of many kinds; multiple: our manifold failings. 2.Having many features or forms: manifold intelligence. 3. Being such for a variety of reasons: a manifold traitor. 4. Consisting of or operating several devices of one kind at the same time. n.1. A whole composed of diverse elements. 2. One of several copies. 3. A pipe or chamber having multiple apertures for making connections. 4. Mathematics. A topologic space or surface. v. tr. manifolded, manifolding, manifolds. 1. To make several copies of, as with carbon paper. 2. To make manifold; multiply. [Middle English, from Old English manigfeald: manig, many + feald, fald, fold.] Various in kind or quality; many in number; numerous; multiplied; complicated. O Lord, how manifold are thy works! – Ps. 104:24. I know your manifold transgressions. – Amos 5:12. 2. Exhibited at divers times or in various ways; – used to qualify nouns in the singular number. “The manifold wisdom of God.” – (Eph. 3:10) “The manifold grace of God.” – (1 Pet. 4:10) 3. Being such for a variety of reasons: a manifold traitor.

manipulate v. To move, arrange, operate, or control by the hands or by mechanical means, especially in a skillful manner: She manipulated the lights to get just the effect she wanted. To influence or manage shrewdly or deviously: He manipulated public opinion in his favor. To tamper with or falsify for personal gain: tried to manipulate stock prices. manipulation n.

mar v. marred, mar-ring, mars. 1. To inflict damage, especially disfiguring damage, on. 2. To impair the soundness, perfection, or integrity of; spoil; injure. n. A disfiguring mark; a blemish. [Middle English merren, from Old English mierran, merran, to impede.]

marvelous adj. Exciting wonder or surprise; astonishing; wonderful. This is the Lord's doing; it is marvelous in our eyes. – (Ps. cxiii. 23) 2. Partaking of the character of miracle, or supernatural power; incredible; miraculous; supernatural. The marvelous fable includes whatever is supernatural, and especially the machines of the gods. – Pope. The marvelous, that which exceeds natural power, or is preternatural; that which is wonderful; – opposed to the probable. 3. Of the highest or best kind or quality; first-rate: has a marvelous collection of rare books. Syn: Wonderful; astonishing; surprising; strange; improbable; incredible.

materialization materialize (m-tire--liz) v. ma-te-ri-al-ized, ma-te-ri-al-iz-ing, ma-te-ri-al-iz-es.v. tr. 1. To cause to become real or actual: By building the house, we materialized a dream. 2. To cause to become materialistic: "Inequality has the natural and necessary effect...of materializing our upper class, vulgarizing our middle class, and brutalizing our lower class" (Matthew Arnold). v. intr. 1. To assume material or effective form: Their support on the eastern flank did not materialize. 2. To take physical form or shape. 3. To appear, especially suddenly. materialization (--li-zashn). n. --ma-te'ri-al-iz'er n. USAGE NOTES: In its original senses materialize is used intransitively to mean "to assume material form," as in Marley's ghost materialized before Scrooge's eyes, or transitively to mean "to cause to assume material form," as in Disney materialized his dream in a plot of orchard land in Orange County. But these uses are probably less common nowadays than two extended senses of the intransitive sense of the verb. In the first the meaning is roughly "to appear suddenly," as in No sooner had we set the menu down than a waiter materialized at our table. Some critics have labeled this use incorrect, but the criticism may suggest an overliteralism; used in this way, the verb has the sense "to appear as if by magic." Materialize also means "to take effective shape, come into existence," particularly as applied to things or events that have been foreseen or anticipated: The promised subsidies never materialized. It was thought the community would oppose the measure, but no new objections materialized. This usage has been criticized, but it is well established in reputable writing and follows a familiar pattern of metaphoric extension. The same logic that allows us to say The plans did not materialize allows us to use equivalent and unobjectionable paraphrases with expressions such as take form and take shape. ma-te-ri-al-ize (m-tire--liz). To begin to appear or develop. v. emerge, arise, dawn, form, germinate, grow, rise, start, unfold, materialize, come up. Antonyms: disappear. To come into view. v. appear, materialize, break through, emerge, loom, peep, pop up, show, show up, make an appearance, meet the eye, surface. Antonyms: disappear, evaporate. To make real or actual. v. materialize, be realized, become an actuality, become real, actualize, bring to pass, carry into effect, carry out, fulfill, complete, consummate, bring about, effectuate, produce. To give a concrete form to an abstract quality. v. embody, externalize, personalize, incarnate, materialize, objectify, personify, substantiate, manifest, actualize, exemplify. Antonyms: disembody. To take shape or fall into place. v. crystallize, jell, materialize, come together.

meager adj. 1. Deficient in quantity, fullness, or extent; scanty. 2. Deficient in richness, fertility, or vigor; feeble; destitute of richness, fertility, strength, or the like; defective in quantity, or poor in quality; poor; barren: the meager soil of an eroded plain. 3. Destitute of, or having little, flesh; lean. Meager were his looks; Sharp misery had worn him to the bones. – Shak. 4. Scanty in ideas; wanting strength of diction or affluence of imagery. Of secular habits and meager religious belief. – I. Taylor. His education had been but meager. – Motley. Syn: Thin; lean; lank; gaunt; starved; hungry; poor; emaciated; scanty; barren.

meagerly adv. meager (vs. ample), meagre, meagerly – (deficient in amount or quality or extent; “meager resources”; “meager fare”)

mechanist n. – (a philosopher who subscribes to the doctrine of mechanism, the philosophical theory that all phenomena can be explained in terms of physical or biological causes)

mediator n. One that mediates, especially one that reconciles differences between disputants. One that works to effect reconciliation, settlement, or compromise between parties at variance; one who interposes between parties at variance for the purpose of reconciling them; hence, an intercessor. For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus. --1 Tim. ii. 5.

meditate v. To contemplate; to keep the mind fixed upon; to study. “Blessed is the man that doth meditate good things.” – Ecclus. xiv. 20. To reflect deeply on a subject; think intently and at length, as for spiritual purposes; “He is meditating in his study” To keep the mind in a state of contemplation; to dwell on anything in thought; to think seriously; to muse; to cogitate; to reflect. To think or reflect, especially in a calm and deliberate manner. In his law doth he meditate day and night. – Ps. i. 2. [syn: study, contemplate]

medley n. 1. An often jumbled assortment; a mixture: "That night he dreamed he was traveling in a foreign country, only it seemed to be a medley of all the countries he'd ever been to and even some he hadn't" (Anne Tyler). 2. Music. An arrangement made from a series of melodies, often from various sources. [Middle English medlee, from Anglo-Norman medlee, meddling, from past participle of medler, to meddle.] potpourri, pastiche – (a musical composition consisting of a series of songs or other musical pieces from various sources).

mercy n. pl. mercies. 1. Compassionate treatment, especially of those under one's power; clemency. 2. A disposition to be kind and forgiving: a heart full of mercy. 3. Something for which to be thankful; a blessing: It was a mercy that no one was hurt. 4. Alleviation of distress; relief: Distributing food among the homeless was an act of mercy. idiom. at the mercy of. Without any protection against; helpless before: drifting in an open boat, at the mercy of the elements. [Middle English, from Old French merci, from Medieval Latin merces, from Latin, reward.] Syn: mercy, leniency, lenity, clemency, charity These nouns mean kind, forgiving, or sympathetic and humane treatment of or disposition toward others. Mercy is compassionate forbearance: “We hand folks over to God's mercy, and show none ourselves” (George Eliot). Leniency and lenity imply mildness, gentleness, and often a tendency to reduce the severity or harshness of punishment: “When you have gone too far to recede, do not sue [appeal] to me for leniency” (Charles Dickens). “His Majesty gave many marks of his great lenity, often . . . endeavoring to extenuate your crimes” (Jonathan Swift). Clemency is mercy shown by one in a position of authority or power and especially by one charged with administering justice: The judge believed in clemency for youthful offenders. Charity is goodwill and benevolence, especially as it manifests itself in kindly forbearance in judging others: “But how shall we expect charity towards others, when we are uncharitable to ourselves?” (Thomas Browne). The act or an instance of forgiving: forgiveness, absolution, clemency, mercy, amnesty, condonation, excuse, indulgence, overlooking, pardon, remission, shrift. Antonyms: unforgiveness, condemnation.

metamorphoses n.pl. metamorphosis n. 1. Change of form, or structure; transformation. 2. (Biol.) A change in the form or function of a living organism, by a natural process of growth or development; as, the metamorphosis of the yolk into the embryo, of a tadpole into a frog, or of a bud into a blossom. Especially, that form of sexual reproduction in which an embryo undergoes a series of marked changes of external form, as the chrysalis stage, pupa stage, etc., in insects. In these intermediate stages sexual reproduction is usually impossible, but they ultimately pass into final and sexually developed forms, from the union of which organisms are produced which pass through the same cycle of changes. See Transformation. 3. (Physiol.) The change of material of one kind into another through the agency of the living organism; metabolism. Vegetable metamorphosis (Bot.), the doctrine that flowers are homologous with leaf buds, and that the floral organs are transformed leaves.

meted out adj Given out in portions [syn: apportioned, dealt out, doled out, parceled out] mete tr.v. meted, meting, metes 1. To distribute by or as if by measure; allot: mete out justice. 2. Archaic. To measure. [Middle English meten, from Old English metan.]

millenniums n. 1. millennium – (a span of 1000 years) 2. millennium – ((New Testament) in Revelations it is foretold that those faithful to Jesus will reign with Jesus over the earth for a thousand years; the meaning of these words have been much debated; some denominations (e.g. Jehovah's Witnesses) expect it to be a thousand years of justice and peace and happiness) 3. millennium – (the 1000th anniversary (or the celebration of it)

mindal (not in dictionary) Having to do with the level of mind. mind n. 1. The human consciousness that originates in the brain and is manifested especially in thought, perception, emotion, will, memory, and imagination. 2. The collective conscious and unconscious processes in a sentient organism that direct and influence mental and physical behavior. 3. The principle of intelligence; the spirit of consciousness regarded as an aspect of reality. 4. The faculty of thinking, reasoning, and applying knowledge: Follow your mind, not your heart. 5. A person of great mental ability: the great minds of the century. 6. Individual consciousness, memory, or recollection: I'll bear the problem in mind. A person or group that embodies certain mental qualities: the medical mind; the public mind. The thought processes characteristic of a person or group; psychological makeup: the criminal mind. 7. Opinion or sentiment: He changed his mind when he heard all the facts. 8. Desire or inclination: She had a mind to spend her vacation in the desert. 9. Focus of thought; attention: I can't keep my mind on work. 10. A healthy mental state; sanity: losing one's mind. 11. Mind. Christian Science. The Deity regarded as the perfect intelligence ruling over all of divine creation. v. minded, minding, minds. v. tr. 1. To bring (an object or idea) to mind; remember. 2. To become aware of; notice. Upper Southern U. S. To have in mind as a goal or purpose; intend. 3. To heed in order to obey: The children mind well. 4. To attend to: Mind closely what I tell you. 5. To be careful about: Mind the icy sidewalk! 6. To care about; be concerned about. To object to; dislike: doesn't mind doing the chores. 7. To take care or charge of; look after. v. intr. 1. To take notice; give heed. 2. To behave obediently. 3. To be concerned or troubled; care: “Not minding about bad food has become a national obsession” (Times Literary Supplement) . 4. To be cautious or careful. [Middle English minde, from Old English gemynd. men.] mind'er n.

minister to v. To attend to the wants and needs of others. To furnish or apply; to afford; to supply; to administer. He that ministereth seed to the sower. – (2 Cor. ix.10) To act as a servant, attendant, or agent; to attend and serve; to perform service in any office, sacred or secular. The Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister. – (Matt. xx. 28) 2. To supply or to things needful; esp., to supply consolation or remedies. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased? – Shak.

mode n 1: how something is done or how it happens; "her dignified manner"; "his rapid manner of talking"; "their nomadic mode of existence"; "in the characteristic New York style"; "a lonely way of life"; "in an abrasive fashion" [syn: manner, style, way, fashion] 2: a particular functioning condition or arrangement; "switched from keyboard to voice mode" 3: a classification of propositions on the basis of whether they claim necessity or possibility or impossibility [syn: modality] 4: verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker [syn: mood, modality] 5: any of various fixed orders of the various diatonic notes within an octave [syn: musical mode] 6: the most frequent value of a random variable [syn: modal value]

modifications n. The act or result of modifying something; a change in an organism that is not inherited and that is caused by the influence of its environment. Any of the changes in an organism that are caused by environment or activity and are not genetically transmissable to offspring. The act of modifying or the condition of being modified. A result of modifying. A small alteration, adjustment, or limitation.

modified adj. 1: Changed in form or character; alter. “their modified stand made the issue more acceptable” To make less extreme, severe, or strong: refused to modify her stand on the issue. To change somewhat the form or qualities of; to alter somewhat; as, to modify a contrivance adapted to some mechanical purpose; to modify the terms of a contract. 2. To limit or reduce in extent or degree; to moderate; to qualify; to lower. Of his grace He modifies his first severe decree. – Dryden.

mortal adj. 1. Liable or subject to death. 2. Of or relating to humankind; human: the mortal limits of understanding. 3. Of, relating to, or accompanying death: mortal throes. 4. Causing death; fatal: a mortal wound. Synonyms at fatal. 5. Fighting or fought to the death; unrelenting: a mortal enemy; a mortal attack. 6. Of great intensity or severity; dire: mortal terror. 7. Conceivable: no mortal reason for us to go. 8. Used as an intensive: a mortal fool. adv. A member of the human race: human, earthling, human being, living soul, Homo sapiens, mortal, person. Of or relating to the body. adj. bodily, corporeal, somatic, physical, corporal, carnal, mortal. Antonyms: noncorporeal. Causing or capable of causing death or total destruction. adj. fatal, annihilating, baleful, baneful, deadly, devastating, fateful, killing, lethal, malignant, mortal, murderous, pernicious, pestilent, poisonous, ruinous, toxic, venomous. Of, relating to, or resembling human beings. adj. human, android, anthropoid, anthropomorphic, hominid, hominoid, humanoid, manlike, mortal. Antonyms: unhuman. Ending in death. adj. deadly, fatal, incurable, inoperable, terminal, lethal, mortal, final.

mortals n.pl. Human beings. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin mortalis, from mors, mort, death. mer.] mor'tally

motivation n. 1. The act or process of motivating. The state of being motivated. 2. Something that motivates; an inducement or incentive. mo'tiva'tional adj. mo'tiva'tionally adv. Something that incites or rouses to action: stimulus, catalyst, fillip, goad, incitement, instigation, motivation, prod, push, spur, stimulant, provocation, activator, energizer, excitant. A determination to complete a goal: motivation, willpower, desire, drive, enterprise, fire, resolve, urge, will, zeal. Something that influences a decision or moves to action: motive, cause, consideration, motivation, reason.

mustered v. tr. 1. To call (troops) together, as for inspection. 2. To cause to come together; gather: Bring all the volunteers you can muster. 3. To call forth; summon up: mustering up her strength for the ordeal. To collect and display; to assemble, as troops for parade, inspection, exercise, or the like. 2. Hence: To summon together; to enroll in service; to get together. “Mustering all its force.” – Cowper. “All the gay feathers he could muster.” – L'Estrange. To muster troops into service (Mil.), to inspect and enter troops on the muster roll of the army.

myriad adj. 1. Constituting a very large, indefinite number; innumerable: the myriad fish in the ocean. 2. Composed of numerous diverse elements or facets: the myriad life of the metropolis. n. 1. A vast number: the myriads of bees in the hive. 2. Archaic. Ten thousand. [Greek murias, muriad, ten thousand, from murios, countless.] Myria Myriad.] —> A prefix, esp. in the metric system, indicating ten thousand, ten thousand times; as, myriameter. Myriad n. [Gr. fr. numberless, pl. ten thousand: cf. F. myriade.] 1. The number of ten thousand; ten thousand persons or things. 2. An immense number; a very great many; an indefinitely large number. Myriad a. Consisting of a very great, but indefinite, number; as, myriad stars.

myriads adj. 1. Constituting a very large, indefinite number; innumerable: the myriad fish in the ocean. 2. Composed of numerous diverse elements or facets: the myriad life of the metropolis.

mysteriously adj. 1. Of, relating to, or being a mystery: mysterious and infinite truths. 2. Simultaneously arousing wonder and inquisitiveness, and eluding explanation or comprehension: a mysterious visitor; mysterious conduct. Synonyms: mysterious, esoteric, arcane, occult, inscrutable. These adjectives mean beyond human power to explain or understand. Something mysterious arouses wonder and inquisitiveness: “The sea lies all about us.... In its mysterious past it encompasses all the dim origins of life” (Rachel Carson.) What is esoteric is mysterious because only a select group knows and understands it: a compilation of esoteric philosophical essays. Arcane applies to what is hidden from general knowledge: arcane economic theories. Occult suggests knowledge reputedly gained only by secret, magical, or supernatural means: an occult rite. Something that is inscrutable cannot be fathomed by means of investigation or scrutiny: “It is not for me to attempt to fathom the inscrutable workings of Providence” (Earl of Birkenhead).

mystify (mist-fi) v. tr. mys-ti-fied, mys-ti-fy-ing, mys-ti-fies. 1. To confuse or puzzle mentally; bewilder. See Synonyms at puzzle. 2. To make obscure or mysterious. [French mystifier : mystere, mystery (from Latin mysterium. MYSTERY) + -fier, -fy.] --mys'ti-fi'er n. --mys'ti-fy'ing-ly adv. To escape the understanding or grasp of. v. stump, elude, mystify, baffle, dumbfound, perplex, foil, stymie, befog.

nature n. 1. The material world and its phenomena. 2. The forces and processes that produce and control all the phenomena of the material world: the laws of nature. 3. The world of living things and the outdoors: the beauties of nature. 4. A primitive state of existence, untouched and uninfluenced by civilization or artificiality: couldn't tolerate city life anymore and went back to nature. 5. Theology. Humankind's natural state as distinguished from the state of grace. 6. A kind or sort: confidences of a personal nature. type. 7. The essential characteristics and qualities of a person or thing: “She was only strong and sweet and in her nature when she was really deep in trouble” (Gertrude Stein). 8. The fundamental character or disposition of a person; temperament: “Strange natures made a brotherhood of ill” (Percy Bysshe Shelley). 9. The natural or real aspect of a person, place, or thing. disposition. 10. The processes and functions of the body. [Middle English, essential properties of a thing, from Old French, from Latin natura, from natus, past participle of nasci, to be born. gen.] A person's emotional, intellectual, and moral qualities: personality, humor, cast, character, complexion, constitution, disposition, identity, makeup, nature, persona, spirit, temperament. The totality of all existing things: universe, cosmos, creation, existence, life, macrocosm, nature, world.

Nebadon (neb' ah dahn). The name of our local universe, which is governed by our Creator Son, Michael, together with his Creative Mother Spirit consort. Salvington is the headquarters sphere. (1,5)[0:0.5].

neural adj. Of or relating to a nerve or the nervous system. 1. Pertaining to a nerve or to the nerves. 2. Situated in the region of the spinal axis, as the neutral arch. [Origin: L. Neuralis, Gr. Neuron = nerve]

objectify v.tr. objectified, objectifying, objectifies. 1. To present (something or someone) as an object; depersonalize: "Because we have objectified animals, we are able to treat them impersonally" (Barry Lopez). 2. To impart reality to; make objective; externalize. objectification (fikashn). n. objec'tifi'er n. To give a concrete form to an abstract quality. v. embody, externalize, personalize, incarnate, materialize, objectify, personify, substantiate, manifest, actualize, exemplify. Antonyms: disembody.

oblivious adj. 1. oblivious (predicate), unmindful (predicate) – (followed by ‘to’ or ‘of’) lacking conscious awareness of; “oblivious of the mounting pressures for political reform”; “oblivious to the risks she ran”; “not unmindful of the heavy responsibility”) 2. forgetful, oblivious – (failing to keep in mind; “forgetful of her responsibilities”; “oblivious old age”)

omni- pref. A combining form denoting all, every, everywhere; as in omnipotent, all-powerful; omnipresent. The prefix "omni" is from the Latin "omnis" meaning "all." (The prefix "pan" has a similar usage but is descended from a Greek form which means, "all, wholly, entirely, altogether.")

omnificent All that happens is the result of a personal, volitional act of God; God personally does everything that is done; doing everything; all-doing; all-creating. From the Urantia papers: "God is truly omnipotent, but he is not omnificent -- he does not personally do all that is done." [118:6.1]

omnipotent Infinite or unlimited in power; almighty. Having full or absolute power or authority; having unlimited force or influence; exceedingly strong or mighty. From the Urantia papers: "To recognize Deity omnipotence is to enjoy security in your experience of cosmic citizenship, to possess assurance of safety in the long journey to Paradise. But to accept the fallacy of omnificence is to embrace the colossal error of Pantheism." [118:6.8]

omnipotence adj. Having unlimited or universal power, authority, or force; all-powerful. The state of being omnipotent; almighty power; hence, one who is omnipotent; the Deity. Unlimited power of a particular kind; as, love's omnipotence.

omnipresent Present at the same time in all places; everywhere present in all things and in all spaces. "Omnipresence is that attribute of God whereby he is said to be everywhere present. Traditionally this has meant 1) that God is not localized in time or space, 2) that his creativity and power are at work in everything that is. Most theologians have insisted that the term is to be understood qualitatively and not quantitatively. That is, just as 'eternity' does not refer to an unlimited time, neither does "omnipresence" refer to an indefinitely extended space. One contemporary definition is, 'The ability of divine love to maintain itself everywhere unhindered by limitations of space.'" (From V.A. Harvey's "A Handbook of Theological Terms"). This definition helps us grasp the Urantia papers' connotations of transcendence which are attached to the use of this word.
Present everywhere simultaneously; being present everywhere at once; present in all places at the same time; ubiquitous; being present everywhere at once; as, the omnipresent Jehovah. [syn: ubiquitous].

omnipresence adj. Present everywhere simultaneously. Presence in every place at the same time; unbounded or universal presence; ubiquity. His omnipresence fills Land, sea, and air, and every kind that lives. – Milton. The state of being everywhere at once (or seeming to be everywhere at once) [syn: ubiquity, ubiquitousness].

omniscient
adj. Having total knowledge; knowing everything: an omniscient deity. Knowing all things; all-knowing; infinite in knowledge; universal in knowledge. In classical theology this has been taken to mean that the divine knows the past, present, and future in one simple, timeless act of cognition.

omniscience n. The quality or state of being omniscient; having infinite knowledge; – an attribute peculiar to God. One having total knowledge. Omniscient God. Used with the.

optional adj. (vs. obligatory) – (possible but not necessary; left to personal choice)

ordain v.tr. ordained, ordaining, ordains. 1. To invest with ministerial or priestly authority; confer holy orders on. To authorize as a rabbi. 2. To prescribe expressly and with authority; to order by virtue of superior authority; decree or enact. 3. To prearrange unalterably; predestine: by fate ordained. dictate. [Middle English ordeinen, from Old French ordener, ordein, from Latin ordinare, to organize, appoint to office, from ordo, ordin, order. ar.] Syn. (To prescribe expressly and with authority) dictate, decree, charge, command, demand, call the shots, bid, direct, enjoin, impose, instruct, order, prescribe, proclaim, rule, lay down the law, mandate. (To admit formally into membership or office, as with ritual) initiate, ensconce, enthrone, inaugurate, induct, install, instate, invest, ordain, seat, swear in. (To put in force by legal authority) to authorize, decree, enact, institute, legislate, ratify, license, entitle. (To determine the future of) predestine, destine, fate, foreordain, ordain, predetermine, preordain.

ordained v. 1. ordain, enact – (order by virtue of superior authority; decree; "The King ordained the persecution and expulsion of the Jews"; "the legislature enacted this law in 1985") 2. ordain, consecrate, ordinate, order – (appoint to a clerical posts; "he was ordained in the Church") 3. ordain – (invest with ministerial or priestly authority; "The minister was ordained only last month")

organize (orgniz) v. organized, organizing, organizes. v. tr. 1. To put together into an orderly, functional, structured whole. 2. To arrange in a coherent form; systematize: organized her thoughts before speaking. To arrange in a desired pattern or structure: "The painting is organized about a young reaper enjoying his noonday rest" (William Carlos Williams). 3. To arrange systematically for harmonious or united action: organize a strike. arrange. 4. To establish as an organization: organize a club. found. To induce (employees) to form or join a labor union. To induce the employees of (a business or an industry) to form or join a union: organize a factory. v. intr. 1. To develop into or assume an organic structure. 2. To form or join an activist group, especially a labor union. [Middle English organisen, from Old French organiser, from Medieval Latin organizare, from Latin organum, tool, instrument.] organizer n. To form a strategy for. v. plan, organize, prepare, plot, concoct, lay plans, blueprint, draft, make arrangements, make preparations, think out, contrive, fabricate, design, frame, outline, block out, map out, scheme, cook up (informal). To plan and start to carry out. v. coordinate, organize, arrange, institute, launch, mount. To make or keep (an area) clean and orderly. v. clean, organize, reorganize, arrange, fix up, neaten, order, pick up, rearrange, straighten, sweep, tidy, unclutter, spruce up. Antonyms: clutter, disorganize, mess up. To arrange in a coherent form. v. systematize, organize, codify, design, form. Antonyms: disorganize, disorder. To put into a proper order, relationship, or sequence. v. arrange, array, order, organize, systematize, rank, class, classify, categorize, group, sort, codify, place, position, type, catalogue, alphabetize, graduate, index, size, grade, space, collate, configure, file, interfile, reorganize, reorder. Antonyms: disorder, disorganize, disarrange, jumble, disarray. To call together and prepare for action. v. marshal, muster, organize, rally. Antonyms: disperse.

overcontrol (over + control) control tr.v. -trolled -trolling -trols 1. To exercise authority or dominating influence over; direct; regulate. 2. To hold in restraint; check. 3. a. To verify or regulate (a scientific experiment) by conducting a parallel experiment or by comparing with some other standard. b. To verify (an account, for example) by using a duplicate register for comparison. -n. 1. Authority or ability to regulate, direct, or dominate. 2. A restraining act or influence; curb: price controls. 3. A standard of comparison for checking or verifying the results of an experiment. 4. controls An instrument or set of instruments used to operate, regulate, or guide a machine or vehicle. 5. A spirit presumed to act through a spiritualist medium. [ME countrollen < AN < OFr. contrarotulare < Med. Lat. controretulare, to check by duplicate register < contrarotulus, duplicate register : Lat. contra, against + Lat. rotulus, roll, dim. of rota, wheel.] controllability n. controllable adj.

overshadow v. tr. overshadowed, overshadowing, overshadows. 1. To cast a shadow over; darken or obscure. 2. To make insignificant by comparison; dominate. To surpass in power, importance, or influence. v. predominate, dominate, govern, loom large, overshadow, prevail, rule. To occupy the preeminent position in. v. dominate, domineer, have the upper hand, hold sway, overshadow, predominate, reign, rule, preponderate, prevail, govern, control. To be imminent. v. threaten, lower, impend, loom, menace, portend, overshadow, hang over. To rise above, especially so as to afford a view of. v. overlook, dominate, look down, overshadow, tower above. To make insignificant by comparison. v. outshine, dominate, eclipse, overshadow, show up, surpass, top, upstage. To become or cause to become dim or indistinct. v. cloud, mist, blur, haze, shadow, film, fog, becloud, bedim, befog, blear, adumbrate, obscure, fade, dull, gloom, screen, eclipse, obfuscate, overshadow, overcast. Antonyms: clear, reveal.

oversight n. 1. Management by overseeing the performance or operation of a person or group. Watchful care or management; supervision. Syn: superintendence; supervision; inspection. 2. An unintentional omission or mistake. Syn: overlooking; inadvertence; neglect; mistake; error; omission. 3. (Rare) Escape from an overlooked peril. “His fool-happy oversight.” – Spenser.

oversoul n. In New England transcendentalism, a spiritual essence or vital force in the universe in which all souls participate and that therefore transcends individual consciousness.

pagan n. heathen, infidel – (a person who does not acknowledge God)

panorama n. 1. A complete view in every direction. An unbroken view of an entire surrounding area. A picture presenting a view of objects in every direction, as from a central point. 2. A comprehensive presentation; a survey: a panorama of American literature. 3. A picture or series of pictures representing a continuous scene, often exhibited a part at a time by being unrolled and passed before the spectator. A picture representing scenes too extended to be beheld at once, and so exhibited a part at a time, by being unrolled, and made to pass continuously before the spectator. 4. A mental vision of a series of events. [syn: view, aspect, prospect, scene, vista] [syn: cyclorama, diorama]

pantheistic adj. 1. Identifying the Deity with the universe and its phenomena; belief in and worship of all gods. The doctrine that the universe, taken or conceived of as a whole, is God; the doctrine that there is no God but the combined force and laws which are manifested in the existing universe; cosmotheism. 2. Worship that admits or tolerates all gods.

paradox n. An assertion or sentiment seemingly contradictory, or opposed to common sense; that which in appearance or terms is absurd, but yet may be true in fact. (logic: a self-contradiction; "`I always lie' is a paradox because if it is true it must be false") 1. A seemingly contradictory statement that may nonetheless be true: the paradox that standing is more tiring than walking. 2. One exhibiting inexplicable or contradictory aspects: “The silence of midnight, to speak truly, though apparently a paradox, rung in my ears” (Mary Shelley). 3. An assertion that is essentially self-contradictory, though based on a valid deduction from acceptable premises.

paternity (p-turni-te) n.pl. pa-ter-ni-ties. 1. The state of being a father; fatherhood. 2. Descent on a father's side; paternal descent. 3. Authorship; origin. adj. Of or relating to a lawsuit brought by a woman attempting to establish that a particular man is the father of her child and so must provide the child with financial support: paternity case; paternity suit. [Middle English paternite, from Old French, from Late Latin paternitas, from Latin paternus, paternal.]

perchance adv. Perhaps; possibly, by chance; peradventure; through chance, “To sleep, perchance to dream.”

perfect (purfikt) adj. 1. Lacking nothing essential to the whole; complete of its nature or kind. 2. Being without defect or blemish: a perfect specimen. 3. Thoroughly skilled or talented in a certain field or area; proficient. 4. Completely suited for a particular purpose or situation: She was the perfect actress for the part. 5. Completely corresponding to a description, standard, or type: a perfect circle; a perfect gentleman. Accurately reproducing an original: a perfect copy of the painting. 6. Complete; thorough; utter: a perfect fool. 7. Pure; undiluted; unmixed: perfect red. 8. Excellent and delightful in all respects: a perfect day. 9. Botany. Having both stamens and pistils in the same flower; monoclinous. 10. Grammar. Of, relating to, or constituting a verb form expressing action completed prior to a fixed point of reference in time. 11. Music. Designating the three basic intervals of the octave, fourth, and fifth. Designating a cadence or chord progression from the dominant to the tonic at the end of a phrase or piece of music. n. 1. Grammar. The perfect tense. 2. A verb or verb form in the perfect tense.v. tr. per-fect-ed, per-fect-ing, per-fects (pr-fekt). To bring to perfection or completion. [Middle English perfit, from Old French parfit, from Latin perfectus, past participle of perficere, to finish : per-, per- + facere, to do.] --per-fect'er n. --per'fect-ness n. SYNONYM: perfect, consummate, faultless, flawless, impeccable The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "being wholly without flaw": a perfect diamond; a consummate performer; faultless logic; a flawless instrumental technique; speaks impeccable French. ANTONYM: imperfect. To fill in what is lacking and make perfect. v. complement, complete, fill out, round off, round out, supplement, perfect. To give a fine or gleaming finish to. v. sand, scrub, scour, rub, oil, wax, brush, refine, perfect, smooth, burnish, shine, buff, polish, gloss, glaze, sleek, slick. Antonyms: tarnish, discolor, corrode, erode. Of or conforming to a standard of perfection. adj.ideal, idealized, idyllic, Elysian, Edenic, empyrean, heavenly, paradisiac, paradisiacal, perfect, sublime, utopian, Arcadian. Free from error or fault. adj. correct, accurate, errorless, faultless, flawless, impeccable, perfect, unerring. Antonyms: error-ridden, flawed, imperfect. Complete in every respect; lacking nothing. adj. consummate, flawless, faultless, perfect, pristine, intact, undamaged, unimpaired. Antonyms: flawed, imperfect.

perfection (pr-fekshn) n. 1. The quality or condition of being perfect. 2. The act or process of perfecting: Perfection of the invention took years. 3. A person or thing considered to be perfect. 4. An instance of excellence. The act of concluding, perfecting, or making entire : consummation, completion, perfection, culmination, completing, finishing, concluding, fulfillment.

perpetual adj. 1. Lasting for eternity. 2. Continuing or lasting for an indefinitely long time. 3. Instituted to be in effect or have tenure for an unlimited duration: a treaty of perpetual friendship. 4. Continuing without interruption. Neverceasing; continuing forever or for an unlimited time; unfailing; everlasting; continuous. Unto the kingdom of perpetual night. – Shak. Perpetual feast of nectared sweets. – Milton.

perplexity n. (trouble or confusion resulting from complexity)

personal (purs-nl) adj. 1. Of or relating to a particular person; private: "Like their personal lives, women's history is fragmented, interrupted" (Elizabeth Janeway). 2. Done, made, or performed in person: a personal appearance. Done to or for or directed toward a particular person: a personal favor. 3. Concerning a particular person and his or her private business, interests, or activities; intimate: I have something personal to tell you. 4. Aimed pointedly at the most intimate aspects of a person, especially in a critical or hostile manner: an uncalled-for, highly personal remark. Tending to make remarks, or be unduly questioning, about another's affairs: She always becomes personal in an argument. 5. Of or relating to the body or physical being: personal cleanliness. 6. Relating to or having the nature of a person or self-conscious being: belief in a personal God. 7. Law. Relating to a person's movable property: personal possessions. 8. Grammar. Indicating grammatical person. n. 1. A personal item or notice in a newspaper. 2. personals. A column in a newspaper or magazine featuring personal notices. Of, relating to, or characteristic of oneself as an individual. adj. personal, idiosyncratic, individual, individualistic, inner, interior, internal, intimate, inward, own, particular, peculiar, private, intrinsic. Based on individual judgment. adj. discretional, arbitrary, personal, subjective. Antonyms: objective.

personality
personality (pursnalite) n. pl. personalities. 1. The quality or condition of being a person. 2. The totality of qualities and traits, as of character or behavior, that are peculiar to a specific person. 3. The pattern of collective character, behavioral, temperamental, emotional, and mental traits of a person: Though their personalities differed, they got along as friends. 4. Distinctive qualities of a person, especially those distinguishing personal characteristics that make one socially appealing: won the election more on personality than on capability. disposition. 5. A person as the embodiment of distinctive traits of mind and behavior. Usage Problem. A person of prominence or notoriety: television personalities. 6. Often personalities. An offensively personal remark: Let's not engage in personalities. 7. The distinctive characteristics of a place or situation: furnishings that give a room personality. n. attributive. Often used to modify another noun: personality disorders; a personality problem. [Middle English personalite, from Old French, from Late Latin personalitas, from Latin personalis, personal, from persona, person.] A person's emotional, intellectual, and moral qualities: personality, humor, cast, character, complexion, constitution, disposition, identity, makeup, nature, persona, spirit, temperament. See Index: personality

personalization n. To attribute human or personal qualities to; personify.

personalize v.tr. personalized, personalizing, personalizes. 1. To take (a general remark or characterization) in a personal manner. 2. To attribute human or personal qualities to; personify. 3. To have printed, engraved, or monogrammed with one's name or initials: personalized the stationery; personalized the bath towels. per'sonaliza'tion n. To make noticeable or different. v. individualize, particularize, differentiate, discriminate, distinguish, mark, qualify, set apart, set off, personalize, single out, type. To give a concrete form to an abstract quality. v. embody, externalize, personalize, incarnate, materialize, objectify, personify, substantiate, manifest, actualize, exemplify. Antonyms: disembody.

personification n. A person or thing typifying a certain quality or idea; an embodiment or exemplification; a person who represents an abstract quality; "she is the personification of optimism."

personify (prsonfi) v. tr. personified, personifying, personifies. 1. To think of or represent (an inanimate object or abstraction) as having personality or the qualities, thoughts, or movements of a living being: "To make history or psychology alive I personify it" (Anais Nin). 2. To represent (an object or abstraction) by a human figure. 3. To represent (an abstract quality or idea): This character personifies evil. 4. To be the embodiment or perfect example of: "Stalin now personified bolshevism in the eyes of the world" (A. J. P. Taylor). [French personnifier, from personne, person, from Old French persone.] person'ifi'er n. To show or demonstrate by example. v. illustrate, epitomize, embody, evince, exemplify, instance, manifest, personify, represent, typify. To give a concrete form to an abstract quality. v. embody, externalize, personalize, incarnate, materialize, objectify, personify, substantiate, manifest, actualize, exemplify. Antonyms: disembody.

personnel n. 1.a. The body of persons employed by or active in an organization, business, or service. b. (used with a pl. verb) Persons. 2. An administrative division of an organization concerned with the body of persons employed by or active in it and often acting as a liaison between different departments. [French, from Old French, personal, from Latin persnlis. See personality.]

pertaining v. 1. refer, pertain, relate, concern, come to, bear on, touch, touch on – (have to do with or be relevant to; "There were lots of questions referring to her talk"; "My remark pertained to your earlier comments") 2. pertain, appertain – (be a part or attribute of)

pertains v. 1. To have reference; relate: evidence that pertains to the accident. 2. To belong as an adjunct, part, holding, or quality. 3. To be fitting or suitable. To belong; to have connection with, or dependence on, something, as an appurtenance, attribute, etc.; to appertain; as, saltness pertains to the ocean; flowers pertain to plant life. Men hate those who affect that honor by ambition which pertaineth not to them. – Hayward. 2. To have relation or reference to something. These words pertain unto us at this time as they pertained to them at their time. – Latimer.

pervade pervades pervaded v. 1. To spread or diffuse throughout, be present throughout, permeate, penetrate, interpenetrate, diffuse, imbue – “An atmosphere of distrust has permeated this administration”; “music penetrated the entire building”) 2. To pass or flow through, as an aperture, pore, or interstice; to permeate. “That labyrinth is easily pervaded.” – Blackstone. 2. To pass or spread through the whole extent of; to be diffused throughout. “A spirit of cabal, intrigue, and proselytism pervaded all their thoughts, words, and actions.” – Burke. pervading adj.

pervading adj : spread throughout pervade v. To be present throughout; permeate. 1. To pass or flow through, as an aperture, pore, or interstice; to permeate. That labyrinth is easily pervaded. – Blackstone. 2. To pass or spread through the whole extent of; to be diffused throughout. A spirit of cabal, intrigue, and proselytism pervaded all their thoughts, words, and actions. – Burke.

perversion n. 1. (a curve that reverses the direction of something; "the tendrils of the plant exhibited perversion"; "perversion also shows up in kinky telephone cords") 2. sexual perversion – (an aberrant sexual practice that is preferred to normal intercourse) 3. perversion – (the action of perverting something (turning it to a wrong use); "it was a perversion of justice")

pervert v. pervert n. deviant, deviate, degenerate – (a person whose behavior deviates from what is acceptable especially in sexual behavior)

petition n. To make a prayer or request to; to ask from; to solicit; to entreat; especially, to make a formal written supplication, or application to, as to any branch of the government; as, to petition the court; to petition the governor. You have . . . petitioned all the gods for my prosperity. – Shak. A prayer; a supplication; an imploration; an entreaty; especially, a request of a solemn or formal kind; a prayer to the Supreme Being, or to a person of superior power, rank, or authority; also, a single clause in such a prayer. A house of prayer and petition for thy people. – 1 Macc. vii. 37. This last petition heard of all her prayer. – Dryden. (a formal message requesting something that is submitted to an authority) prayer, petition, orison – (reverent petition to a deity)

phase (faz) n. 1. A distinct stage of development: "The American occupation of Japan fell into three successive phases" (Edwin O. Reischauer). 2. A temporary manner, attitude, or pattern of behavior: just a passing phase. 3. An aspect; a part: every phase of the operation. 4. Astronomy. One of the cyclically recurring apparent forms of the moon or a planet. 5. Physics. A particular stage in a periodic process or phenomenon. The fraction of a complete cycle elapsed as measured from a specified reference point and often expressed as an angle. 6. Chemistry. Any of the forms or states, solid, liquid, gas, or plasma, in which matter can exist, depending on temperature and pressure. A discrete homogeneous part of a material system that is mechanically separable from the rest, as is ice from water. 7. Biology. A characteristic form, appearance, or stage of development that occurs in a cycle or that distinguishes some individuals of a group: the white color phase of a weasel; the swarming phase of locusts.v. tr. phased, phas-ing, phas-es. 1. To plan or carry out systematically by phases. 2. To set or regulate so as to be synchronized. --phrasal verbs. phase in. To introduce, one stage at a time. phase out. To bring or come to an end, one stage at a time. --idiom. in phase. In a correlated or synchronized way. out of phase. In an unsynchronized or uncorrelated way. [Back-formation from New Latin phases, phases of the moon, from Greek, pl. of phasis, appearance, from phainein, to show.] --pha'sic (fazik). adj. SYNONYM: phase, aspect, facet, angle, side: These nouns refer to a particular or possible way of viewing something, such as an object, a situation, or a process. Phase may denote a change in an object itself rather than in the viewpoint of an observer (an ermine in its winter color phase), but the term also refers to a stage or period of change or development: "A phase of my life was closing tonight, a new one opening tomorrow" (Charlotte Bronte). Aspect is the way something appears to an observer at a specific vantage point: "In our description of nature the purpose is ... to track down ... relations between the manifold aspects of our experience" (Niels Bohr). A facet is one of numerous aspects, as of a problem: studying the many facets of life in manufacturing towns after the Industrial Revolution. Angle suggests a limitation of perspective, frequently with emphasis on the observer's own point of view: an account of the causes of World War II from the angle of the Allies. Side refers to something having two or more parts or aspects: "Much might be said on both sides" (Joseph Addison) The period of time during which someone or something exists : era, age, chapter, day, epoch, generation, heyday, hour, lifetime, moment, phase, season, stage. Usually one in a series of activities to accomplish an objective : step, act, deed, measure, maneuver, operation, course, phase, stage, proceeding, action, move. A unit or division of time : period, season, phase, interval, term, era, epoch, interlude, duration, age

phenomena n. 1. An appearance; anything visible; whatever, in matter or spirit, is apparent to, or is apprehended by, observation; any state or process known through the senses rather than by intuition or reasoning; as, the phenomena of heat, light, or electricity; phenomena of imagination or memory. “In the phenomena of the material world, and in many of the phenomena of mind.” – Stewart. 2. That which strikes one as strange, unusual, or unaccountable; an extraordinary or very remarkable person, thing, or occurrence; a remarkable development; an unusual, significant, or unaccountable fact or occurrence; a marvel; a remarkable or outstanding person; a paragon, a wonder, as, a musical phenomenon. 3. Philosophy. That which appears real to the mind, regardless of whether its underlying existence is proved or its nature understood. In Kantian philosophy, the appearance of an object to the mind as opposed to its existence in and of itself, independent of the mind. 4. Physics. An observable event. [Late Latin phaenomenon, from Greek phainomenon, from neuter present participle of phainesthai, to appear.] phenomenon n. n.pl. phenomena An occurrence, a circumstance, or a fact that is perceptible by the senses. An unusual, significant, or unaccountable fact or occurrence; a marvel. Extraordinary things, occurrences, or persons; remarkable or outstanding; a paragon, a wonder. That which strikes one as strange, unusual, or unaccountable; an extraordinary or very remarkable person, thing, or occurrence; as, a musical phenomenon. (any state or process known through the senses rather than by intuition or reasoning) 2. phenomenon – (a remarkable development) USAGE NOTES: Phenomenon is the only singular form of this noun; phenomena is the usual plural. Phenomenons may also be used as the plural in nonscientific writing when the meaning is "extraordinary things, occurrences, or persons": They were phenomenons in the history of music. Someone or something that evokes surprise and admiration: sensation, knockout, marvel, miracle, phenomenon, prodigy, rarity, sight, spectacle, wonder. An event inexplicable by the laws of nature: miracle, marvel, phenomenon, prodigy, sensation, mystery, divine act, supernatural happening, wonder.

philosophy n. pl. philosophies. 1. Love and pursuit of wisdom by intellectual means and moral self-discipline. The investigation of causes and laws underlying reality. A system of philosophical inquiry or demonstration. 2. Inquiry into the nature of things based on logical reasoning rather than empirical methods. 3. The critique and analysis of fundamental beliefs as they come to be conceptualized and formulated. 4. The synthesis of all learning. 5. All learning except technical precepts and practical arts. 6. All the disciplines presented in university curriculums of science and the liberal arts, except medicine, law, and theology. 7. The science comprising logic, ethics, aesthetics, metaphysics, and epistemology. 8. A system of motivating concepts or principles: the philosophy of a culture. 9. A basic theory; a viewpoint: an original philosophy of advertising. 10. The system of values by which one lives: has an unusual philosophy of life. [Middle English philosophie, from Old French, from Latin philosophia, from Greek, from philosophos, lover of wisdom, philosopher.] A system of belief, principles, or opinions: creed, dogma, faith, religion, philosophy, doctrine, credo, canons, gospel.

physique n. The body considered with reference to its proportions, muscular development, and appearance: "a short man with . . . the physique of a swimmer" (John le Carre). [French, physical, physique, from Latin physicus, of nature, from Greek phusikos, fromphusis, nature. bheu.] physiqued' adj. Physical makeup or structure: build, constitution, physique, configuration, formation, construction, composition, texture.

planetary adj. 1. Of, relating to, or resembling the physical or orbital characteristics of a planet or the planets. 2. Of or relating to the earth; terrestrial or earthly: measured the planetary tilt in degrees. Of or affecting the entire world; global: a planetary consensus. 3. Wandering; erratic: a planetary life. 4. Being or relating to a gear train consisting of a central gear with an internal ring gear and one or more pinions. (PLANETIZE 710: of the Satania system, began to planetize.)

plausible adj. 1. Seemingly or apparently valid, likely, or acceptable; credible: a plausible excuse. 2. Giving a deceptive impression of truth, acceptability, or reliability; specious: the plausible talk of a crafty salesperson. [Latin plausibilis, deserving applause, from plausus, past participle of plaudere, to applaud.] plau'sibil'ity or plau'sibleness n. plau'sibly adv. SYNONYM: plausible, believable, colorable, credible The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "appearing to merit belief or acceptance": a plausible pretext; a believable excuse; a colorable explanation; a credible assertion. Ant: implausible

ponder v. To reflect or consider, to weigh in the mind, with thoroughness and care; to view with deliberation; to examine carefully; to consider attentively. Ponder the path of thy feet. – Prov. iv. 26. [Usage: To consider means to view or contemplate with fixed thought. To ponder is to dwell upon with long and anxious attention, with a view to some practical result or decision. To muse is simply to think upon continuously with no definite object, or for the pleasure it gives. We consider any subject which is fairly brought before us; we ponder a concern involving great interests; we muse on the events of childhood.]

portals n. (a grand and imposing entrance (often extended metaphorically); “the portals of the cathedral”; “the portals of heaven”; “the portals of success”)

portray v. 1. To depict or represent pictorially; make a picture of. To paint or draw the likeness of; to adorn with pictures. Spear and helmets thronged, and shields Various with boastful arguments potrayed. – (Milton) Take a tile, and lay it before thee, and portray upon it the city, even Jerusalem. – (Ezek. iv.1) 2. To depict or describe in words. 3. To represent dramatically, as on the stage. portrayal n.

posit n (logic) a proposition that is accepted as true in order to provide a basis for logical reasoning [syn: postulate] v 1: put (something somewhere) firmly; "She posited her hand on his shoulder"; "deposit the suitcase on the bench"; "fix your eyes on this spot" [syn: situate, fix, deposit] 2: put before; "I submit to you that the accused is guilty" [syn: submit, state, put forward] 3: take as a given; assume as a postulate or axiom; "He posited three basic laws of nature" [syn: postulate] 1. To assume the existence of; postulate. 2. To put forward, as for consideration or study; suggest: “If a book is hard going, it ought to be good. If it posits a complex moral situation, it ought to be even better” (Anthony Burgess). 3. To place firmly in position. To dispose or set firmly or fixedly; to place or dispose in relation to other objects. 2. (Logic) To assume as real or conceded; as, to posit a principle.

postmoral = post + moral. post- pref. 1. After; later: postmillennial. 2. Behind; posterior to: postaxial. [French poste, from Italian posto, from Old Italian, from Vulgar Latin *postum, from Latin positum, neuter past participle of pnere, to place.] + moral adj. 1. Of or concerned with the judgment of the goodness or badness of human action and character: moral scrutiny; a moral quandary. 2. Teaching or exhibiting goodness or correctness of character and behavior: a moral lesson. 3. Conforming to standards of what is right or just in behavior; virtuous: a moral life. 4. Arising from conscience or the sense of right and wrong: a moral obligation. 5. Having psychological rather than physical or tangible effects: a moral victory; moral support. 6. Based on strong likelihood or firm conviction, rather than on the actual evidence: a moral certainty.

postulate n. An unproved assertion or assumption, especially a statement offered as the basis of a theory. 1. Something assumed without proof as being self-evident or generally accepted, especially when used as a basis for an argument: “the postulate that there is little moral difference between the superpowers” (Henry A. Kissinger). 2. A fundamental element; a basic principle. 3. Mathematics. An axiom. 4. A requirement; a prerequisite. postulate v. To make claim for; demand. To assume or assert the truth, reality, or necessity of, especially as a basis of an argument. To assume as a premise or axiom; take for granted.

postulates n. 1. Something assumed without proof as being self-evident or generally accepted, especially when used as a basis for an argument: “the postulate that there is little moral difference between the superpowers” (Henry A. Kissinger). 2. A fundamental element; a basic principle. 3. Mathematics. An axiom. 4. A requirement; a prerequisite. postulate v. To make claim for; demand. To assume or assert the truth, reality, or necessity of, especially as a basis of an argument. To assume as a premise or axiom; take for granted.

potency n. 1. effectiveness, strength – (capacity to produce strong physiological or chemical effects; “the toxin's potency”; “the strength of the drinks”) 2. potential, potentiality, potency – (the inherent capacity for coming into being) 3. potency – (the state of being potent; a male's capacity to have sexual intercourse)

potential energy n. The energy of a particle or system of particles derived from position, or condition, rather than motion. A raised weight, coiled spring, or charged battery has potential energy.

potential n. 1. The inherent ability or capacity for growth, development, or coming into being. 2. Something possessing the capacity for growth or development. 3. Grammar. A potential verb form. (“It may snow.”) 4. Physics. The work required to bring a unit electric charge, magnetic pole, or mass from an infinitely distant position to a designated point in a static electric, magnetic, or gravitational field, respectively. 5. Electricity. The potential energy of a unit charge at any point in an electric circuit measured with respect to a specified reference point in the circuit or to ground; voltage. [Middle English potencial, from Old French potenciel, from Late Latin potentialis, powerful, from Latin potentia, power, from potens, potent, present participle of posse, to be able. ] Syn. (The power to perform a task): capability, capacity, ability, competence, facility, faculty, knack, means, might, mind, potential, skill, wherewithal. Antonyms: inadequacy, incompetence, ineptitude, inability. (The attributes that qualify a person for a role): potential, quality, stuff, talent, makings, material, potentiality, ability, capability. Latent but capable of being activated. adj. dormant, inactive, potential, quiescent, resting. Capable of being but not yet in existence; latent: a potential problem. 2. Having possibility, capability, or power; existing in possibility; capable of development into actuality. “A potential hero.” – Carlyle

potential adj. 1. Capable of being but not yet in existence; latent: a potential problem. 2. Having possibility, capability, or power. 3. Grammar. Of, relating to, or being a verbal construction with auxiliaries such as may or can; for example, it may snow. n. Abbr. pot. 1. The inherent ability or capacity for growth, development, or coming into being. 2. Something possessing the capacity for growth or development. 3. Grammar. A potential verb form. 4. Physics. The work required to bring a unit electric charge, magnetic pole, or mass from an infinitely distant position to a designated point in a static electric, magnetic, or gravitational field, respectively. 5. SymbolV Electricity. The potential energy of a unit charge at any point in an electric circuit measured with respect to a specified reference point in the circuit or to ground; voltage. [Middle English potencial, from Old French potenciel, from Late Latin potentialis, powerful, from Latin potentia, power, from potens, potent, present participle of posse, to be able. POTENT.] poten'tially adv. The power to perform a task: capability, capacity, ability, competence, facility, faculty, knack, means, might, mind, potential, skill, wherewithal. Antonyms: inadequacy, incompetence, ineptitude, inability. The attributes that qualify a person for a role: potential, quality, stuff, talent, makings, material, potentiality, ability, capability. Latent but capable of being activated. adj. dormant, inactive, potential, quiescent, resting. potential energy (ptenshl enrje) n. The energy of a particle or system of particles derived from position, or condition, rather than motion. A raised weight, coiled spring, or charged battery has potential energy.

potentially adj. adv. With a possibility of becoming actual; “introducing possibly dangerous innovations”; “he is potentially dangerous”; “potentially useful” [syn: possibly] 1. Capable of being but not yet in existence; latent: a potential problem. 2. Having possibility, capability, or power.

pre pref. 1. Earlier; before; prior to: prehistoric. Preparatory; preliminary: premedical. In advance: prepay. 2. Anterior; in front of: preaxial. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin prae, from prae, before, in front.]

preclude v. tr. precluded, precluding, precludes. 1. To make impossible, as by action taken in advance; prevent. prevent. 2. To exclude or prevent (someone) from a given condition or activity: Modesty precludes me from accepting the honor. [Latin praecludere: prae, pre + claudere, to close.] preclu'sion (kloozhn). n. preclu'sive (kloosiv, ziv). adj. preclu'sively adv. To prohibit from occurring by advance planning or action. v. prevent, avert, deter, forestall, head off, obviate, preclude, rule out, stave off, turn aside, ward off, nip in the bud.

predicament n. quandary, plight – (a situation from which extrication is difficult especially an unpleasant or trying one; “finds himself in a most awkward predicament”; “the woeful plight of homeless people”)

predicated v. 1. To base or establish (a statement or action, for example): I predicated my argument on the facts. 2. To state or affirm as an attribute or quality of something: The sermon predicated the perfectibility of humankind. 3. To carry the connotation of; imply. 4. Logic. To make (a term or expression) the predicate of a proposition. 5. To proclaim or assert; declare; connote – involve as a necessary condition of consequence; as in logic; “solving the problem is predicated on understanding it well”

predictable adj. Possible to foretell [ant: unpredictable] predict v. Call, forecast, foretell, prognosticate. These verbs mean to tell about something in advance of its occurrence by means of special knowledge or inference: predict an eclipse; couldn't call the outcome of the game; forecasting the weather; foretold events that would happen; prognosticating a rebellion.

prepersonal = pre- pref. 1. Earlier; before; prior to: prehistoric. Preparatory; preliminary: premedical. In advance: prepay. 2. Anterior; in front of: preaxial. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin prae, from prae, before, in front.] + personal (purs-nl) adj. 1. Of or relating to a particular person; private: "Like their personal lives, women's history is fragmented, interrupted" (Elizabeth Janeway). 2. Done, made, or performed in person: a personal appearance. Done to or for or directed toward a particular person: a personal favor. 3. Concerning a particular person and his or her private business, interests, or activities; intimate: I have something personal to tell you. 4. Aimed pointedly at the most intimate aspects of a person, especially in a critical or hostile manner: an uncalled-for, highly personal remark. Tending to make remarks, or be unduly questioning, about another's affairs: She always becomes personal in an argument. 5. Of or relating to the body or physical being: personal cleanliness. 6. Relating to or having the nature of a person or self-conscious being: belief in a personal God. 7. Law. Relating to a person's movable property: personal possessions. 8. Grammar. Indicating grammatical person. n. 1. A personal item or notice in a newspaper. 2. personals. A column in a newspaper or magazine featuring personal notices. Of, relating to, or characteristic of oneself as an individual. adj. personal, idiosyncratic, individual, individualistic, inner, interior, internal, intimate, inward, own, particular, peculiar, private, intrinsic. Based on individual judgment. adj. discretional, arbitrary, personal, subjective. Antonyms: objective.

prerogatives n. 1. Privilege, perquisite; an exclusive right or privilege held by a person or group, especially a hereditary or official right. 2. The exclusive right and power to command, decide, rule, or judge: the principal's prerogative to suspend a student. 3. A special quality that confers superiority. An exclusive or peculiar privilege; prior and indefeasible right; fundamental and essential possession; – used generally of an official and hereditary right which may be asserted without question, and for the exercise of which there is no responsibility or accountability as to the fact and the manner of its exercise. The two faculties that are the prerogative of man – the powers of abstraction and imagination. – I. Taylor. An unconstitutional exercise of his prerogative. – Macaulay. Then give me leave to have prerogative. – Shak.

prevails v. 1. predominate, dominate, rule, reign, prevail – (be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance; “Money reigns supreme here”; “Hispanics predominate in this neighborhood”) 2. prevail, hold, obtain – (be valid, applicable, or true; “This theory still holds”) 3. prevail, persist, die hard, run, endure – (continue to exist; “These stories die hard”; “The legend of Elvis endures”) 4. prevail, triumph – (prove superior; “The champion prevailed, though it was a hard fight”) 5. prevail – (use persuasion successfully; “He prevailed upon her to visit his parents”)

primacy (prim-se) n.pl. pri-ma-cies. 1. The state of being first or foremost. 2. Ecclesiastical. The office, rank, or province of primate.[Middle English primacie, from Old French, from Medieval Latin primatia, office of church primate, from Latin primas, primat-, of first rank.] The right or condition of preceding : precedence, priority, predominance, preference, prerogative, primacy, privilege, right-of-way, seniority.

primal adj. Being first in time; original; primeval. Of first or central importance; primary. First; primary; original; chief. It hath the primal eldest curse upon it. – Shak. The primal duties shine aloft like stars. – Wordsworth.

primordial adj. aboriginal, primal, primeval – (having existed from the beginning; in an earliest or original stage or state; "aboriginal forests"; "primal eras before the appearance of life on earth"; "the forest primeval"; "primordial matter"; "primordial forms of life")

procreate v. reproduce, procreate, multiply – (have offspring or young) 1. To beget and conceive (offspring). 2. To produce or create; originate.

prodigal n. profligate, squanderer – (a recklessly extravagant consumer)

profound (pr-found, pro-) adj. pro-found-er, pro-found-est. 1. Situated at, extending to, or coming from a great depth; deep. 2. Coming as if from the depths of one's being: profound contempt. 3. Thoroughgoing; far-reaching: profound social changes. 4. Penetrating beyond what is superficial or obvious: a profound insight. 5. Unqualified; absolute: a profound silence. [Middle English profounde, from Old French profond, from Latin profundus : pro-, before. PRO + fundus, bottom.] --pro-found'ly adv. --pro-found'ness n.Possessed of or exhibiting wisdom. adj. wise, sagacious, enlightened, judicious, profound, sage, sapient. Antonyms: ignorant, stupid, unenlightened. Having depth. adj. profound, ankle-deep, deep, knee-deep. Antonyms: shallow. deep, abysmal, profound The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "extending far downward or inward from a surface": a deep lake; falling from a cliff through abysmal space; a profound glacial chasm.

profusion n. 1. The state of being profuse; abundance; the property of being extremely abundant. 2. Lavish or unrestrained expense; extravagance; the act of one who is profuse; a lavishing or pouring out without stinginess. 3. A profuse outpouring or quantity.

promulgated v. To make known by open declaration, as laws, decrees, or tidings; to publish; as, to promulgate the secrets of a council. Syn: To publish; declare; proclaim, announce.

prophet (profit) n. 1. A person who speaks by divine inspiration or as the interpreter through whom the will of a god is expressed. 2. A person gifted with profound moral insight and exceptional powers of expression. 3. A predictor; a soothsayer. 4. The chief spokesperson of a movement or cause. 5. Prophets n (used with a sing. or pl. verb). Bible. The second of the three divisions of the Hebrew Scriptures, comprising the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the Twelve. table at Bible. [Middle English prophete, from Old French, from Latin propheta, from Greek prophetes: pro, before. PRO + phetes, speaker (from phanai, to speak).] proph'ethood' n. A person who predicts the future: prophet, fortuneteller, augur, forecaster, prognosticator, prophesier, clairvoyant, seer, soothsayer, vaticinator, diviner, geomancer, oracle, sibyl.

propitiating v. appease – (make peace with)

prosecution n. 1. The act or process of prosecuting, or of endeavoring to gain or accomplish something; pursuit by efforts of body or mind; as, the prosecution of a scheme, plan, design, or undertaking; the prosecution of war. Keeping a sharp eye on her domestics . . . in prosecution of their various duties. – Sir W. Scott. 2. The institution and conduct of a legal proceeding.

prospect (prospekt) n. 1. Something expected; a possibility. 2. prospects Chances. Financial expectations, especially of success. 3. A potential customer, client, or purchaser. A candidate deemed likely to succeed. 4. The direction in which an object, such as a building, faces; an outlook. 5. Something presented to the eye; a scene: a pleasant prospect. 6. The act of surveying or examining. 7. The location or probable location of a mineral deposit. An actual or probable mineral deposit. The mineral yield obtained by working an ore.v. pros-pect-ed, pros-pect-ing, pros-pects.v. tr. To search for or explore (a region) for mineral deposits or oil. v. intr. To explore for mineral deposits or oil. [Middle English prospecte, from Latin prospectus, distant view, from past participle of prospicere, to look out : pro-, forward. PRO- + specere, to look at.] The likelihood of a given event : probability, certainty, chance, odds, hope, possibility, prospect. That which is or can be seen : sight, aspect, overlook, panorama, perspective, picture, prospect, scene, scenery, spectacle, view, vista. A view, particularly of a natural setting : scenery, landscape, panorama, picture, prospect, seascape, vista. Something that may occur or be done : possibility, chance, contingency, eventuality, likelihood, prospect, odds.

providence n. (the guardianship and control exercised by a deity; “divine providence”) (a manifestation of God's foresightful care for His creatures) (the prudence and care exercised by someone in the management of resources)

province n. A territory governed as an administrative or political unit of a country or empire. A comprehensive area of knowledge, activity, or interest: a topic falling within the province of ancient history. Field. The range of one's proper duties and functions; scope or jurisdiction.

provisional adj. 1 : provided for a temporary need : suitable or acceptable in the existing situation but subject to change or nullification <a provisional government> <provisional custody of a minor> 2 : of, relating to, or being temporary judicial acts or proceedings (as of attachment, injunction, or sequestration) allowed before final judgment to protect the interests of one or more parties to an action <a provisional remedy> Of the nature of a provision; serving as a provision for the time being; – used of partial or temporary arrangements; as, a provisional government; a provisional treaty.

provisionally adv. By way of provision for the time being; temporarily and conditionally; "they have agreed provisionally"; "was appointed provisionally."

proximity n. The quality or state of being next in time, place, causation, influence, etc.; immediate nearness, either in place, blood, or alliance. The property of being close together; the region close around a person or thing. If he plead proximity of blood That empty title is with ease withstood. – Dryden. [syn: propinquity]

psychological adj. 1. Of or relating to psychology: psychological research; psychological jargon. 2. Of, relating to, or arising from the mind or emotions. 3. Influencing or intended to influence the mind or emotions: psychological warfare. 4. Color. Of or being any of certain primary colors whose mixture may be subjectively conceived as producing other colors. psychologically adv.

puerile adj. 1. Belonging to childhood; juvenile. 2. Immature; childish. [Latin puerlis, from puer, child, boy.] puerilely adv. puerility or puerileness n. 1 marked by or suggesting childishness and immaturity 2 being respiration that is like that of a child in being louder than normal adj 1: of or characteristic of a child; 2: displaying or suggesting a lack of maturity;"adolescent insecurity"; "jejune responses to our problems"; "their behavior was juvenile"; "puerile jokes" [syn: adolescent, jejune, juvenile]

qualification n. 1. The act of qualifying or the condition of being qualified. 2. A quality, ability, or accomplishment that makes a person suitable for a particular position or task; that which qualifies; any natural endowment, or any acquirement, which fits a person for a place, office, or employment, or which enables him to sustain any character with success; an enabling quality or circumstance; requisite capacity or possession. “There is no qualification for government but virtue and wisdom, actual or presumptive.” 3. A condition or circumstance that must be met or complied with: fulfilled the qualifications for registering to vote in the presidential election. 4. A restriction or modification: an offer with a number of qualifications. The act of limiting, or the state of being limited; that which qualifies by limiting; modification; restriction; hence, abatement; diminution; as, to use words without any qualification.

qualitative adj. Of, relating to, or concerning quality. Analysis which merely determines the constituents of a substance without any regard to the quantity of each ingredient; – contrasted with quantitative analysis. (Logic) The tracing of things to their source, and the resolving of knowledge into its original principles.

quarantine n. 1. A period of time during which a vehicle, person, or material suspected of carrying a contagious disease is detained at a port of entry under enforced isolation to prevent disease from entering a country. 2. A place for such detention. 3. Enforced isolation or restriction of free movement imposed to prevent the spread of contagious disease; place into enforced isolation, as for medical reasons; “My dog was quarantined before he could live in England” 4. A condition of enforced isolation.

quest (kwest)n. 1. The act or an instance of seeking or pursuing something; a search. 2. An expedition undertaken in medieval romance by a knight in order to perform a prescribed feat: the quest for the Holy Grail. 3. Archaic. A jury of inquest. v. quest-ed, quest-ing, quests. v. intr. 1. To go on a quest. 2. To search for game.v. tr. To search for; seek. [Middle English queste, from Old French, ultimately from Latin quaesta, feminine past participle of quaerere, to seek, ask.] --quest'er n A trip, often a lengthy one : journey, odyssey, peregrination, pilgrimage, tour, trek, voyage, expedition, excursion, quest, flight, cruise, junket, divagation. A search for the facts or truth about something : investigation, inquiry, inquest, inquisition, probe, quest, study, research. An attempt to find or attain : quest, pursuit, seeking, hunt, exploration, crusade, journey, enterprise, adventure, search. To endeavor to obtain or reach. v. strive, aim, aspire, go for, purpose, pursue, quest, seek, set one's sights on, try, work. To utter or emit a long, mournful, plaintive sound. v. howl, bay, cry, keen, quest, ululate, wail, yowl.

quiescence n. dormancy, quiescency – (a state of quiet (but possibly temporary) inaction; "the volcano erupted after centuries of dormancy") quiescency, dormancy, sleeping – (quiet and inactive restfulness)

quotient n. (the ratio of two quantities to be divided) (the number obtained by division)

reality n.pl. realities. 1. The quality or state of being actual or true. 2. One, such as a person, an entity, or an event, that is actual: “the weight of history and political realities” (Benno C. Schmidt, Jr). 3. The totality of all things possessing actuality, existence, or essence. 4. That which exists objectively and in fact: Your observations do not seem to be about reality. 5. Philosophy. That which has necessary existence and not contingent existence. idiom. in reality. In fact; actually. The quality of being factual or true: reality, accuracy, actuality, authenticity, certainty, correctness, entelechy (rare), fact, factuality, factualness, genuineness, truth. Antonyms: untruth, falsity, inaccuracy. The state or fact of having reality: existence, actuality, being, reality, materiality, tangibility, presence. Antonyms: nonexistence.

realization n. 1. The act of realizing or the condition of being realized. 2. The result of realizing. Something completed successfully: success, fulfillment, realization, accomplishment, achievement, attainment, completion, consummation, culmination. The carrying out of an action to completion: performance, fulfillment, realization, accomplishment, achievement, bringing about, conduct, discharge, dispatch, doing, enactment, execution, fruition, implementation. The manner of performance: interpretation, realization, carrying out, enactment, execution, reading, rendering, rendition. The sum remaining after deducting expenses: profit, gain, net profit, return, take, clear profit, gross profit, realization, yield. The condition of being aware: awareness, alertness, consciousness, cognizance, perception, acuteness, realization, understanding, mindfulness, recognition. Antonyms: ignorance, obliviousness.

realm n. 1. A community or territory over which a sovereign rules; a kingdom. 2. A field, sphere, or province: the realm of science; field. [Middle English realme, from Old French, alteration (influenced by Old French reial, royal), of Latin regimen, government, from regere, to rule. reg.] A particular area of activity, study, or interest: specialty, field, area, arena, bag (slang), bailiwick, department, domain, dominion, orbit, precinct, province, realm, region, sphere, terrain, territory, world. A defined area for action, influence, or control: scope, ambit, compass, extension, extent, orbit, purview, range, reach, realm, stretch, magnitude, amount, size, dimensions, sweep. The natural environment of an animal or plant: habitat, abode, domain, ecosystem, element, environment, haunt, home, range, realm, stamping ground, surroundings, terrain, territory. An organized geopolitical unit: nation, country, land, commonwealth, union, federation, polity, state, kingdom, realm. An area of land over which rule is exercised: domain, country, dominion, empire, kingdom, land, province, realm, territory.

reared v. raise, bring up, nurture, parent – (bring up; “raise a family”; “bring up children”)

reason n. 1. The basis or motive for an action, a decision, or a conviction. 2. A declaration made to explain or justify an action, a decision, or a conviction: inquired about her reason for leaving. 3. An underlying fact or cause that provides logical sense for a premise or an occurrence: There is reason to believe that the accused did not commit this crime. 4. The capacity for logical, rational, and analytic thought; intelligence. 5. Good judgment; sound sense. 6. A normal mental state; sanity: He has lost his reason. 7. Logic. A premise, usually the minor premise, of an argument. v. reasoned, reasoning, reasons. v. intr. 1. To use the faculty of reason; think logically. 2. To talk or argue logically and persuasively. 3. Obsolete. To engage in conversation or discussion. v. tr. 1. To determine or conclude by logical thinking: reasoned out a solution to the problem. 2. To persuade or dissuade (someone) with reasons. idiom. by reason of. Because of. in reason. With good sense or justification; reasonably. within reason. Within the bounds of good sense or practicality. with reason. With good cause; justifiably. [Middle English, from Old French raison, from Latin ratio, ration, from ratus, past participle of reri, to consider, think. ar.] rea'soner n.

reasonable adj. 1. Capable of reasoning; rational: a reasonable person. 2. Governed by or being in accordance with reason or sound thinking: a reasonable solution to the problem. 3. Being within the bounds of common sense: arrive home at a reasonable hour. 4. Not excessive or extreme; fair: reasonable prices. rea'sonabil'ity or rea'sonableness n. rea'sonably adv. Moderate in price. adj. medium-priced, fair, moderate, reasonable, unexcessive, unextravagant. Having or exhibiting sound judgment. adj. judicious, levelheaded, commonsensical, sensible, prudent, rational, reasonable, sound, wellreasoned, wise. Antonyms: foolish, imprudent, illogical, nonsensical. Of sound mind. adj. sane, lucid, all there, rational, reasonable. Antonyms: insane, mad, irrational.

recognition n. 1. The act of recognizing or condition of being recognized. 2. An awareness that something perceived has been perceived before. 3. An acceptance as true or valid, as of a claim: a recognition of their civil rights. 4. Attention or favorable notice: She received recognition for her many achievements. 5. Official acceptance of the national status of a new government by another nation. 6. Biology. The ability of one molecule to attach itself to another molecule having a complementary shape, as in enzymesubstrate and antibodyantigen interactions. [Middle English recognicion, knowledge of an event, from Old French recognition, from Latin recognitio, recognition, act of recognizing, from recognitus, past participle of recognoscere, to recognize.] recog'nito'ry (rikognitore, tore). or recog'nitive (tiv). adj. Favorable notice: credit, acknowledgment, recognition, recognizance. A feeling or expression of gratitude: appreciation, acknowledgment, appreciativeness, gratefulness, recognition, thankfulness, thanks, thanksgiving, gratitude. The act of observing, or taking into account: observation, consideration, notice, recognition, regard, heed, attention, remark. The condition of being aware: awareness, alertness, consciousness, cognizance, perception, acuteness, realization, understanding, mindfulness, recognition. Antonyms: ignorance, obliviousness, disavowal, disclaimer, ingratitude, ungratefulness, thanklessness.

recognize v. recognized, recognizing, recognizes. 1. To know to be something that has been perceived before: recognize a face. 2. To know or identify from past experience or knowledge: recognize hostility. 3. To perceive or show acceptance of the validity or reality of: recognizes the concerns of the tenants. 4. To permit to address a meeting: The club's president recognized the new member. 5. To accept officially the national status of as a new government. 6. To show awareness of; approve of or appreciate: recognize services rendered. 7. To admit the acquaintance of, as by salutation: recognize an old friend with a cheerful greeting. 8. Law. To enter into a recognizance. 9. Biology. To exhibit recognition for (an antigen or a substrate, for example). [Middle English recognisen, to resume possession of land, alteration (influenced by Medieval Latin recognizare, to recognize), of Old French reconoistre, reconoiss, to know again, from Latin recognoscere: re, re + cognoscere, to get to know.]

rectify v. 1. rectify – (math: determine the length of; "rectify a curve") 2. refine, rectify – (reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; separate from extraneous matter or cleanse from impurities; "refine sugar") 3. reform, reclaim, regenerate, rectify – (bring, lead, or force to abandon a wrong or evil course of life, conduct, and adopt a right one; "The Church reformed me"; "reform your conduct") 4. rectify, remediate, remedy, repair, amend – (set straight or right; "remedy these deficiencies"; "rectify the inequities in salaries"; "repair an oversight") 5. correct, rectify, right – (make right or correct; "Correct the mistakes"; "rectify the calculation") 6. rectify – (convert into direct current; "rectify alternating current")

rectitude n. 1. Moral uprightness; righteousness; honesty. 2. The quality or condition of being correct in judgment. 3. The quality of being straight. [Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin rectitudo, from Latin rectus, straight.] Uprightness as a consequence of being honorable and honest.

refer v. referred, referring, refers. v. tr. 1. To direct to a source for help or information: referred her to a heart specialist; referred me to his last employer for a recommendation. 2. To assign or attribute to; regard as originated by. 3. To assign to or regard as belonging within a particular kind or class. 4. To submit (a matter in dispute) to an authority for arbitration, decision, or examination. 5. To direct the attention of: refer him to his duties. v. intr. 1. To pertain; concern: questions referring to yesterday's lecture. 2. To make mention or reference. 3. To have recourse; turn: refer to a dictionary. [Middle English referren, from Old French referer, from Latin referre: re, re + ferre, to carry. bher.]

regard v. regarded, regarding, regards. v. tr. 1. To look at attentively; observe closely. 2. To look upon or consider in a particular way: I regard him as a fool. 3. To hold in esteem or respect: She regards her teachers highly. 4. To relate or refer to; concern: This item regards their liability. 5. To take into account; consider. 6. Obsolete. To take care of. v. intr. 1. To look or gaze. 2. To give heed; pay attention. n. 1. A look or gaze. 2. Careful thought or attention; heed: She gives little regard to her appearance. 3. Respect, affection, or esteem: He has high regard for your work. regards. Good wishes expressing such sentiment: Give the family my best regards. 4. A particular point or aspect; respect: She was lucky in that regard. 5. Basis for action; motive. 6. Obsolete. Appearance or aspect. idiom. as regards. Concerning. in regard to. or with regard to With respect to. [Middle English regarden, from Old French regarder: re, re + guarder, to guard (of Germanic origin.)] Thoughtful and kindly attention: solicitude, concern, considerateness, consideration, regard, thoughtfulness, respect, kindliness. Antonyms: thoughtlessness, selfishness.

relativity n. A state of dependence in which the existence or significance of one entity is solely dependent on that of another. 1. The quality or state of being relative. 2. Philosophy. Existence dependent solely on relation to a thinking mind. 3. A state of dependence in which the existence or significance of one entity is solely dependent on that of another. 4. Physics. Special relativity. General relativity.

reliable (ri-li-bl) adj. Capable of being relied on; dependable: a reliable assistant; a reliable car.--re-li'a-bil'i-ty or re-li'a-ble-ness n. --re-li'a-bly adv. SYNONYM: reliable, dependable, responsible, trustworthy, trusty. The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "worthy of reliance or trust": a reliable source of information; a dependable worker; a responsible used-car dealer; a trustworthy report; a trusty servant of the state. Not subject to change or variation. adj.constant, invariable, continuous, fixed, reliable, stable, static, steady, unchangeable, unchanging, unvarying. Antonyms: inconstant, changeable, varying, unfixed.

religion n. 1. Belief in and reverence for a supernatural power or powers regarded as creator and governor of the universe. A personal or institutionalized system grounded in such belief and worship. 2. The life or condition of a person in a religious order. 3. A set of beliefs, values, and practices based on the teachings of a spiritual leader. 4. A cause, a principle, or an activity pursued with zeal or conscientious devotion. idiom. get religion. Informal. To accept a higher power as a controlling influence for the good in one's life. [Middle English religioun, from Old French religion, from Latin religio, religion, perhaps from religare, to tie fast.] A system of belief, principles, or opinions: creed, dogma, faith, religion, philosophy, doctrine, credo, canons, gospel.

relinquishes v. To retire from; give up or abandon. To put aside or desist from (something practiced, professed, or intended). To let go; surrender. To cease holding physically; release: relinquish a grip.

renders v. 1. To return; to pay back; to restore. Whose smallest minute lost, no riches render may. – Spenser. 2. To inflict, as a retribution; to requite. I will render vengeance to mine enemies. – (Deut. xxxii. 41). 3. To give up; to yield; to surrender. I 'll make her render up her page to me. – Shak. 4. Hence, to furnish; to contribute. Logic renders its daily service to wisdom and virtue. – I. Watts. 5. To furnish; to state; to deliver; as, to render an account; to render judgment. 6. To cause to be, or to become; as, to render a person more safe or more unsafe; to render a fortress secure. 7. To translate from one language into another; as, to render Latin into English. 8. To interpret; to set forth, represent, or exhibit; as, an actor renders his part poorly; a singer renders a passage of music with great effect; a painter renders a scene in a felicitous manner. He did render him the most unnatural That lived amongst men. – Shak. 9. To try out or extract (oil, lard, tallow, etc.) from fatty animal substances; as, to render tallow. 10. To plaster, as a wall of masonry, without the use of lath.

replete adj. 1. Abundantly supplied; abounding: a stream replete with trout; an apartment replete with Empire furniture. 2. Filled to satiation; gorged. 3. Usage Problem. Complete: a computer system replete with color monitor, printer, and software. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin repletus, past participle of replere, to refill: re, re +plere, to fill.] repleteness n. Filled to satiation. adj. replete, full, overfed, overstuffed, gorged, glutted, sated, satiated, stuffed. Antonyms: hungry, unfilled, wanting, empty.

repleteness n. Replete means “abundantly supplied” and is not generally accepted as a synonym for complete. Abounding: a stream replete with trout; an apartment replete with Empire furniture. Filled to satiation; gorged.

repositories n. A place where things are or may be reposited, or laid up, for safety or preservation; a depository.

repulsive adj. 1. abhorrent, detestable, obscene, repugnant, repulsive – (offensive to the mind; "an abhorrent deed"; "the obscene massacre at Wounded Knee"; "morally repugnant customs"; "repulsive behavior"; "the most repulsive character in recent novels") 2. repulsive (prenominal) (vs. attractive) – (possessing the ability to repel; "a repulsive force")

requisition n. 1. A formal written request for something needed. 2. A necessity; a requirement. 3. The state or condition of being needed or put into service.

reservation n. 1. reservation, reserve – (a district that is reserved for particular purpose) 2. reservation, qualification – (a statement that limits or restricts some claim; “he recommended her without any reservations”) 3. mental reservation – (an unstated doubt that prevents you from accepting something wholeheartedly) 4. booking, reservation – (the act of reserving (a place or passage) or engaging the services of (a person or group); “wondered who had made the booking”) 5. reservation – (the written record or promise of an arrangement by which accommodations are secured in advance) 6. reservation – (something reserved in advance (as a hotel accommodation or a seat on a plane etc.) 7. reservation – (the act of keeping back or setting aside for some future occasion)

respective adj. Relating to two or more persons or things regarded individually; particular: successful in their respective fields. Looking toward having reference to; relative, not absolute; as, the respective connections of society. 3. Relating to particular persons or things, each to each; particular; own; as, they returned to their respective places of abode. [Cf. F. respectif, LL. respectivus.]

retributive adj 1: of or relating to or having the nature of retribution; "retributive justice demands an eye for an eye" [syn: retaliatory, relatiative, retributory, vindicatory] 2: given or inflicted in requital according to merits or deserts; "retributive justice" [syn: retributory, vindicatory]

retrievers n. One that retrieves. (Especially any one of several breeds of dog that were developed and trained to retrieve game). retrieve 1. To get back; regain. 2. To rescue or save. Sports. To make a difficult but successful return of (a ball or shuttlecock, as in tennis or badminton). 3. To bring back again; revive or restore. 4. To rectify the unfavorable consequences of; remedy. See Synonyms at recover. 5. To recall to mind; remember. 6. To find and carry back; fetch.v. intr. To find and bring back game: a dog trained to retrieve.n. 1. The act of retrieving; retrieval. 2. Sports. A difficult but successful return of a ball or shuttlecock. [Middle English retreven, from Old French retrover, retruev- : re-, re- + trover, to find.]

retrospect (retr-spekt) n. A review, survey, or contemplation of things in the past.v. ret-ro-spect-ed, ret-ro-spect-ing, ret-ro-spects. v. intr. 1. To contemplate the past. 2. To refer back. v. tr. To look back on or contemplate (things past). --idiom. in retrospect. Looking backward or reviewing the past. [From Latin *retrospectus, past participle of retrospicere, to look back at : retro-, retro- + specere, to look at.]

reveal v. tr. revealed, revealing, reveals. 1. To make known (something concealed or secret): revealed a confidence. To bring to view; show. 2. To make known by supernatural or divine means: "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven" (Romans 1:18). [Middle English revelen, from Old French reveler, from Latin revelare: re, re + velare, to cover (from velum, veil).] reveal'able adj. reveal'er n. reveal'ment n. To put into words; give a verbal account of. v. tell, communicate, recite, retell, spin, relate, narrate, chronicle, describe, present, report, reveal, characterize, delineate, divulge, elucidate, impart, enumerate, quote, recap, recapitulate, review. To tell in confidence. v. confide, breathe, whisper, tell secretly, reveal, impart, disclose. To make one's thoughts, motives, or intentions known. v. announce, advertise, come clean, declare, level, proclaim, publicize, reveal, blazon, broadcast, promulgate, publish, show one's cards. Antonyms: suppress, secrete, hide, withhold. Ant. unrevealed

revealed religion n. A religion founded primarily on the revelations of God to humankind.

revealed v. 1. To make known (something concealed or secret): revealed a confidence. 2. To bring to view; show. 3. To make known by supernatural or divine means; specifically, to communicate (that which could not be known or discovered without divine or supernatural instruction or agency). “For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven” (Romans 1:18). Syn: To communicate; disclose; divulge; unveil; uncover; open; discover; impart; show. Ant. unrevealed

revelation n. An uncovering, a bringing to light of that which had been previously wholly hidden or only obscurely seen. God has been pleased in various ways and at different times (Heb. 1:1) to make a supernatural revelation of himself and his purposes and plans, which, under the guidance of his Spirit, has been committed to writing. The Scriptures are not merely the "record" of revelation; they are the revelation itself in a written form, in order to the accurate preservation and propagation of the truth. Revelation and inspiration differ. Revelation is the supernatural communication of truth to the mind; inspiration secures to the teacher or writer infallibility in communicating that truth to others. It renders its subject the spokesman or prophet of God in such a sense that everything he asserts to be true, whether fact or doctrine or moral principle, is true, infallibly true. (Easton's Bible Dictionary) The act of revealing, disclosing, or discovering to others what was before unknown to them. That which is revealed. (Theol.) (a) The act of revealing divine truth. (b) That which is revealed by God to man; esp., the Bible. By revelation he made known unto me the mystery, as I wrote afore in few words.– Eph. iii. 3. [Middle English revelacion, from Old French revelation, from Latin revelatio, revelation, from revelatus, past participle of revelare, to reveal.]

revelational adj. revelation n. the act of revealing or disclosing. 1. The act of revealing, disclosing, or discovering to others what was before unknown to them. 2. That which is revealed. 3. (Theol.) (a) The act of revealing divine truth. (b) That which is revealed by God to man.

righteous adj. 1. Morally upright; without guilt or sin: a righteous woman. 2. In accordance with virtue or morality: a righteous judgment. 3. Morally justifiable: righteous anger. moral. n. Righteous people considered as a group. [Middle English ryghtuous, alteration of rihtwise, from Old English rihtwis: riht, right + wise].

righteousness n. 1. The quality or state of being righteous; holiness; purity; uprightness; rectitude, adhering to moral principles [ant: unrighteousness]. Righteousness, as used in Scripture and theology, in which it chiefly occurs, is nearly equivalent to holiness, comprehending holy principles and affections of heart, and conformity of life to the divine law. 2. A righteous act, or righteous quality. All our righteousnesses are as filthy rags. --Isa. lxiv. 6. 3. The act or conduct of one who is righteous. Blessed are they that keep judgment, and he that doeth righteousness at all times. --Ps. cvi. 3. righteous adj. 1. Morally upright; without guilt or sin: a righteous parishioner. 2. In accordance with virtue or morality: a righteous judgment. 3. Morally justifiable: righteous anger. Moral. Syn: Uprightness; holiness; godliness; equity; justice; rightfulness; integrity; honesty; faithfulness.

rotated v. 1. To turn, as a wheel, round an axis; to revolve; to turn around on an axis or center. 2. To perform any act, function, or operation in turn, to hold office in turn; as, to rotate in office; to proceed in sequence; take turns or alternate: Interns will rotate through the various departments 3. To plant or grow (crops) in a fixed order of succession.

rotation n. 1. Any return or succession in a series. Regular and uniform variation in a sequence or series. 2. The act or process of turning around a center or an axis.

Salvington (sal' ving ton). The headquarters sphere of the local universe of Nebadon, personal home of the Creator Son, Michael, and the Creative Spirit. (358,5)[32:2.3]. See Index: Salvington

sanctity (sangkti-te) n.pl. sanc-ti-ties. 1. Holiness of life or disposition; saintliness. 2. The quality or condition of being considered sacred; inviolability. 3. Something considered sacred. [Middle English saunctite, from Old French sainctite, from Latin sanctitas, from sanctus, sacred. SANCTIFY.] The quality or condition of being safe from violation : inviolability, sacredness, sanctity. The quality of being holy or sacred : sanctity, blessedness, beatification, divinity, godliness, grace, holiness, sacredness.

scepter n. 1. A staff held by a sovereign as an emblem of authority. 2. Ruling power or authority; sovereignty. v. tr. scep-tered, scep-ter-ing, scep-ters. To invest with royal authority. [Middle English sceptre, from Old French, from Latin sceptrum, from Greek skeptron.] – (the imperial authority symbolized by a scepter) verge, wand – (a ceremonial or emblematic staff)

scientific adj. Of, relating to, or employing the methodology of science. [Med. Lat. scientificus, producing knowledge: Lat. scientia, knowledge + Lat. facere, to make.] scientifically adv. science n. 1. a. The observation, identification, description, experimental investigation, and theoretical explanation of natural phenomena. b. Such activity restricted to a class of natural phenomena. c. Such activity applied to any class of phenomena. 2. Methodological activity, discipline, or study. 3. An activity that appears to require study and method. 4. Knowledge, esp. knowledge gained through experience. [ME, knowledge, learning < OFr. < Lat. scientia < sciens, pr.part. of scire, to know.]

scourge (skurj) n. 1. A source of widespread, dreadful affliction and devastation such as that caused by pestilence or war. 2. A means of inflicting severe suffering, vengeance, or punishment. 3. A whip used to inflict punishment. v. tr. scourged, scourg-ing, scourg-es. 1. To afflict with severe or widespread suffering and devastation; ravage. 2. To chastise severely; excoriate. 3. To flog. [Middle English, from Anglo-Norman escorge, from Old French escorgier, to whip, from Vulgar Latin *excorrigiare : Latin ex-, intensive pref. See EX- + Latin corrigia, thong (probably of Celtic origin).] --scourg'er n A highly infectious, usually fatal disease : plague, pestilence, epidemic, pandemic, scourge, contagion, fatal epidemic, epidemic disease. A cause of suffering or harm : affliction, bad luck, cross to bear, curse, hard luck, plague, thorn in one's side, bane, scourge. Antonyms: blessing. To criticize harshly and devastatingly. v. scathe, blister, excoriate, flay, lash, light into, lash out, scourge, lay into, slash. To lay waste as by plundering or destroying. v. ravage, raze, deflower, depredate, desecrate, desolate, despoil, devastate, devour, pillage, sack, scourge, spoil, spoliate, maraud, strip, waste. To bring great harm or suffering to. v. torture, afflict, blight, curse, excruciate, plague, rack, scourge, smite, strike, torment. Antonyms: comfort, solace. To strike on the buttocks or back as punishment. v. spank, beat, whip, thrash, flog, cane, birch, lash, tan, hide, strap, scourge, switch, larrup, stripe, flagellate, horsewhip, leather, lambaste, whale.

seared v. 1. dry; withered; no longer green; – applied to leaves. scorch – (make very hot and dry; "The heat scorched the countryside") 2. scorch, sear, singe – (become superficially burned; "my eyebrows singed when I bent over the flames") 3. parch, sear – (cause to wither or parch from exposure to heat; "The sun parched the earth") 1. To wither; to dry up. 2. To burn (the surface of) to dryness and hardness; to cauterize; to expose to a degree of heat such as changes the color or the hardness and texture of the surface; to scorch; to make callous; as, to sear the skin or flesh. Also used figuratively. I'm seared with burning steel. --Rowe. It was in vain that the amiable divine tried to give salutary pain to that seared conscience.--Macaulay. The discipline of war, being a discipline in destruction of life, is a discipline in callousness. Whatever sympathies exist are seared. --H. Spencer. Sear is allied to scorch in signification; but it is applied primarily to animal flesh, and has special reference to the effect of heat in marking the surface hard. Scorch is applied to flesh, cloth, or any other substance, and has no reference to the effect of hardness. sear adj : (used especially of vegetation) having lost all moisture; "dried-up grass"; "the desert was edged with sere vegetation"; "shriveled leaves on the unwatered seedlings"; "withered vines" [syn: dried-up, sere, shriveled, shrivelled, withered] v 1: make very hot and dry; "The heat scorched the countryside" [syn: scorch] 2: become superficially burned; "my eyebrows singed when I bent over the flames" [syn: scorch, singe] 3: cause to wither or parch from exposure to heat; "The sun parched the earth" [syn: parch] [Middle English seren, from Old English sarian, to wither, from sar, withered.]

sector n. 1. Mathematics. The portion of a circle bounded by two radii and one of the intercepted arcs. 2. a. A division of a defensive position for which one military unit is responsible. b. A division of an offensive position. 3. A part or division of something, such as a city, resembling a military sector. 4. Computer Science. A bit or a set of bits on a magnetic storage system making up the smallest addressable unit of information. -tr.v.-tored -toring -tors To divide into sectors. [LLat. < Lat., cutter < secare, to cut.] sectorial adj.

sectors n. A part or division, as of a city or a national economy: the manufacturing sector; the private sector. A division of a defensive position for which one military unit is responsible. A division of an offensive military position.

seer n. 1. One that sees. 2. A prophet. 3. A clairvoyant. [ME < seen, to see.]

segregate v. tr. 1. To separate or isolate from others or from a main body or group. 2. To impose the separation of (a race or class) from the rest of society. They are still segregated, Christians from Christians, under odious designations. – I. Taylor. 3. Divide from the main body or mass and collect; “Many towns segregated into new counties”; “Experiments show clearly that genes segregate”) 4. Separate or isolate (one thing) from another and place in a group apart from others; “the sun degregates the carbon”; “large mining claims are segregated into smaller claims”)

segregated v. 1. segregate – (separate by race or religion; practice a policy of racial segregation; "This neighborhood is segregated"; "We don't segregate in this county") 2. segregate – (divide from the main body or mass and collect; "Many towns segregated into new counties"; "Experiments show clearly that genes segregate") 3. segregate – (separate or isolate (one thing) from another and place in a group apart from others; "the sun degregates the carbon"; "large mining claims are segregated into smaller claims")

self-existent self + existent (vs. nonexistent), existing – (having existence or being or actuality; “an attempt to refine the existent machinery to make it more efficient”; “much of the beluga caviar existing in the world is found in the Soviet Union and Iran”) 2. real (vs. unreal), existent – (being or occurring in fact or actuality; having verified existence; not illusory; “real objects”; “real people; not ghosts”; “a film based on real life”; “a real illness”; “real humility”; “Life is real! Life is earnest!” – Longfellow) 3. actual (vs. potential), existent – (presently existing in fact and not merely potential or possible; “the predicted temperature and the actual temperature were markedly different”; “actual and imagined conditions”)

sentimental adj. 1. a. Characterized by or swayed by sentiment. b. Affectedly or extravagantly emotional. 2. Resulting from or colored by emotion rather than reason or realism. 3. Appealing to the sentiments, esp. to romantic feelings: sentimental music. sentimentally adv.

sequential adj. Succeeding or following in order: in regular succession without gaps. 1. Forming or characterized by a sequence, as of units or musical notes. 2. Sequent; in regular succession without gaps; “serial concerts” [syn: consecutive, sequent, serial, successive]

sequentiality adj. Forming or characterized by a sequence, as of units or musical notes.

significant adj. 1. Having or expressing a meaning; meaningful. 2. Having or expressing a covert meaning; suggestive: a significant glance. 3. Notable; valuable. [Lat. significans, significant-, pr.part. of significare, to signify.] significantly adv. significance or significancy n. 1. The state or quality of being significant. 2. Meaning; import. 3. Implied meaning; suggestiveness.

slavish adj. 1. Pertaining to or characteristic of a slave; servile: slavish devotion. 2. Pertaining to or characteristic of the institution of slavery; oppressive. 3. Showing no originality; blindly imitative: a slavish copy of the original. slavishly adv. slavishness n.

solicitude n. 1. The state of being solicitous; care or concern, as for the well-being of another. See Synonyms at anxiety. 2. Often solicitudes. A cause of anxiety or concern. solicitous 1. Anxious or concerned: a solicitous parent. Expressing care or concern: made solicitous inquiries about our family. Thoughtful. 2. Full of desire; eager. 3. Marked by or given to anxious care and often hovering attentiveness. 4. Extremely careful; meticulous: solicitous in matters of behavior. [Latin sollicitus : sollus, entire. See sol-. + citus, past participle of ciere, to set in motion]. solicitousness – (a feeling of excessive concern)

solitary (soli-tere) adj. 1. Existing, living, or going without others; alone: a solitary traveler. See Synonyms at alone. 2. Happening, done, or made alone: a solitary evening; solitary pursuits such as reading and sewing. 3. Remote from civilization; secluded: a solitary retreat. 4. Having no companions; lonesome or lonely. 5. Zoology. Living alone or in pairs only: solitary wasps; solitary sparrows. 6. Single and set apart from others: a solitary instance of cowardice. See Synonyms at single.n.pl. sol-i-tar-ies. 1. A person who lives alone; a recluse. 2. Solitary confinement. [Middle English, from Old French solitaire, from Latin solitarius, from solitas, solitude, from solus, alone. See s (w)e-.]--sol'i-tar'i-ly (-tar-le). adv. --sol'i-tar'i-ness n. A place for the confinement of lawbreakers : jail, jailhouse, prison, lockup, solitary, penitentiary, pen, can (slang), pokey, slammer (slang), stir (slang), clink, cooler, nick, calaboose, hoosegow (slang), the big house, cage, cell, brig, guardhouse, stockade, reform school, reformatory, detention home, dungeon, donjon, oubliette. Living in isolation; hermitlike. adj. reclusive, alone, asocial, antisocial, cloistered, eremitic, eremitical, hermitic, hermitical, isolated, monastic, solitary, troglodytic, troglodytical, unsociable, unsocial. Antonyms: sociable, social, amiable, friendly. Lacking company or association. adj.solitary, by oneself, alone, alienated, friendless, lone, lonely, lonesome, single, solo. Antonyms: accompanied.

sordid adj. 1. seamy, seedy, sleazy, sordid, squalid – (morally degraded; “a seedy district”; “the seamy side of life”; “sleazy characters hanging around casinos”; “sleazy storefronts with...dirt on the walls”- Seattle Weekly; “the sordid details of his orgies stank under his very nostrils”- James Joyce; “the squalid atmosphere of intrigue and betrayal”) 2. dirty, sordid – (unethical or dishonest; “dirty police officers”; “a sordid political campaign”) 3. flyblown, squalid, sordid – (foul and run-down and repulsive; “a flyblown bar on the edge of town”; “a squalid overcrowded apartment in the poorest part of town”; “squalid living conditions”; “sordid shantytowns”) 4. sordid – (meanly avaricious and mercenary; “sordid avarice”; “sordid material interests”)

sovereign n. crowned head, monarch – (a nation's ruler or head of state usually by hereditary right)

sovereignty n 1: government free from external control 2: royal authority; the dominion of a monarch [syn: reign]

span n., v., spanned, spanning. -n. 1. the full extent, stretch, or reach of something. 2. a period of time during which something continues; duration. 3. the distance from the end of the thumb to the end of the little finger of a spread hand; also : an English unit of length equal to 9 inches (22.9 centimeters). A spread between two limits. a : a limited space (as of time); especially : an individual's lifetime b: the spread or extent between abutments or supports (as of a bridge); also: a portion thus supported (as an arch), the distance or space between two supports of a structure. (Etymology: Middle English, from Old English spann; akin to Old High German spanna span, Middle Dutch spannen to stretch, hitch up. Date: before 12th century). span (1) n. 1. The extent or measure of space between two points or extremities, as of a bridge or roof; breadth. 2. The distance between the tips of an airplane's wings. 3. The section between two intermediate supports of a bridge. 4. Something that spans, as a railroad trestle or bridge. 5. The distance from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the little finger when the hand is fully extended, formerly used as a unit of measure equal to about nine inches. 6. A period of time: a life span. -tr.v.spanned spanning spans 1. To measure by or as if by the fully extended hand. 2. To encircle with the hand or hands in or as if in measuring. 3. To extend across: a career that spanned 40 years. 4. To form a span over: The footbridge spanned the gorge. [ME, unit of measurement < OE spann.] span (2) tr.v. spanned spanning spans To bind or fetter. -n. 1. Nautical. A stretch of rope made fast at either end. 2. A pair of animals, such as oxen, matched in size, strength, or color. [MDu. spannen.]

speculation (speky-lashn) n. 1. Contemplation or consideration of a subject; meditation. A conclusion, an opinion, or a theory reached by conjecture. Reasoning based on inconclusive evidence; conjecture or supposition. 2. Engagement in risky business transactions on the chance of quick or considerable profit. A commercial or financial transaction involving speculation. Something taken to be true without proof : presupposition, assumption, postulate, postulation, premise, presumption, supposition, thesis, theory, hypothesis, speculation, conjecture. The act or process of thinking : thought, brainwork, cerebration, cogitation, contemplation, mental activity, musing, pondering, rumination, wondering, meditation, reflection, speculation. Careful consideration of a matter : deliberation, advisement, calculation, contemplation, debate, evaluation, examination, meditation, pondering, reflection, rumination, speculation, study. A venture depending on chance : speculation, bet, crap-shoot (informal), gamble, venture, wager, wagering, risk. A judgment arrived at by guessing : conjecture, assumption, expectation, guess, postulation, presumption, supposition, speculation, suspicion, theory, hypothesis, inference, surmise. Antonyms: fact, surety, certainty.

sphere n. 1. Mathematics. A three-dimensional surface all points of which are equidistant from a fixed point. 2. A spherical object or figure. 3. A planet, star, or other heavenly body. 4. The sky, appearing as a hemisphere to an observer: the sphere of the heavens. 5. Any of a series of concentric, transparent, revolving globes that together were once thought to contain the moon, sun, planets, and stars. 6. The extent of a person's knowledge, interests, or social position. 7. An area of power, control, or influence; domain. -tr.v.sphered sphering spheres 1. To form into a sphere. 2. To put in or within a sphere. 3. To surround or encompass. [ME spere < OFr. espere < Lat. sphaera, ball < Gk. sphaira.] sphericity n.

spinal adj. 1. Of, relating to, or situated near the spine or spinal cord; vertebral; pertaining to a spine or to the vertebral column.

spiritize v : imbue with a spirit.

sponsor v. 1: assume sponsorship of [syn: patronize, patronise] 2: assume responsibility for or leadership of; “The senator announced that he would sponsor the health care plan” 3: do one's shopping at; do business with; be a customer or client of [syn: patronize, patronise, shop, frequent] n. 1. One who assumes responsibility for another person or a group during a period of instruction, apprenticeship, or probation. 2. One who vouches for the suitability of a candidate for admission. 3. A legislator who proposes and urges adoption of a bill. 4. One who presents a candidate for baptism or confirmation; a godparent. 5. One that finances a project or an event carried out by another person or group, especially a business enterprise that pays for radio or television programming in return for advertising time.

spontaneity n : the quality of being spontaneous and coming from natural feelings without constraint; "the spontaneity of his laughter"

stationary adj. 1. Not moving; standing still. One who, or that which, is stationary, as a planet when apparently it has neither progressive nor retrograde motion. 2. Not capable of being moved; fixed. 3. Unchanging. Not improving or getting worse; not growing wiser, greater, better, more excellent, or the contrary.

stimulus (stimy-ls) n.pl. stim-u-li (-li). 1. Something causing or regarded as causing a response. 2. An agent, an action, or a condition that elicits or accelerates a physiological or psychological activity or response. 3. Something that incites or rouses to action; an incentive: "Works which were in themselves poor have often proved a stimulus to the imagination" (W.H. Auden). [Latin goad.] Something that incites or rouses to action : stimulus, catalyst, fillip, goad, incitement, instigation, motivation, prod, push, spur, stimulant, provocation, activator, energizer, excitant.

stupendous adj. So great in size or force or extent as to elicit awe. Of astounding force, volume, degree, or excellence; marvelous. Amazingly large or great; huge; enormous. Astonishing; wonderful; amazing; especially, astonishing in magnitude or elevation; as, a stupendous pile. “A stupendous sum.” – Macaulay. All are but parts of one stupendous whole. – Pope

sublime adj. 1. Characterized by nobility; majestic. 2. a. Of high spiritual, moral, or intellectual worth. b. Not to be excelled; supreme. 3. Inspiring awe; impressive. 4. Obsolete. Of lofty appearance or bearing; haughty. 5. Archaic. Raised aloft; set high. -n. 1. Something that is sublime. 2. The ultimate example of something. -v.-limed -liming -limes -tr. 1. To render sublime. 2. Chemistry. To cause to sublimate. -intr. Chemistry. To sublimate. [Lat. sublimis, uplifted.] sublimely adv. sublimeness sublimity n.

submission n. 1. a. The act of submitting to the power of another. b. The state of having submitted. 2. The state of being submissive or compliant; meekness. 3. a. The act of submitting something for consideration. b. Something thus submitted. submissive adj. Disposed to submit; docile. submissively adv. submissiveness n. submit v. -mitted -mitting -mits -tr. 1. To yield or surrender (oneself) to the will or authority of another. 2. To subject to a condition or process. 3. To commit (something) to the consideration or judgment of another. 4. To offer as a proposition or contention: I submit that the terms are entirely unreasonable. -intr. 1. To yield to the opinion or authority of another; give in. 2. To allow oneself to be subjected; acquiesce. [ME submitten < Lat. submittere, to set under : sub-, under + mittere, to cause to go.] submittal n. submitter n.

subsequently adv. At a later time; afterwards. subsequent adj. Following in time or order; succeeding. Happening at a time subsequent to a reference time; “he apologized subsequently” [syn: later, afterwards, afterward, after, later on]

substantiate v. 1. To support with proof or evidence; verify: substantiate an accusation; confirm. To establish the existence or truth of by proof or competent evidence; to verify; as, to substantiate a charge or allegation; to substantiate a declaration. Observation is, in turn, wanted to direct and substantiate the course of experiment. – Coleridge. 2. To give material form to; embody; to make firm or solid. 3. To give substance to; make real or actual; to make to exist. (represent in bodily form; “He embodies all that is evil wrong with the system”; “The painting substantiates the feelings of the artist”) (make real or concrete; give reality or substance to; “our ideas must be substantiated into actions”) (solidify, firm, or strengthen; “The president's trip will substantiate good relations with the former enemy country”)

substantiation n. The act of substantiating or proving; evidence; proof. substantiate 1. To support with proof or evidence; verify: substantiate an accusation. confirm. 2. To give material form to; embody. To make firm or solid. 3. To give substance to; make real or actual. [New Latin substantiare, substantiat-, from Latin substantia, substance.

superadditive = super- pref. 1. Above; over; upon: superimpose. 2. Superior in size, quality, number, or degree: superfine. 3. Exceeding a norm: supersaturate. Excessive in degree or intensity: supersubtle. Containing a specified ingredient in an unusually high proportion: superphosphate. 4. More inclusive than a specified category: superorder. [Latin, from super, over, above]. + additive (adi-tiv) n. A substance added in small amounts to something else to improve, strengthen, or otherwise alter it.adj. 1. Marked by, produced by, or involving addition. 2. Color. Of or being any of certain primary colors of wavelengths that may be mixed with one another to produce other colors.

superb adj. 1. Of unusually high quality; excellent; grand; magnificent; august; stately; as, a superb edifice; a superb colonnade; a superb wine; superb skill. 2. Majestic; imposing: The cheetah is a superb animal. 3. Rich; luxurious.

superficially adv. superficial a. 1. Of or pertaining to the superficies, or surface; lying on the surface; shallow; not deep; as, a superficial color; a superficial covering; superficial measure or contents; superficial tillage. 2. Reaching or comprehending only what is obvious or apparent; not deep or profound; shallow; -- said especially in respect to study, learning, and the like; as, a superficial scholar; superficial knowledge. This superficial tale Is but a preface of her worthy praise. --Shak. He is a presumptuous and superficial writer. --Burke. That superficial judgment, which happens to be right without deserving to be so. --J. H. Newman. -- Superficialness, n. [L. superficialis: cf. F. superficiel.]

supernal adj. Celestial; heavenly; of, coming from, or being in the sky or high above. (being or coming from on high; “interpret the plague as a visitation from heaven, a supernal punishment for the sins of men”) Ethereal, of heaven or the spirit; (“the supernal happiness of a quiet death”) Relating or belonging to things above; celestial; heavenly; as, supernal grace, of heaven or the spirit; being in a higher place or region; locally higher; as, the supernal orbs; supernal regions. supernal (vs. infernal) – (being or coming from on high; "interpret the plague as a visitation from heaven, a supernal punishment for the sins of men") celestial, ethereal, supernal – (of heaven or the spirit; "celestial peace"; "ethereal melodies"; "the supernal happiness of a quiet death")  “That supernal judge.” – Shak. Not by the sufferance of supernal power. – Milton. [Middle English, from Old French, from Latin supernus < super, over.]

superpersonality super + personality n. 1. The quality or condition of being a person. 2. The totality of qualities and traits, as of character or behavior, that are peculiar to a specific person. 3. The pattern of collective character, behavioral, temperamental, emotional, and mental traits of a person: Though their personalities differed, they got along as friends. 4. Distinctive qualities of a person, especially those distinguishing personal characteristics that make one socially appealing: won the election more on personality than on capability. disposition. 5. A person as the embodiment of distinctive traits of mind and behavior. Usage Problem. A person of prominence or notoriety: television personalities. 6. personalities. An offensively personal remark: Let's not engage in personalities. 7. The distinctive characteristics of a place or situation: furnishings that give a room personality. n. attributive. Often used to modify another noun: personality disorders; a personality problem. [Middle English personalite, from Old French, from Late Latin personalitas, from Latin personalis, personal, from persona, person.] A person's emotional, intellectual, and moral qualities: personality, humor, cast, character, complexion, constitution, disposition, identity, makeup, nature, persona, spirit, temperament.

supervene v. 1. To come or occur as something extraneous, additional, or unexpected; follow. 2. To follow immediately after; ensue.[Latin supervenire : super-, super- + venire, to come.] (take place as an additional or unexpected development)

supplications n. Humble and earnest prayer, as in worship. A humble petition; an earnest request; an entreaty, a prayer asking God's help as part of a religious service. 2. Plea – a humble request for help from someone in authority, the act of communicating with a deity (especially as a petition or in adoration or contrition or thanksgiving. (Rom. Antiq.) A religious solemnity observed in consequence of some military success, and also, in times of distress and danger, to avert the anger of the gods. Syn: Entreaty; petition; solicitation; craving. 1. invocation, supplication – (a prayer asking God's help as part of a religious service) 2. supplication, plea – (a humble request for help from someone in authority) 3. prayer, supplication – (the act of communicating with a deity (especially as a petition or in adoration or contrition or thanksgiving); "the priest sank to his knees in prayer")

supremacy n. pl. -cies 1. The condition or quality of being supreme. 2. Supreme power or authority. supreme adj. 1. Greatest in power, authority, or rank; paramount; dominant. 2. Greatest in importance, degree, significance, character, or achievement. 3. Ultimate; final: the supreme sacrifice. [Lat. supremus, superl. of superus, upper < super, over.] supremely adv. supremeness n.

supreme adj. 1. Greatest in power, authority, or rank; paramount or dominant. 2. Greatest in importance, degree, significance, character, or achievement. 3. Ultimate; final: the supreme sacrifice. [Lat. supremus, superl. of superus, upper < super, over.] supremely adv. supremeness n.

surcharged v. 1. surcharge – (charge an extra fee, as for a special service) 2. overcharge, soak, surcharge, fleece, plume, pluck, rob, hook – (rip off; ask an unreasonable price) 3. surcharge – (fill to capacity with people; "The air raids had surcharged the emergency wards") 4. surcharge – (print a new denomination on a stamp or a banknote) 5. surcharge – (fill to an excessive degree; "The air was surcharged with tension") 6. overload, surcharge, overcharge – (place too much a load on; "don't overload the car") 7. surcharge – (show an omission in (an account) for which credit ought to have been given)

sweeping adj. 1. Having wide-ranging influence or effect: sweeping changes. 2. Moving in or as if in a wide curve: a sweeping gesture; a sweeping glance. 3. Indiscriminate; wholesale: sweeping generalizations. 4. Overwhelming; complete: a sweeping victory.

symbol n. 1. Something that represents something else by association, resemblance, or convention, esp. a material object used to represent something invisible. 2. A printed or written sign used to represent an operation, element, quantity, quality, or relation, as in mathematics or music. -tr.v.-boled -boling -bols To symbolize. [Lat. symbolum < Gk. sumbolon, token for identification (by comparison with a counterpart) < sumballein, to compare : sun-, together + ballein, to throw.] symbolic or symbolical adj. 1. Of, pertaining to, or expressed by means of a symbol or symbols. 2. Serving as a symbol. 3. Characterized by the use of symbolism, as a work of art. symbolically adv. symbolicalness n.

synchrony n. Simultaneous occurrence; synchronism. The concurrence of events in time. The relation that exists when things occur at the same time; “the drug produces an increased synchrony of the brain waves.” 1. Occurring or existing at the same time. Contemporary. 2. Moving or operating at the same rate. 3. Having identical periods. Having identical period and phase. [From Late Latin synchronus, from Greek sunkhronos : sun-, syn- + khronos, time.]

synthesis n. The combining of separate elements or substances to form a coherent whole. Composition, or the putting of two or more things together, as in compounding medicines. (Chemistry) Formation of a compound from simpler compounds or elements. (Philosophy) 1. Reasoning from the general to the particular; logical deduction. 2. The combination of thesis and antithesis in the Hegelian dialectical process whereby a new and higher level of truth is produced.

system n. 1. A group of interacting, interrelated, or interdependent elements forming a complex whole. 2. A functionally related group of elements, esp.: a. The human body regarded as a functional physiological unit. b. A group of physiologically complementary organs or parts: the nervous system. c. A group of interacting mechanical or electrical components. d. A network of structures and channels, as for communications, travel, or distribution. 3. A structurally or anatomically related group of elements or parts. 4. A set of interrelated ideas or principles. 5. A social, economic, or political organizational form. 6. A naturally occurring group of objects or phenomena: the solar system. 7. A set of objects or phenomena grouped together for classification or analysis. 8. The state or condition of harmonious, orderly interaction. 9. A method; procedure. 10. An organized society; establishment. [LLat. systema, systemat- < Gk. sustema < sunistanai, to combine : sun-, together + histanai, to make stand.]

systematic (sist-matik) also sys-tem-at-i-cal (-i-kl) adj. 1. Of, characterized by, based on, or constituting a system. 2. Carried on using step-by-step procedures. 3. Purposefully regular; methodical, orderly. 4. Of or relating to classification or taxonomy. -- systematically adv. Proceeding in or following a prescribed pattern or plan. adj. systematic, organized, deliberate, methodical, orderly, systematized, ordered. Antonyms: unsystematic, disorganized, disorderly, unordered.

testifies v. 1. To make a solemn declaration, verbal or written, to establish some fact; to give testimony for the purpose of communicating to others a knowledge of something not known to them. Jesus . . . needed not that any should testify of man, for he knew what was in man. – (John ii.25) 2. (Law) To make a solemn declaration under oath or affirmation, for the purpose of establishing, or making proof of, some fact to a court; to give testimony in a cause depending before a tribunal. One witness shall not testify against any person to cause him to die. – (Num. xxxv.30) 3. To declare a charge; to protest; to give information; to bear witness; – with against. O Israel, . . . I will testify against thee. – (Ps. l.7) I testified against them in the day wherein they sold victuals. – (Neh.xiii.15)

theory n. pl. -ries 1. a. Systematically organized knowledge applicable in a relatively wide variety of circumstances, esp. a system of assumptions, accepted principles, and rules of procedure devised to analyze, predict, or otherwise explain the nature or behavior of a specified set of phenomena. b. Such knowledge or such a system distinguished from experiment or practice. 2. Abstract reasoning; speculation. 3. An assumption or guess based on limited information or knowledge. [LLat. theoria < Gk. theoria < theoros, spectator < theasthai, to observe.]

toil intr.v. toiled, toiling, toils To labor continuously; work strenuously. To proceed with difficulty: toiling over the mountains. n. Something that binds, snares, or entangles one; an entrapment. Often used in the plural: caught in the toils of despair. Exhausting labor or effort: “A bit of the blackest and coarsest bread is... the sole recompense and the sole profit attaching to so arduous a toil” (George Sand). [Middle English toilen, from Anglo-Norman toiler, to stir about, from Latin tudiculre, from tudicula, a machine for bruising olives, diminutive of tudes, hammer.]

traditional adj. Of, pertaining to, or in accord with tradition. traditionally adv. tradition n. 1. The passing down of elements of a culture from generation to generation, esp. by oral communication. 2. a. A mode of thought or behavior followed by a people continuously from generation to generation; custom or usage. b. A set of such customs and usages viewed as a coherent body of precedents influencing the present. 3. A body of unwritten religious precepts. 4. A time-honored practice or a set of such practices. 5. Law. The transfer of property to another. [ME tradicion < OFr. < Lat. traditio < tradere, to hand down : trans, over + dare, to give.]

transaction n. 1 : something transacted; especially : an exchange or transfer of goods, services, or funds 2 a : an act, process, or instance of transacting b : an action or activity involving two parties or things that reciprocally affect or influence each other. 1. The doing or performing of any business; management of any affair; performance. 2. That which is done; an affair; as, the transactions on the exchange.

transcendence n. a state of being or existence above and beyond the limits of material experience [syn: transcendency] 2: the state of excelling or surpassing or going beyond usual limits [syn: transcendency, superiority] transcendent adj. 1. Surpassing others; preeminent or supreme. 2. Lying beyond the ordinary range of perception. 3. Philosophy. 1. Transcending the Aristotelian categories. 2. In Kant's theory of knowledge, being beyond the limits of experience and hence unknowable. 4. Religion. Being above and independent of the material universe. Used of the Deity. Surpassing others; preeminent or supreme.

transcendent adj. 1. Surpassing others; preeminent or supreme. 2. Lying beyond the ordinary range of perception: “fails to achieve a transcendent significance in suffering and squalor” (National Review). 3. Philosophy. a. Transcending the Aristotelian categories. b. In Kant's theory of knowledge, being beyond the limits of experience and hence unknowable. 4. Being above and independent of the material universe. Used of the Deity. 1. Very excellent; superior or supreme in excellence; surpassing others; as, transcendent worth; transcendent valor. Clothed with transcendent brightness. – Milton. 2. (Kantian Philos.) Transcending, or reaching beyond, the limits of human knowledge; – applied to affirmations and speculations concerning what lies beyond the reach of the human intellect. adj 1: beyond and outside the ordinary range of human experience or understanding; “philosophers...often explicitly reject the notion of any transcendent reality beyond thought...and claim to be concerned only with thought itself...” “the unknowable mysteries of life” [syn: unknowable] 2: exceeding or surpassing usual limits especially in excellence [syn: surpassing] Unknowable – (beyond and outside the ordinary range of human experience or understanding; "philosophers...often explicitly reject the notion of any transcendent reality beyond thought...and claim to be concerned only with thought itself..."- W.P.Alston; "the unknowable mysteries of lifer") surpassing – (exceeding or surpassing usual limits especially in excellence) transcendence transcendency n. transcendently adv. [syn: surpassing]

transcendental adj. 1. Surpassing all others; superior. 2. Beyond common thought or experience; mystical or supernatural. (Philosophy) Concerned with the a priori or intuitive basis of knowledge as independent of experience; asserting a fundamental irrationality or supernatural element in experience; existing outside of or not in accordance with nature; “find transcendental motives for sublunary action” – Aldous Huxley [syn: nonnatural, otherworldly, preternatural] (Philosophy) Concerned with the a priori or intuitive basis of knowledge as independent of experience; asserting a fundamental irrationality or supernatural element in experience; of or characteristic of a system of philosophy emphasizing the intuitive and spiritual about the empirical and material. (a). Concerned with the a priori or intuitive basis of knowledge as independent of experience. (b). Asserting a fundamental irrationality or supernatural element in experience.

transcendently adv. transcendent adj. 1. Surpassing others; preeminent or supreme. 2. Lying beyond the ordinary range of perception: “fails to achieve a transcendent significance in suffering and squalor” (National Review). 3. Philosophy. a. Transcending the Aristotelian categories. b. In Kant's theory of knowledge, being beyond the limits of experience and hence unknowable. 4. Being above and independent of the material universe. Used of the Deity. transcendence or transcendency n.

transcends v. transcended, transcending, transcends v.tr. 1. To pass beyond the limits of: emotions that transcend understanding. 2. To be greater than, as in intensity or power; surpass: love that transcends infatuation. 3. To exist above and independent of (material experience or the universe): “One never can see the thing in itself, because the mind does not transcend phenomena” (Hilaire Belloc). v.intr. To be transcendent; excel. [Middle English transcenden, from Old French transcendre, from Latin trnscendere : trns-, trans- + scandere, to climb]

transfer (trans-fur, transfr) v. trans-ferred, trans-fer-ring, trans-fers.v. tr. 1. To convey or cause to pass from one place, person, or thing to another. 2. Law. To make over the possession or legal title of; convey. 3. To convey (a design, for example) from one surface to another, as by impression.v. intr. 1. To move oneself from one location or job to another. 2. To withdraw from one educational institution or course of study and enroll in another. 3. To change from one public conveyance to another: transferred to another bus.n. (transfr). trans-fer-al (trans-furl). The conveyance or removal of something from one place, person, or thing to another. 2. One who transfers or is transferred, as to a new school. 3. A design conveyed by contact from one surface to another. 4. A ticket entitling a passenger to change from one public conveyance to another as part of one trip. A place where such a change is made. 5. Also transferal. Law. A conveyance of title or property from one person to another. [Middle English transferren, from Old French transferer, from Latin transferre : trans-, trans- + ferre, to carry.] --trans-fer'a-bil'i-ty n. -- transferable or trans-fer'ra-ble adj. --trans-fer'rer n.The movement of something from one place to another : transfer, move, shift, relocation, relocating, transferal, transferring, transference, conveyance, conveying, shipment, transmittal, transport, transmission, transportation, shifting, repositioning, displacement, translation, migration. The act of transferring property to another : delivery, conveyance, consignment, shipping, transmittal, transferral, transmission, handing over, giving over, transfer. To serve as a conduit for. v. channel, siphon, carry, conduct, convey, pipe, supply, transfer, transmit. To move from one place to another. v. relocate, decamp, emigrate, evacuate, ferry, ship, shift, dislocate, disturb, transfer, remove, transplant, withdraw, maneuver. To change or cause to change from one place to another. v. move, remove, shift, relocate, disturb, ship, transfer. To turn over the ownership of (property) to another. v. transfer, make over, sign over. To give up a possession to a new owner. v. relinquish, hand over, surrender, transfer, turn over, deliver up, sign away.

transformation n. The act of transforming, or the state of being transformed; change of form or condition. transformations n.pl. The act of transforming, or the state of being transformed; change of form or condition. Specifically: (a) (Biol.) Any change in an organism which alters its general character and mode of life, as in the development of the germ into the embryo, the egg into the animal, the larva into the insect (metamorphosis), etc.; also, the change which the histological units of a tissue are prone to undergo. Metamorphosis. [L. transformatio: cf. transformation.]

transformations n.pl. transformation n. The act of transforming, or the state of being transformed; change of form or condition. Specifically: (a) (Biol.) Any change in an organism which alters its general character and mode of life, as in the development of the germ into the embryo, the egg into the animal, the larva into the insect (metamorphosis), etc.; also, the change which the histological units of a tissue are prone to undergo. Metamorphosis. [L. transformatio: cf. transformation.]

transit n. The act of passing; passage through or over. In France you are now . . . in the transit from one form of government to another. – Burke. 2. The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the transit of goods through a country. 3. A line or route of passage or conveyance. 4. A surveying instrument similar to a theodolite that measures horizontal and vertical angles. (Astronomy) 1. The passage of a celestial body across the observer's meridian. 2. The passage of a smaller celestial body or its shadow across the disk of a larger celestial body.

transition n. Passage from one place or state to another; from one form, state, style, or place to another, as, the transition of the weather from hot to cold. There is no death, what seems so is transition. – Longfellow.

transmissible adj. Capable of being transmitted from one to another; capable of being passed through any body or substance.

transmission n. The act of transmitting, or the state of being transmitted; as, the transmission of letters, writings, papers, news, and the like, from one country to another; the transmission of rights, titles, or privileges, from father to son, or from one generation to another.

transmit v. tr. 1. To send from one person, thing, or place to another; convey. 2. To cause to spread; pass on: transmit an infection. 3. To impart or convey to others by heredity or inheritance; hand down. 4. To pass along (news or information); communicate. 5. a. Electronics. To send (a signal), as by wire or radio. b. Physics. To cause (a disturbance) to propagate through a medium. 6. To convey (force or energy) from one part of a mechanism to another.

transmittal n : the act of sending a message; causing (a message) to be transmitted. The act or process of transmitting; a transmission.

transmutation n. 1. The act of transmuting. 2. The state of being transmuted. 3. In alchemy, the alleged conversion of base metals into gold or silver. 4. Physics. The transformation of one element into another by one or a series of nuclear reactions. transmutational transmutative adj. transmute tr.v. -muted -muting -mutes To change from one form, nature, substance, or state into another; transform. [ME transmuten < Lat. transmutare : trans, across + mutare, to change.] transmutability transmutableness n. transmutable adj. transmutably adv. transmuter n.

transpire v.intr. 1. To become known; come to light. 2. To come about; to happen or come to pass; to occur. To give off (vapor containing waste products) through the pores of the skin or the stomata of plant tissue. 1. To become known; come to light. 2. Usage Problem. To come about; happen or occur. 3. To give off vapor containing waste products, as through animal or plant pores. [French transpirer, from Medieval Latin transpirare : Latin trans-, trans- + Latin spirare, to breathe.]

traverse traversed v. To travel or pass across, over, or through. To move to and fro over; cross and recross. To go up, down, or across (a slope) diagonally, as in skiing. To cause to move laterally on a pivot; swivel: traverse an artillery piece. To extend across; cross: a bridge that traverses a river. To move to the side or back and forth. To turn laterally; swivel. To go up, down, or across a slope diagonally or in a zigzag manner, as in skiing. 2. To slide one's blade with pressure toward the hilt of the opponent's foil in fencing. Lying across; being in a direction across something else; as, paths cut with traverse trenches. Oak . . . being strong in all positions, may be better trusted in cross and traverse work. – Sir H. Wotton.

travesty n. (a debased or grotesque likeness: a travesty of justice) (a burlesque translation or imitation of a work) farce, farce comedy – (a comedy characterized by broad satire and improbable situations) 2. parody, lampoon, spoof, sendup, mockery, takeoff, burlesque, charade, pasquinade, put-on – (a composition that imitates somebody's style in a humorous way) (disguised by dress so as to be ridiculous; travestied) [F. travesti, p. p. of travestir to disguise, to travesty, It. travestire, fr. L. trans across, over + vestire to dress, clothe.]

tribunals n.pl. tribunal n. 1 : the seat of a judge or one acting as a judge 2 : a court or forum of justice : a person or body of persons having to hear and decide disputes so as to bind the parties. 1. Law. 1. A seat or court of justice. 2. The bench on which a judge or other presiding officer sits in court. 2. A committee or board appointed to adjudicate in a particular matter. 3. Something that has the power to determine or judge: the tribunal of public opinion. [Etymology: Latin, platform for magistrates, from tribunus tribune, from tribus tribe.]

trillions n. The cardinal number equal to 10 to the 12th (or) a very large indefinite number (usually hyperbole) [millions, billions, zillions, jillions].

trinitarian (trini-tare-n) adj. 1. Of or relating to the Christian Trinity. Believing or professing belief in the Christian Trinity or the doctrine of the Trinity. 2. trinitarian. Having three members, parts, or facets. n. 1. One who believes in the Christian doctrine of the Trinity. 2. A member of a Roman Catholic religious congregation founded in 1198 and now devoted to teaching, nursing, and pastoral work.

triune (triyoon) adj.
(30:1.2) "Beings created by all three Paradise Deities, either as such or as the Trinity, together with the Trinitized Corps, which designation refers to all groups of trinitized beings, revealed and unrevealed." Being three in one. Used especially of the Christian Trinity. n. A trinity. [TRI- + Latin unus, one.] A group of three: trio, threesome, triad, trine, trinity, triple, triplet, triumvirate, triune, troika.

trustee n. An appointed person or institution that manages assets for the benefit of someone else. One to whom something is entrusted: one trusted to keep or administer something: as a member of a board entrusted with administering the funds and directing the policy of an institution or organization A natural or legal person to whom property is committed to be administered for the benefit of a beneficiary (as a person or charitable organization): the holder of legal title to property placed in a trust.

ultimacy n : the state or degree of being ultimate; the final or most extreme in degree or size or time or distance, "the ultimacy of these social values" [syn: ultimateness]

ultimate adj. Farthest; most remote in space or time; extreme; last; final. My harbor, and my ultimate repose. – Milton. Many actions apt to procure fame are not conductive to this our ultimate happiness. – Addison. 2. Last in a train of progression or consequences; tended toward by all that precedes; arrived at, as the last result; final. Those ultimate truths and those universal laws of thought which we can not rationally contradict. – Coleridge. 3. Incapable of further analysis; incapable of further division or separation; constituent; elemental; as, an ultimate constituent of matter. (Logic) The tracing of things to their source, and the resolving of knowledge into its original principles.

unavailing adj. Useless; unsuccessful; futile; producing no result or effect; “a futile effort”; “the therapy was ineffectual”; “an otiose undertaking”; “an unavailing attempt” [syn: futile, ineffectual, otiose] unavailingly adv. unavailingness n.

undiminished adj : not lessened or diminished [syn: unrelieved]

unfettered adj : not bound by shackles and chains [syn: unchained, unshackled, untied]

unique adj. 1. alone, unique, unequaled, unequalled, unparalleled – (radically distinctive and without equal; "he is alone in the field of microbiology"; "this theory is altogether alone in its penetration of the problem"; "Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint"; "craftsmen whose skill is unequaled"; "unparalleled athletic ability"; "a breakdown of law unparalleled in our history") 2. unique (predicate) – (followed by `to') applying exclusively to a given category or condition or locality; "a species unique to Australia") 3. singular, unique – (the single one of its kind; "a singular example"; "the unique existing example of Donne's handwriting"; "a unique copy of an ancient manuscript"; "certain types of problems have unique solutions") 4. unique – (highly unusual or rare but not the single instance; "spoke with a unique accent"; "had unique ability in raising funds"; "a frankness unique in literature"; "a unique dining experience")

unity (yooni-te) n.pl. u-ni-ties. 1. The state or quality of being one; singleness. 2. The state or quality of being in accord; harmony. 3. The combination or arrangement of parts into a whole; unification. A combination or union thus formed. 4. Singleness or constancy of purpose or action; continuity: "In an army you need unity of purpose" (Emmeline Pankhurst). 5. An ordering of all elements in a work of art or literature so that each contributes to a unified aesthetic effect. The effect thus produced. 6. One of the three principles of dramatic structure derived by French neoclassicists from Aristotle's Poetics, stating that a drama should have but one plot, which should take place in a single day and be confined to a single locale. 7. Mathematics. The number 1. [Middle English unite, from Old French, from Latin unitas, from unus, one. See oi-no-.] SYNONYM: unity, union, solidarity These nouns denote the condition of accord resulting from an identity or coincidence of interests, purposes, or sympathies among the members of a group. Unity implies agreement and collaboration among interdependent, usually varied components: "Religion ... calls for the integration of lands and peoples in harmonious unity" (Vine Deloria, Jr). Union connotes harmony, cohesiveness, and often unanimity among individuals united in a whole: "All your strength is in your union./All your danger is in discord" (Henry Wadsworth Longfellow). Solidarity refers to the community of objectives and responsibilities that enables a group of people to think and act as one: "A downtrodden class ... will never be able to make an effective protest until it achieves solidarity" (H.G. Wells) The quality or condition of being in agreement : concurrence, accord, concert, assent, concord, consensus, harmony, like-mindedness, oneness, solidarity, unanimity, unity. Antonyms: discord, disagreement, disharmony, divergence. The condition of being one : singleness, singularity, oneness, individuality, unity.

universal adj. 1. Of, pertaining to, extending to, or affecting the entire world or all within the world; worldwide. 2. Including, pertaining to, or affecting all members of the class or group under consideration: the universal skepticism of philosophers. 3. Applicable or common to all purposes, conditions, or situations. 4. Of or pertaining to the universe or cosmos; cosmic. 5. Comprising all or many subjects; comprehensively broad. 6. Adapted or adjustable to many sizes or mechanical uses. 7. Logic. Predicable of all the members of a class or genus denoted by the subject. Used of a proposition. -n. 1. Logic. a. A universal proposition. b. A general or abstract concept or term considered absolute or axiomatic. 2. A general or widely held principle, concept, or notion. 3. A trait or pattern of behavior characteristic of all the members of a particular culture or of all human beings. universally adv. universalness n.

universality n. pl. -ties 1. The quality, fact, or condition of being universal. 2. Great or unbounded versatility of the mind.

universe n. 1. All existing things, including the earth, the heavens, the galaxies, and all therein, regarded as a whole. 2. a. The earth together with all its inhabitants and created things. b. All mankind. 3. The sphere or realm in which something exists or takes place. 4. Logic. The universe of discourse. [ME < OFr. univers < Lat. Universum, neuter of universus, whole : unus, one + versus, p.part. of vertere, to turn.]

unmitigated adj. 1. Not diminished or moderated in intensity or severity; unrelieved: unmitigated suffering. 2. Without qualification or exception; absolute: an unmitigated lie. Not diminished or moderated in intensity or severity; sometimes used as an intensifier;"unmitigated suffering;" "an unmitigated horror;" "an unmitigated lie" [ant: mitigated]

unqualified adj. Not modified by conditions or reservations; absolute. Not limited or restricted. 1. unqualified (vs. qualified) – (not limited or restricted; “an unqualified denial”) 2. unqualified (vs. qualified) – (not meeting the proper standards and requirements and training) 3. unentitled, unqualified – (having no right or entitlement; “a distinction to which he was unentitled”) 4. unqualified – (lacking specific legal qualifications; “a wife is usually considered unqualified to testify against her husband”) 5. incapable, unqualified – (lacking the necessary skill or knowledge etc.; “an incapable helper”)

unsearchable adj. Beyond search or investigation; inscrutable. Not searchable; inscrutable; hidden; mysterious. The counsels of God are to us unsearchable.

unstinted adj. Lavish, munificent, overgenerous, prodigal, too-generous, unsparing, unstinted, unstinting very generous; “distributed gifts with a lavish hand”; “the critics were lavish in their praise”; “a munificent gift”; “his father gave him a half-dollar and his mother a quarter and he thought them munificent”; “prodigal praise”; “unsparing generosity”; “his unstinted devotion”; “called for unstinting aid to Britain” [syn: lavish, munificent, overgenerous, prodigal, too-generous, unsparing, unstinting]

untold adj. 1. Not told or revealed: untold secrets. 2. Beyond description or enumeration; of an incalculable amount: untold suffering. Not numbered or counted.

unvarying adj 1: persistent in occurrence and unvarying in nature; “maintained a constant temperature”; “a constant beat”; “principles of unvarying validity”; “a steady breeze” [syn: changeless, constant, invariant, steady] 2: lacking variety [syn: unvaried] [ant: varied] 3: always the same; showing a single form or character in all occurrences; “a street of uniform tall white buildings” [syn: uniform] [ant: multiform]

upholder n. uphold tr.v. -held -holding -holds 1. To hold aloft; raise. 2. To prevent from falling or sinking; support. 3. To maintain or affirm in the face of a challenge: The Declaration of Right upheld the principle of hereditary monarchy (Edmund Burke). [ME upholden: up, up + holden, to hold.]

urge v. 1. To force or drive forward or onward; impel. 2. To entreat earnestly and often repeatedly; exhort. 3. To advocate earnestly the doing, consideration, or approval of; press for: urge passage of the bill; a speech urging moderation. 4. To stimulate; excite: "It urged him to an intensity like madness" (D.H. Lawrence). 5. To move or impel to action, effort, or speed; spur.v. intr. 1. To exert an impelling force; push vigorously. 2. To present a forceful argument, claim, or case.n. 1. The act of urging. 2. An impulse that prompts action or effort: suppressed an urge to laugh. An involuntary tendency to perform a given activity; an instinct: "There is a human urge to clarify, rationalize, justify" (Leonard Bernstein).[Latin urgere.]

validate v. -dated -dating -dates 1. To declare or make legally valid. 2. To mark with an indication of official sanction. 3. To establish the soundness of; corroborate; to substantiate; verify, confirm: Experiments validated his theory.

variegated v. (change the appearance of, especially by marking with different colors) 2. vary, variegate, motley – (make something more diverse and varied; "Vary the menu")

variously adv : in diverse ways; “the alternatives that are variously represented by the participants”; “the speakers treated the subject most diversely” [syn: diversely, multifariously] various Of diverse kinds: for various reasons. Unlike; different. Being more than one; several. Many-sided; versatile: a person of various skills. Having a variegated nature or appearance. Being an individual or separate member of a class or group: The various reports all agreed. Archaic. Changeable; variable.

vast (vast) adj. vast-er, vast-est. 1. Very great in size, number, amount, or quantity. 2. Very great in area or extent; immense. 3. Very great in degree or intensity. Enormous. n. Archaic. An immense space. [Latin vastus.] --vast'ly adv. --vast'ness n. Broad in scope or extent. adj. extensive, catholic, comprehensive, expansive, far-reaching, general, pandemic, wide, widespread, vast. Antonyms: narrow.

vaults n. 1. An arched structure, usually of masonry or concrete, serving to cover a space. 2. An arched overhead covering, such as the sky, that resembles the architectural structure in form. 3. A room or space, such as a cellar or storeroom, with arched walls and ceiling, especially when underground. 4. A room or compartment, often built of steel, for the safekeeping of valuables: a bank vault.

veneration adj. reverence, awe, devotion, profound respect – (the highest degree of respect and reverence; respect mingled with awe; a feeling or sentimental excited by the dignity, wisdom, or superiority of a person, by sacredness of character, by consecration to sacred services, or by hallowed associations) (a profound emotion inspired by a deity; “the veneration of God”) (religious zeal; willingness to serve God)

verities 1. The quality or condition of being true, factual, or real. 2. Something, such as a statement, principle, or belief, that is true, especially an enduring truth; the quality or state of being true, or real; consonance of a statement, proposition, or other thing, with fact; truth; reality. “The verity of certain words.” – Shak. It is a proposition of eternal verity, that none can govern while he is despised. – South. 2. That which is true; a true assertion or tenet; a truth; a reality. Mark what I say, which you shall find By every syllable a faithful verity. – Shak.

versatile (vurs-tl, -til) adj. 1. Capable of doing many things competently. 2. Having varied uses or serving many functions: "The most versatile of vegetables is the tomato" (Craig Claiborne). 3. Variable or inconstant; changeable: a versatile temperament. 4. Biology. Capable of moving freely in all directions, as the antenna of an insect, the toe of an owl, or the loosely attached anther of a flower. [Latin versatilis, from versatus, past participle of versare, to turn.] --ver'sa-tile-ly adv. --ver'sa-til'i-ty (-tili-te). or ver'sa-tile-ness (-tl-nis, -til-). n. SYNONYM: versatile, all-around, many-sided, multifaceted, multifarious The central meaning shared by these adjectives is "having many aspects, uses, or abilities": a versatile writer; an all-around athlete; a many-sided subject; a multifaceted undertaking; multifarious interests. Having many aspects, uses, or abilities. adj. versatile, all-purpose, all-around, all-round, flexible, many-sided, multifaceted, multipurpose, protean. Antonyms: one-sided.

veto adj. veto n. 1. (a vote that blocks a decision) 2. (the power or right to prohibit or reject a proposed or intended act (especially the power of a chief executive to reject a bill passed by the legislature)

vicegerent adj. Having or exercising delegated power; acting by substitution, or in the place of another. n. A person appointed by a ruler or head of state to act as an administrative deputy; someone appointed by a ruler as an administrative deputy. An officer who is deputed by a superior, or by proper authority, to exercise the powers of another; a lieutenant; a vicar. “The symbol and vicegerent of the Deity.” – C. A. Young.

vicissitudes n. 1. vicissitude – (a variation in circumstances or fortune at different times in your life or in the development of something; "the project was subject to the usual vicissitudes of exploratory research") 2. vicissitude – (mutability in life or nature (especially successive alternation from one condition to another)

virtually adv. In a virtual manner; in efficacy or effect only, and not actually; to all intents and purposes; practically. In fact or to all purposes; practically: The city was virtually paralyzed by the transit strike. 2. Almost but not quite; nearly: “Virtually everyone gets a headache now and then” 1. literally, virtually – (intensifier before a figurative expression) without exaggeration; "our eyes were literally pinned to TV during the Gulf war") 2. virtually – (in essence or effect but not in fact; "the strike virtually paralyzed the city"; "I'm virtually broke") 3. about, just about, almost, most, all but, nearly, near, nigh, virtually, well-nigh – (of actions or states) slightly short of or not quite accomplished; `near' is sometimes used informally for `nearly' and `most' is sometimes used informally for `almost'; "the job is (just) about done"; "the baby was almost asleep when the alarm sounded"; "we're almost finished"; "the car all but ran her down"; "he nearly fainted"; "talked for nigh onto 2 hours"; "the recording is well-nigh perfect"; "virtually all the parties signed the contract"; "I was near exhausted by the run"; "most everyone agrees."

vital adj. 1: urgently needed; absolutely necessary; “a critical element of the plan”; “critical medical supplies”; “vital for a healthy society”; “of vital interest” [syn: critical] 2: performing an essential function in the living body; “vital organs”; “blood and other vital fluids”; “the loss of vital heat in shock”; “a vital spot”; “life-giving love and praise” [syn: life-sustaining] 3: full of spirit; “a dynamic full of life woman”; “a vital and charismatic leader”; “this whole lively world” [syn: full of life, lively] 4: manifesting or characteristic of life; “a vital, living organism”; “vital signs” 1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of life. 2. Necessary to the continuation of life. 3. Used or done on a living cell or tissue, as in staining. 4. Destructive to life; fatal, as of an injury.

volition n. 1. The act or an instance of making a conscious choice or decision. 2. A conscious choice or decision. 3. The power or faculty of choosing; the will. [French, from Medieval Latin voliti, volitin-, from Latin velle, vol-, to wish.]

volitional adj. With deliberate intention; "a volitional act" volition n. 1. The act or an instance of making a conscious choice or decision. 2. A conscious choice or decision. 3. The power or faculty of choosing; the will. [French, from Medieval Latin voliti, volitin-, from Latin velle, vol-, to wish.]

voluntarily adv. voluntariness n. Synonyms: voluntary intentional deliberate willful willing spontaneous These adjectives mean unforced. Voluntary is applied in several related senses to what is done by choice, to physical movement subject to regulation by the will, and less often to action that is not only of one's choice but premeditated. The last-named sense is more basic to intentional and deliberate; in addition, deliberate stresses the idea of action taken with full awareness of the consequences. Willful can mean merely in accordance with one's will but often implies headstrong persistence in a self-determined course of action. Willing suggests acceding to a course proposed by another, without reluctance or even eagerly. Spontaneous refers to behavior that seems wholly unpremeditated, a natural response and a true reflection of one's feelings. cf.

voluntary adj. 1. a. Arising from one's own free will. b. Acting on one's own initiative. 2. Acting or serving in a specified capacity willingly and without constraint or guarantee of reward. 3. Normally controlled by or subject to individual volition. 4. Capable of exercising will; volitional. 5. Proceeding from impulse; spontaneous. 6. Law. a. Acting or performed without external persuasion or compulsion. b. Without legal obligation, payment, or valuable consideration: a voluntary conveyance. c. Not accidental; intentional: voluntary manslaughter. -n.pl. -ies 1. Music. Solo organ music, occasionally improvised, that is played usually before and sometimes during or after a church service. 2. A volunteer. [ME < Lat. voluntarius < voluntas, choice < velle, to wish.]

watchword n. 1. war cry, rallying cry, battle cry, cry – (a slogan used to rally support for a cause; “a cry to arms”; “our watchword will be `democracy'”) 2. password, word, parole, countersign – (a secret word or phrase known only to a restricted group; “he forgot the password”)

whimsical adj. capricious, impulsive – (determined by chance or impulse or whim rather than by necessity or reason; “a capricious refusal”; “authoritarian rulers are frequently capricious”; “the victim of whimsical persecutions”)

withal adv. withal – (together with this) – however, nevertheless, still, yet, all the same, even so, nonetheless, notwithstanding – (despite anything to the contrary (usually following a concession); “although I'm a little afraid, however I'd like to try it”; “while we disliked each other, nevertheless we agreed”; “he was a stern yet fair master”; “granted that it is dangerous, all the same I still want to go”)

worship n. 1. a. The reverent love and allegiance accorded a deity, idol, or sacred object. b. A set of ceremonies, prayers, or other religious forms by which this love is expressed. 2. a. Ardent, humble devotion. b. The object of such devotion. 3. Worship Chiefly British. A title of honor used in addressing magistrates, mayors, and certain other dignitaries: Your Worship. -v.-shiped -shiping -ships or -shipped, -shipping, -ships. -tr. 1. To honor and love as a deity; venerate. 2. To love or pursue devotedly. -intr. 1. To participate in religious rites of worship. 2. To perform an act of worship. [ME < OE weoroscipe, honor : weoro, worth + -scipe, -ship.] worshiper n.